Links, Curiosities & Mixed Wonders – 28

Here is a new collection of trivia and oddities to start the year off right; enjoy!

  • Let’s begin with an extraordinary case reported in September 1988 in the British Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology:

The patient was a 15-year-old girl employed in a local bar. She was admitted to hospital after a knife fight involving her, a former lover and a new boyfriend. Who exactly stabbed whom was not quite clear but all three participants in the small war were admitted with knife injuries. The girl had some minor lacerations of the left hand and a single stab-wound in the upper abdomen.

The laparotomy revealed two holes in her stomach, resulting from a single stab wound; the stomach was empty and no gastric fluid spillage was noted in the abdomen, so the doctors sutured the wound and the young patient fully recovered within 10 days.
The bad story seemed to be resolved when, precisely 278 days later, the girl came back to the hospital with sharp pains in her abdomen, and as soon as they saw her the doctors immediately understood that the young woman was pregnant and about to give birth. On closer examination, however, there came a surprise: although the uterus was contracting normally and the cervix was almost fully dilated, the patient had no vagina. Between the labia minora, below the urethral meatus, there was only a shallow skin dimple. The baby, a perfectly healthy male, was delivered by cesarean section, but at that point

curiosity could not be contained any longer and the patient was interviewd with the help of a sympathetic nursing sister. The whole story did not become completely clear during that day but, with some subsequent inquiries, the whole saga emerged.
The patient was well aware of the fact that she had no vagina and she had started oral experiments after disappointing attempts at conventional intercourse. Just before she was stabbed in the abdomen she had practised fellatio with her new boyfriend and was caught in the act by her former lover. The fight with knives ensued. [Subsequently] she had been worried about the increase in her abdominal size but could not believe she was pregnant although it had crossed her mind more often as her girth increased and as people around her suggested that she was pregnant. […] The young mother, her family, and the likely father adapted themselves rapidly to the new situation and some cattle changed hands to prove that there were no hard feelings. […] A plausible explanation for this pregnancy is that spermatozoa gained access to the reproductive organs via the injured gastrointestinal tract. It is known that spermatozoa do not survive long in an environment with a low pH, but it is also known that saliva has a high pH and that a starved person does not produce acid under normal circumstances. […] The fact that the son resembled the father excludes an even more miraculous conception.

  • Katharina Detzel (above) was committed to a mental hospital in 1907 for performing abortions and sabotaging a railroad line in political protest. While confined in the asylum, she constructed a life-size doll with male features, using straw from her mattress. The doll provided her with venting and comfort: she punched it when she was angry and danced with it when she felt happy.
  • In Atlantic City until the 1970s there was a show, dangerous and cruel, that was all the rage: diving into the sea from 18 meters high with horses. (Thanks, Roberto!)
  • Flash news: we have two noses.

  • The facial expression these young ladies are making is called ahegao, and many of you may know that it derives from Japanese hentai in which upturned/crossed eyes, stuck-out tongue and flushing cheeks are used to represent the height of sexual arousal. This pose, which is allusive while not being explicitly pornographic, moved from comic books to the Internet in a short time, becoming a widespread phenomenon on social media. Interestingly, tracing the history of the ahegao face reveals that it owes all its fortune to Japanese censorship.
  • Let’s stay in the Land of the Rising Sun: in 1803 some strange, UFO-like vessel ran aground on the shores of Japan. Inside was a beautiful red-haired teenager, dressed in strange clothes and unable to speak Japanese. The inhabitants, convinced that she might be a princess from a distant country, and wanting to avoid trouble with the local authorities, decided… to throw her back into the sea. Truth or legend?
  • An incredible resource for all artists, and more: J.G. Heck’s Iconographic Encyclopedia, published between 1849 and 1851, has been digitized in a new interactive form that includes more than 13,000 spectacular illustrations. (In each section, the “Plates only” button at the top allows you to exclude the text.)

  • Above is one of the small robots appearing in the science fiction film Silent Running (1972), capable of moving in a funny, almost human-like manner. A very thorough article reveals their “secret”: they were basically costumes operated by legless actors. Director Douglas Trumbull, who at the time was accused of being insensitive about employing disabled people, recalls in interviews that the four actors actually had a great time and were handsomely paid for their job.
  • Speaking of cinema, here is some utter genius at work. Starting in the 1930s, director Melton Barker made the same film, The Kidnappers Foil, more than 130 times, using the same script and largely the same shots. The subject was basic: a little girl named Betty Davis is kidnapped on her birthday; the town’s children, attracted by the reward put up by the missing girl’s father, organize several search parties; they finally succeed in rescuing her, and in the finale a big party erupts in which the children perform dances and musical numbers.
    What, then, was Barker’s gimmick? The film was played exclusively by the children residing in the town where he was staying at the time. Parents gladly paid a small fee for their children to be immortalized on film; within a few weeks of the filming being finished, the movie was ready to be shown in local movie theaters, to the delight of all the residents.
    In this way, moving from town to town across the United States, Melton Barker was able to sustain himself for 40 years. In 2012 the few surviving prints of The Kidnappers Foil were added to the National Film Registry for preservation as historically significant; you can see some versions of the film on this website.
  • In Lviv, during the Nazi occupation, many Polish intellectuals managed to avoid concentration camps and receive additional food rations by undertaking a singular job: louse-feeder. (Thanks, Roberto!)

  • The story of the leg of Santa Anna — a Mexican politician, general, dictator, and president — is almost as adventurous as that of its owner. The Generalisimo had been wounded in 1838 by cannon fire during a battle against the French, and had suffered an amputation below his left knee. He had initially buried the leg on his property in Vera Cruz. Once he became president of Mexico again in 1842, he had his leg exhumed and taken, in a luxurious ornate carriage, to Mexico City; there he had prepared an elaborate state funeral for his amputated limb, burying it in a small glass coffin. Two years later, the Santa Anna government was overthrown and a mob of rioters, in addition to destroying the president’s statues, dug up his leg and dragged it through the streets until there was nothing left of it.
    After regaining power, during the Battle of Cerro Gordo in 1847, Santa Anna was attacked by surprise while he was having lunch. Fleeing in a hurry, he left behind his wooden leg: it was collected as a trophy by U.S. infantry soldiers. That is why the prosthesis pictured above is still in the Illinois State Military Museum today.
  • And let’s talk about animals: in Brazil, in the small seaside town of Laguna, residents and dolphins have been joining forces to fish for 140 years. Only there is some doubt that it is the dolphins who have trained the humans.
  • News from last year but which for some reason I find touching: some archaeologists are hunting for the grave of Nancy, an elephantess who escaped from a traveling circus in 1891.
  • And finally, here is a spider doing a cartwheel (via Bestiale):

That’s all, see you next time!

Living Machines: Automata Between Nature and Artifice

Article by Laura Tradii
University of Oxford,
MSc History of Science, Medicine and Technology

In a rather unknown operetta morale, the great Leopardi imagines an award competition organised by the fictitious Academy of Syllographers. Being the 19th Century the “Age of Machines”, and despairing of the possibility of improving mankind, the Academy will reward the inventors of three automata, described in a paroxysm of bitter irony: the first will have to be a machine able to act like a trusted friend, ready to assist his acquaintances in the moment of need, and refraining from speaking behind their back; the second machine will be a “steam-powered artificial man” programmed to accomplish virtuous deeds, while the third will be a faithful woman. Considering the great variety of automata built in his century, Leopardi points out, such achievements should not be considered impossible.

In the eighteenth and nineteenth century, automata (from the Greek, “self moving” or “acting of itself”) had become a real craze in Europe, above all in aristocratic circles. Already a few centuries earlier, hydraulic automata had often been installed in the gardens of palaces to amuse the visitors. Jessica Riskin, author of several works on automata and their history, describes thus the machines which could be found, in the fourteenth and fifteenth century, in the French castle of Hesdin:

“3 personnages that spout water and wet people at will”; a “machine for wetting ladies when they step on it”; an “engien [sic] which, when its knobs are touched, strikes in the face those who are underneath and covers them with black or white [flour or coal dust]”.1

26768908656_4aa6fd60f9_o

26768900716_9e86ee1ded_o

In the fifteenth century, always according to Riskin, Boxley Abbey in Kent displayed a mechanical Jesus which could be moved by pulling some strings. The Jesus muttered, blinked, moved his hands and feet, nodded, and he could smile and frown. In this period, the fact that automata required a human to operate them, instead of moving of their own accord as suggested by the etymology, was not seen as cheating, but rather as a necessity.2

In the eighteenth century, instead, mechanics and engineers attempted to create automata which could move of their own accord once loaded, and this change could be contextualised in a time in which mechanistic theories of nature had been put forward. According to such theories, nature could be understood in fundamentally mechanical terms, like a great clockwork whose dynamics and processes were not much different from the ones of a machine. According to Descartes, for example, a single mechanical philosophy could explain the actions of both living beings and natural phenomena.3
Inventors attempted therefore to understand and artificially recreate the movements of animals and human beings, and the mechanical duck built by Vaucanson is a perfect example of such attempts.

With this automaton, Vaucanson purposed to replicate the physical process of digestion: the duck would eat seeds, digest them, and defecate. In truth, the automaton simply simulated these processes, and the faeces were prepared in advance. The silver swan built by John Joseph Merlin (1735-1803), instead, imitated with an astonishing realism the movements of the animal, which moved (and still moves) his neck with surprising flexibility. Through thin glass tubes, Merlin even managed to recreate the reflection of the water on which the swan seemed to float.

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MT05uNFb6hY

Vaucanson’s Flute Player, instead, played a real flute, blowing air into the instruments thanks to mechanical lungs, and moving his fingers. On a similar vein, at the beginning of the nineteenth century, a little model of Napoleon was displayed in the United Kingdom: the puppet breathed, and it was covered in a material which imitated the texture of skin.  The advertisement for its exhibition at the Dublin’s Royal Arcade described it as a ‘splendid Work of Art’, ‘produc[ing] a striking imitation of human nature, in its Form, Color, and Texture, animated with the act of Respiration, Flexibility of the Limbs, and Elasticity of Flesh, as to induce a belief that this pleasing and really wonderful Figure is a living subject, ready to get up and speak’.4

The attempt to artificially recreate natural processes included other functions beyond movement. In 1779, the Academy of Sciences of Saint Petersburg opened a competition to mechanise the most human of all faculties, language, rewarding who would have succeeded in building a machine capable of pronouncing vowels. A decade later, Kempelen, the inventor of the famous Chess-Playing Turk, built a machine which could pronounce 19 consonants (at least according to Kempelen himself).5

In virtue of their uncanny nature, automata embody the tension between artifice and nature which for centuries has animated Western thought. The quest not only for the manipulation, but for the perfecting of the natural order, typical of the Wunderkammer or the alchemical laboratory, finds expression in the automaton, and it is this presumption that Leopardi comments with sarcasm. For Leopardi, like for some of his contemporaries, the idea that human beings could enhance what Nature already created perfect is a pernicious misconception. The traditional narrative of progress, according to which the lives of humans can be improved through technology, which separates mankind from the cruel state of nature, is challenged by Leopardi through his satire of automata. With his proverbial optimism, the author believes that all that distances humans from Nature can only be the cause of suffering, and that no improvement in the human condition shall be achieved through mechanisation and modernisation.

This criticism is substantiated by the fear that humans may become victims of their own creation, a discourse which was widespread during the Industrial Revolution. Romantic writer Jean Paul (1763-1825), for example, uses automata to satirise the society of the late eighteenth century, imagining a dystopic world in which machines are used to control the citizens and to carry out even the most trivial tasks: to chew food, to play music, and even to pray.6

The mechanical metaphors which were often used in the seventeenth century to describe the functioning of the State, conceptualised as a machine formed of different cogs or institutions, acquire here a dystopic connotation, becoming the manifestation of a bureaucratic, mechanical, and therefore dehumanising order. It is interesting to see how observations of this kind recur today in debates over Artificial Intelligence, and how, quoting Leopardi, a future is envisioned in which “the uses of machines [will come to] include not only material things, but also spiritual ones”.

A closer future than we may think, since technology modifies in entirely new directions our way of life, our understanding of ourselves, and our position in the natural order.

____________

[1]  Jessica Riskin, Frolicsome Engines: The Long Prehistory of Artificial Intelligence.
[2]  Grafton, The Devil as Automaton: Giovanni Fontana and the Meanings of a Fifteenth-Century Machine, p.56.
[3]  Grafton, p.58.
[4]  Jennifer Walls, Captivating Respiration: the “Breathing Napoleon”.
[5]  John P. Cater, Electronically Speaking: Computer Speech Generation, Howard M. Sams & Co., 1983, pp. 72-74.
[6]  Jean Paul, 1789. Discusso in Sublime Dreams of Living Machines: the Automaton in the European Imagination di Minsoo Kang.

Rubberdoll: nei panni di una bionda

Vi sono talvolta delle estreme frange dell’erotismo che prestano il fianco ad una facile ironia. Eppure, appena smettiamo di guardare gli altri dall’alto in basso o attraverso il filtro dell’umorismo, e cerchiamo di comprendere le emozioni che motivano certe scelte, spesso ci sorprendiamo a riuscirci perfettamente. Possiamo non condividere il modo che alcune persone hanno elaborato di esprimere un disagio o un desiderio, ma quei disagi e desideri li conosciamo tutti.

Parliamo oggi di una di queste culture underground, un movimento di limitate dimensioni ma in costante espansione: il female masking, o rubberdolling.

article-2565884-1BBF77C100000578-390_306x423

article-2565884-1BBF77BA00000578-747_306x423

15090430562_496960d21d_b

15118766580_c79d86c53d_b
Le immagini qui sopra mostrano alcuni uomini che indossano una pelle in silicone con fattezze femminili, completa di tutti i principali dettagli anatomici. Se il vostro cervello vi suggerisce mille sagaci battute e doppi sensi, che spaziano da Non aprite quella porta alle bambole gonfiabili, ridete ora e non pensateci più. Fatto? Ok, procediamo.

I female masker sono maschi che coltivano il sogno di camuffarsi da splendide fanciulle. Potrebbe sembrare una sorta di evoluzione del travestitismo, ma come vedremo è in realtà qualcosa di più. Il fenomeno non interessa particolarmente omosessuali e transgender, o perlomeno non solo, perché buona parte dei masker sono eterosessuali, a volte perfino impegnati in serie relazioni familiari o di coppia.
E nei costumi da donna non fanno nemmeno sesso.

Ma andiamo per ordine. Innanzitutto, il travestimento.
L’evoluzione delle tecniche di moulding e modellaggio del silicone hanno reso possibile la creazione di maschere iperrealistiche anche senza essere dei maghi degli effetti speciali: la ditta Femskin ad esempio, leader nel settore delle “pelli femminili” progettate e realizzate su misura, è in realtà una società a conduzione familiare. In generale il prezzo delle maschere e delle tute è alto, ma non inarrivabile: contando tutti gli accessori (corpo in silicone, mani, piedi, maschera per la testa, parrucca, riempitivi per i fianchi, vestiti), si può arrivare a spendere qualche migliaio di euro.
Per accontentare tutti i gusti, alcune maschere sono più realistiche, altre tendono ad essere più fumettose o minimaliste, quasi astratte.

Cattura

Cattura2

Alla domanda “perché lo fanno?”, quindi, la prima risposta è evidentemente “perché si può”.
Quante volte su internet, in televisione, o sfogliando una rivista scopriamo qualcosa che, fino a pochi minuti prima, nemmeno sapevamo di desiderare così tanto?
Senza dubbio la rete ha un peso determinante nel far circolare visioni diverse, creare comunità di condivisione, confondere i confini, e questo, nel campo della sessualità, significa che la fantasia di pochi singoli individui può incontrare il favore di molti – che prima di “capitare” su un particolare tipo di feticismo erano appunto ignari di averlo inconsciamente cercato per tutta la vita.

Trasformarsi in donna per un periodo di tempo limitato è un sogno maschile antico come il mondo; eppure entrare nella pelle di un corpo femminile, con tutti gli inarrivabili piaceri che si dice esso sia in grado di provare, è rimasto una chimera fin dai tempi di Tiresia (l’unico che ne fece esperienza e, manco a dirlo, rimase entusiasta).
Indossare un costume, per quanto elaborato, non significa certo diventare donna, ma porta con sé tutto il valore simbolico e liberatorio della maschera. “L’uomo non è mai veramente se stesso quando parla in prima persona – scriveva Oscar Wilde ne Il Critico come Artista –, ma dategli una maschera e vi dirà la verità“. D’altronde lo stesso concetto di persona, dunque di identità, è strettamente collegato all’idea della maschera teatrale (da cui esce la voce, fatta per-sonare): questo oggetto, questo secondo volto fittizio, ci permette di dimenticare per un attimo i limiti del nostro io quotidiano. Se un travestito rimane sempre se stesso, nonostante gli abiti femminili, un female masker diviene invece un’altra persona – o meglio, per utilizzare il gergo del movimento, una rubberdoll.

Secrets-of-the-Living-Dolls

15017381596_12bdd57c4c

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA
Nel documentario di Channel 4 Secret Of The Living Dolls, questo sdoppiamento di personalità risulta estremamente evidente per uno dei protagonisti, un pensionato settantenne rimasto vedovo che, avendo ormai rinunciato alla ricerca di un’anima gemella, ha trovato nel suo alter ego femminile una sorta di compensazione platonica. Lo vediamo versare abbondante talco sulla pelle in silicone, indossarla faticosamente, applicare maschera e parrucca, e infine rimirarsi allo specchio, rapito da un’estasi totale: “Non riesco a credere che dietro questa donna bellissima vi sia un vecchio di settant’anni, ed è per questo che lo faccio“, esclama, perso nell’idillio. Se nello specchio vedesse sempre e soltanto il suo corpo in deperimento, la vita per lui sarebbe molto più triste.
Un altro intervistato ammette che il suo timore era quello che nessuna ragazza sexy sarebbe mai stata attratta da lui, “così me ne sono costruito una“.

Alcuni female masker sono davvero innamorati del loro personaggio femminile, tanto da darle un nome, comprarle vestiti e regali, e così via. Ce ne sono di sposati e con figli: i più fortunati hanno fatto “coming out”, trovando una famiglia pronta a sostenerli (per i bambini, in fondo, è come se fosse carnevale tutto l’anno), altri invece non ne hanno mai parlato e si travestono soltanto quando sono sicuri di essere da soli.
Provo un senso di gioia, un senso di evasione“, rivela un’altra, più giocosa rubberdoll nel documentario di Channel 4. “Lo faccio per puro divertimento. È come l’estensione di un’altra persona dentro di me che vuole soltanto uscire e divertirsi. La cosa divertente è che la gente mi chiede: cosa fai quando ti travesti? E la risposta è: niente di speciale. Alle volte mi scatto semplicemente delle foto da condividere sui siti di masking, altre volte mi succede soltanto di essere chi voglio essere per quel giorno“.

article-2565884-1BBF77DD00000578-428_634x514

15277214355_d32957bb06_o

15137317252_54d52030e5_o

14844506297_d84be79e67_o
Al di fuori delle comunità online e delle rare convention organizzate in America e in Europa, il feticismo delle rubberdoll è talmente bizzarro da non mancare di suscitare ilarità nemmeno all’interno dei comuni spazi dedicati alle sessualità alternative. Un feticismo che non è del tutto o non soltanto sessuale, ma che sta in equilibrio fra inversione di ruoli di genere, travestitismo e trasformazione identitaria. E una spruzzatina di follia.
Eppure, come dicevamo all’inizio, se la modalità adottata dai female masker per esprimere una loro intima necessità può lasciare perplessi, questa stessa necessità è qualcosa che conosciamo tutti. È il desiderio di bellezza, di essere degni d’ammirazione – della propria ammirazione innanzitutto -, la sensazione di non bastarsi e la tensione ad essere più di se stessi. La voglia di vivere più vite in una, di essere più persone allo stesso tempo, di scrollarsi di dosso il monotono personaggio che siamo tenuti a interpretare, pirandellianamente, ogni giorno. È una fame di vita, se vogliamo. E in fondo, come ricorda una rubberdoll in un (prevedibilmente sensazionalistico) servizio di Lucignolo, “noi siamo considerati dei pervertiti. […] Ci sono moltissime altre persone che fanno di peggio, e non hanno bisogno di mettersi la maschera“.

15073996787_2c9cb667d8_o

Ecco l’articolo di Ayzad che ha ispirato questo post. Se volete vedere altre foto, esiste un nutritissimo Flickr pool dedicato al masking.

Street Monkeys

In Jakarta, capital of Indonesia, urban overpopulation entails extreme poverty. In order to survive, people have to come up with new ways of gathering attention. When Finnish photographer Perttu Saska saw what was going on at the corner of every street, he decided to document it in a series entitled A Kind of You.

Lolita130x105cm-

Painija130x105cm

peikko130x110cm

These monkeys are exhibeted at traffic lights or in the alleys, dressed up in baby clothes and forced to wear doll’s heads that give them an unsettling, almost human appearance. They are trained to ask for charity, and sometimes to enact sad little performances like riding a small bike, or applying makeup while looking in a mirror.

Keinuja130x105cm-1

70x55cm2

70x55cm1

40x50cm-1-1

The phenomenon of topeng monyet (“masked monkeys”) is certainly not a sight to behold: various animal rights associations are fighting to save the 350 macaques that are exploited, undernourished, often abused and locked up inside minuscule cages every night, in appalling sanitary conditions. There have already been some good results, as reported on this article.

110x85cm-6

110x90cm-8-1

110x85cm-4-1

110x85cm-2

70x55cm3-1

But Saska’s photographs have the merit of raising questions not only on animal cruelty. The little monkeys, chained by their neck, with their dirty and torn clothes, with those doll heads (probably found in a dump), look like a grotesque and transfixed version of their owners: poor people, choked by the chains of misery, who live by their wits because there’s nothing else to do.

Saving the monkeys is important and righteous; it’s difficult to see how the ones on the other end of the leash will be saved.

Jokeri130x110cm-1

Halfface130x105cm-7-A-Kind-of-You-2-1

130x160cm-A-Kind-of-You2

110x85cm-1-1

This is what is really disturbing in Saska’s work: the feeling we are actually looking in a mirror, at “a kind of you”.

110x85cm-5

Here is Perttu Saska‘s official website.

(Thanks, Stefano!)

Hans Bellmer

Hans Bellmer nel 1926 possedeva una compagnia pubblicitaria, quando, disgustato dalla piega che stava prendendo il nazionalsocialismo e prevedendo la prossima ascesa del partito Nazista al potere, decise che non avrebbe collaborato in alcun modo alla nascita del nuovo stato tedesco. Iniziò così un suo progetto artistico sovversivo, che gli sarebbe costato l’esilio ma che l’avrebbe portato ad essere accolto fra le braccia dei surrealisti francesi di Breton. Quello che era iniziato, nelle intenzioni di Bellmer, come una parodia e un attacco all’idea nazista del perfetto corpo ariano, però, divenne in brevissimo tempo qualcosa di più profondo, una vera e propria finestra sulle forme archetipiche del desiderio e dell’ossessione.

Lavorando in isolamento, Bellmer costruì alcune bambole a grandezza naturale, che avevano delle giunture a sfera simili a quelle che aveva potuto osservare in un paio di manichini in legno del ‘500, conservati al Bode Museum di Berlino. Diede alle bambole le fattezze di giovani ragazzine. Le bambole potevano essere articolate e composte in maniera differente, e Bellmer cominciò a fotografarle in diversi assetti e posizioni.

Così nacque la raccolta pubblicata anonima nel 1934 sotto il titolo di Die Puppe (“La bambola”); il lavoro di Bellmer fu dichiarato “degenerato” dal partito Nazista, ma dopo la fuga a Parigi e la consacrazione sul giornale surrealista Minotaure arrivò la fama. Eppure Bellmer abbandonò le sue bambole, e si dedicò per il resto della vita a disegni e fotografie erotiche, più o meno espressamente surrealiste; è come se quel primo progetto avesse sondato già gli abissi, e tutta l’opera successiva dell’artista tedesco fosse un più leggero rimuginare sul pozzo di nere acque dischiuso dalle bambole.

Le bambole di Hans Bellmer, infatti, sono fra le più estreme e toccanti rappresentazioni del desiderio sessuale e della violenza, il vero lato oscuro dell’erotismo così come teorizzato da Bataille (e preconizzato da Sade). Ci mostrano il corpo femminile, centro focale dell’ossessione, come un insieme di membra dislocate senza volto, puri oggetti dell’inconscio desiderio di violazione. La passione che anima le fantasie più nere si risolve in un tentativo di smembramento e di riconfigurazione, come se il corpo femminile nascondesse un segreto, e occorresse violare, frugare e ricombinare la carne per riuscire a coglierlo.

Eppure, nonostante la brutalità di queste “dissezioni”, le bambole sembrano quasi uno specchio sui nostri sogni infranti; sulla tristezza e impotenza del desiderio maschile, che non può concepire il mistero del corpo. La dolce sensualità delle bambole, infatti, resiste a qualsiasi esplosione, rifiuta di essere posseduta.

Il corpo è paragonabile ad una frase che vi spinge a disarticolarla, affinché, attraverso una serie di anagrammi infiniti, si ricompongano i suoi veri contenuti.

(Hans Bellmer)

Robert Morgan

Robert Morgan è un filmmaker e animatore inglese, dalla fantasia macabra e sfrenata. I suoi surreali lavori in stop-motion hanno vinto numerosi premi, e se avete un po’ di tempo vale davvero la pena di darci un’occhiata: ecco il sito ufficiale di Robert Morgan.

Vi proponiamo qui il suo eccezionale cortometraggio The Separation, la cui trama rimanda chiaramente a Inseparabili (1988) di David Cronenberg, ma che contamina il suo modello con un’atmosfera malsana, morbosa eppure, nel finale, stranamente commovente.

[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ltIG3v_ySuU]

(Grazie, Paolo!)

Tari Nakagawa

Le macabre e malinconiche necro-ninfe dell’artista giapponese Tari Nakagawa sono davvero il lato oscuro delle Barbie, tristi e scheletriche bambole anatomiche ormai perdute.

Fragili, eteree, malate e spesso in decomposizione: queste bambole create dallo scultore giapponese hanno qualcosa di indicibilmente triste e al tempo stesso poetico.

Nonostante i loro sguardi persi e drammatici, ormai irrimediabilmente segnati da una fine imminente, le bambole sembrano sospese in una dimensione di dolore e di nostalgia, come se si aggrappassero agli ultimi brandelli di vita che rimangono nei loro corpi sofferenti.

Le sensazioni e le emozioni che suscitano sono molteplici. Il loro stesso status di bambole rimanda all’infanzia, ai giochi spensierati e innocenti, eppure queste sculture conoscono il tempo, il disfacimento, la morte, e non ne fanno segreto. Sono bambole “adulte”, che sembrano avere davvero un’anima.

Il blog di Tari Nakagawa (in giapponese, diverse immagini).

FAQ: Che cos’è un tupilak?

Inauguriamo qui una nuova rubrica. “FAQ”, acronimo di “Frequently Asked Questions”, sarà lo spazio in cui noi di Bizzarro Bazar rispondiamo alle domande che ci vengono rivolte più frequentemente. Si tratta, ve ne accorgerete, di quesiti comuni, che tutti noi ci poniamo quotidianamente, e siamo felici di poter offrire questo servizio utile e culturalmente encomiabile. Se avete richieste su argomenti che vorreste vedere trattati su “FAQ”, non esitate a domandare.

Partiamo da una delle domande più gettonate, una di quelle che assillano l’uomo moderno: che cos’è un tupilak?

Nella tradizione della Groenlandia, per Tupilaq, o Tupilak, si intende una piccola statuetta rappresentante gli spiriti dei Tupilaq o di altre creature mitiche. Originariamente il Tupilak era composto di materiali differenti, quali ad esempio parti di animali, capelli umani, addirittura parti prese da cadaveri di bambini. Gli stregoni raccoglievano questi pezzi in un posto segreto ed isolato, li legavano assieme, e operavano incantesimi sulle figurine. Permettevano anche che le figurine succhiassero l’energia dai loro organi genitali.


Dopo questa procedura, il Tupilak era pronto per essere immerso nel mare e mandato ad uccidere un nemico. L’affare era però rischioso, perché se la vittima era dotata di poteri magici più forti di chi inviava il Tupilak, poteva essere in grado di capovolgere l’incantesimo, e l’effetto boomerang avrebbe potuto essere fatale per il creatore del piccolo killer.


Nessuno ha mai trovato un vero Tupilak. Essendo stati assemblati con materiali deperibili, buttati in mare – e di base, essendo comunque degli artefatti assolutamente segreti – non stupisce il fatto che non ne sia rimasto nemmeno un esemplare. Quando i primi europei arrivarono in Groenlandia, e sentirono le leggende sui Tupilak, chiesero di poterne vedere alcuni. I locali cominciarono quindi a scolpire alcune statuette per mostrare loro a cosa assomigliassero. Questa tradizione continua ancora oggi, e il commercio di Tupilak ricavati dalla pietra, dall’osso o dal legno permane come uno dei maggiori business locali finalizzati al turismo.

Reborn Dolls

Nata all’inizio degli anni ’90, e presto divenuta di vaste proporzioni, la “moda” delle Reborn Dolls si è da tempo affermata anche da noi. Si tratta di bambole modificate a mano, attraverso un lungo processo artistico, per renderle il più realistiche possibili.

evie2

marnie2

Il processo di modificazione, chiamato reborning, consta in varie fasi in cui la pelle viene dipinta in successivi strati, per simulare la presenza delle vene e donare la giusta texture alla cute della bambola; i capelli e le sopracciglia vengono inserite una alla volta mediante un apposito ago, e le narici vengono lasciate aperte per permettere al bambolotto di “respirare”. Alcuni reborners (gli artisti di questa pratica) arrivano ad aggiungere all’interno della bambola un simulatore di battito cardiaco.

amyLouise1

canopy046

Il reborning, nato come forma d’arte di nicchia, è divenuto col tempo sempre più popolare, tanto che diverse industrie di settore hanno cominciato a produrre dei kit di bambole da assemblare e modificare.

Donna-Lee-originals-Corbin_(1)

Donna-Lee-Emmaline-comparison

Queste bambole iperrealistiche sono trattate come dei veri e propri bambini. La maggioranza dei collezionisti di Reborn Dolls infatti è costituita da donne, spesso anziane, che hanno perso un figlio, non ne possono avere, o hanno subito il trauma dell’aborto. Le Reborn Dolls sono quindi accudite, coccolate, messe a letto, nutrite, perfino portate in giro in carrozzina, come se fossero vive e reali. Anche l’acquisto online è usualmente proposto come un’adozione, più che una mera compravendita, e le bambole sono spesso corredate da finti certificati di nascita.

laura3

resized_DSC07937

Nella polemica che inevitabilmente è sorta, molti psicologi hanno sottolineato l’importanza terapeutica che potrebbero rivestire queste bambole nell’elaborazione del lutto: altri sostengono che sostituire il figlio morto con una bambola non sia di alcuna utilità per chi deve venire a patti con una triste realtà. Accudirle, infatti, potrebbe addirittura favorire la produzione di ossitocina, proprio come un bambino vero, causando così nella “madre” un forte attaccamento.

IMAG014

PC199383Crushed

Che sia una dolce illusione, o una fissazione maniacale, sembra proprio che delle reborn dolls si avvertisse il bisogno: le vendite su internet sono in costante crescita, nonostante il prezzo di certo non popolare (si va dai 300 alle diverse migliaia di dollari).

P.S. Se vi pare che queste bambole abbiano qualcosa di sinistro e inquietante, niente paura. Questo effetto è chiamato uncanny valley: secondo questa teoria, gli oggetti inanimati che raffigurano esseri viventi susciterebbero la nostra simpatia solo fino ad una determinata soglia di realismo, oltre la quale sarebbero percepiti come “troppo reali” e innaturali, e provocherebbero repulsione.