Visions of the Retrofuture

We affirm that the world’s magnificence has been
enriched by a new beauty: the beauty of speed.
A racing car whose hood is adorned with great pipes,
like serpents of explosive breath—a roaring car
that seems to ride on grapeshot is more beautiful
than the Victory of Samothrace.
(Filippo Tommaso Marinetti, The Futurist Manifesto, 1909)

At the beginning of the 20th century, the world was rapidly changing.
In the cities, people began to go out at night thanks to the electricity that had started to illuminate the streets; film cameras had been recently invented; in 1901 thanks to his wireless telegraph Guglielmo Marconi launched the first transoceanic radio signal.

Above all, the transport sector was making great strides.
The number of cars increased every day, assembly lines speeded up production times more and more; Paris and Berlin were building underground metropolitan transportation systems, just like the one in London.
Not only that, railways began to be built, that were even suspended above the houses: in 1901, the Wuppertailer Schewebebahn was built in the German town of Wuppertal, a 13.3km-long double-track railway with 23 stops, still in operation today. A bold and innovative work, which as we will see had an immediate impact on the collective imagination.

Even the sky no longer seemed so impossible to conquer.
In 1900 Ferdinand Von Zeppelin had flown over Lake Constance with its new rigid airship which, unlike the hot air balloons, could be controlled and guided.
From overseas news were coming of some reckless engineers who were trying to launch themselves into the air on new types of aircraft equipped with wings and rudders.

All these innovations contributed to fueling utopian fantasies of a radiant and hyper-technological future that awaited humanity. What would the cities of tomorrow look like?

We can take a peek at this possible future, this dreamed future, thanks to the postcards that circulated at the beginning of the century. Stefano Emilio, reader of Bizzarro Bazar, has collected several examples: these are real photographs of various cities — from Genoa to San Francisco — reinvented in a futuristic key, with added balloons, airplanes, flying ships. As you can see, the railway suspended in the style of that of Wuppertal is a constant presence, since it evidently had left its mark on popular imagination as an emblem of urban transformation.

Szombathely

Miskolcz

Atlantic City

Boston

Genova

Leominster

Boston

Revere Beach

But were these visions really so naive and utopian? In reality, upon closer examination, many images also included several kinds of accidents: pedestrians getting run over, cars colliding.

These postcards therefore had a double purpose: on one hand they proposed the unprecedented awe of seeing a city crowded with sci-fi vehicles, on the other they had a satirical intent (note the ship below, which is covering a route from Genoa to Mars!). In short, most of these images seem to ask, ironically, “where will we end up with all these devilries?”

La linea Marte-Genova

A final curiosity concerns a real accident, which happened on the suspended Wuppertal railway.
On 21 July 1950, the director of the Circus Althoff had a 4-year-old female elephant travel on the Wuppertailer Schewebebahn as a publicity stunt. While the suspended train was passing over the river, the animal began to trumpet and run inside the wagon, causing panic among the passengers. Terrified, she broke through a window and fell into the waters of the Wupper River, after falling for some 12 meters. Fortunately the baby elephant was saved, and after the accident she was named Tuffi (from the Italian word for “diving”). The circus director and the officer who had allowed the ride were fined, but on the other hand Tuffi became a small celebrity: the facade of a house near the railway still features a painting of the elephant, and the tourist office sells an assortment of Tuffi-related souvenirs.
The inevitable postcard was produced, with a photomontage that reconstructed the accident.

The future illustrated by early-20th century postcards may make us smile today, but it remains a fundamental element of the sci-fi imagery which then permeated the rest of the century, from Metropolis (1927) to steampunk subculture and to retrofuturism.

Blimps still float in the skies in Blade Runner (1982).

(Thanks, Stefano Emilio!)

7 comments to Visions of the Retrofuture

  1. Fritz Conti says:

    Fantastico! Ma esiste un volume che raccoglie queste Cartoline?

    • bizzarrobazar says:

      Non lo so, ho visto molti libri contemporanei ispirati a queste illustrazioni, ma immagino esista anche qualche edizione che raccoglie le cartoline originali.

  2. Come sempre un bellissimo testo. Ho raccolto molte cartoline, purtroppo non in originale, ma riproduzioni. Su ebay gli originali hanno quotazioni altissime, oltre i 50 euro… E’ interessante notare come gli editori si “rubassero” l’un l’altro le immagini della ferrovia o dei dirigibili, da inserire nei cieli della propria città. La stessa cosa è accaduta per una serie degli stessi anni, un omino con ombrello, tipo Mary Poppins che vola sulla città. L’omino è sempre lo stesso, cambia la città…

  3. Album says:

    E Salgari scriveva “Le meraviglie del Duemila”… uno dei pochi libri suoi che finisce malissimo, per quel che ne so 🤔
    Comunque bell’articolo, e blog davvero interessante! Capitato qui per caso anni fa, solo da un paio di articoli ho trovato il modo di seguire costantemente 😉

  4. Album says:

    Eheh, probabilmente non l’avevo notata, ma l’approccio RSS è comunque più generale! 🙂

  5. Gery says:

    Bellissime queste cartoline! Anche nel film d’animazione “Il castello errante di Howl “, ci sono alcune sequenze in cui nella capitale (ispirata a Vienna credo), sono presenti macchine volanti e aggeggi retro-futuristici molto simili a questi. Alcuni sembrano proprio gli stessi.

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