The premature babies of Coney Island

Once upon a time on the circus or carnival midway, among the smell of hot dogs and the barkers’ cries, spectators could witness some amazing side attractions, from fire-eaters to bearded ladies, from electric dancers to the most exotic monstrosities (see f.i. some previous posts here and here).
Beyond our fascination for a time of naive wonder, there is another less-known reason for which we should be grateful to old traveling fairs: among the readers who are looking at this page right now, almost one out of ten is alive thanks to the sideshows.

This is the strange story of how amusement parks, and a visionary doctor’s stubbornness, contributed to save millions of human lives.

Until the end of XIX Century, premature babies had little or no chance of survival. Hospitals did not have neonatal units to provide efficient solutions to the problem, so the preemies were given back to their parents to be taken home — practically, to die. In all evidence, God had decided that those babies were not destined to survive.
In 1878 a famous Parisian obstetrician, Dr. Étienne Stéphane Tarnier, visited an exhibition called Jardin d’Acclimatation which featured, among other displays, a new method for hatching poultry in a controlled, hydraulic heated environment, invented by a Paris Zoo keeper; immediately the doctor thought he could test that same system on premature babies and commissioned a similar box, which allowed control of the temperature of the newborn’s environment.
After the first positive experimentations at the Maternity Hospital in Paris, the incubator was soon equipped with a bell that rang whenever the temperature went too high.
The doctor’s assistant, Pierre Budin, further developed the Tarnier incubator, on one hand studying how to isolate and protect the frail newborn babies from infectious disease, and on the other the correct quantities and methods of alimentation.

Despite the encouraging results, the medical community still failed to recognize the usefulness of incubators. This skepticism mainly stemmed from a widespread mentality: as mentioned before, the common attitude towards premature babies was quite fatalist, and the death of weaker infants was considered inevitable since the most ancient times.

Thus Budin decided to send his collaborator, Dr. Martin Couney, to the 1896 World Exhibition in Berlin. Couney, our story’s true hero, was an uncommon character: besides his knowledge as an obstetrician, he had a strong charisma and true showmanship; these virtues would prove fundamental for the success of his mission, as we shall see.
Couney, with the intent of creating a bit of a fuss in order to better spread the news, had the idea of exhibiting live premature babies inside his incubators. He had the nerve to ask Empress Augusta Victoria herself for permission to use some infants from the Charity Hospital in Berlin. He was granted the favor, as the newborn babies were destined to a certain death anyway.
But none of the infants lodged inside the incubators died, and Couney’s exhibition, called Kinderbrutanstalt (“child hatchery”) immediately became the talk of the town.

This success was repeated the following year in London, at Earl’s Court Exhibition (scoring 3600 visitors each day), and in 1898 at the Trans-Mississippi Exhibition in Omaha, Nebraska. In 1900 he came back to Paris for the World Exhibition, and in 1901 he attended the Pan-American Exhibition in Buffalo, NY.

L'edificio costruito per gli incubatori a Buffalo.

The incubators building in Buffalo.

The incubators at the Buffalo Exhibition.

But in the States Couney met an even stronger resistence to accept this innovation, let alone implementing it in hospitals.
It must be stressed that although he was exhibiting a medical device, inside the various fairs his incubator stand was invariably (and much to his disappointment) confined to the entertainment section rather than the scientific section.
Maybe this was the reason why in 1903 Couney took a courageous decision.

If Americans thought incubators were just some sort of sideshow stunt, well then, he would give them the entertainment they wanted. But they would have to pay for it.

Infant-Incubators-building-at-1901-Pan-American-Exposition

Baby_incubator_exhibit,_A-Y-P,_1909

Couney definitively moved to New York, and opened a new attraction at Coney Island amusement park. For the next 40 years, every summer, the doctor exhibited premature babies in his incubators, for a quarter dollar. Spectators flowed in to contemplate those extremely underweight babies, looking so vulnerable and delicate as they slept in their temperate glass boxes. “Oh my, look how tiny!“, you could hear the crowd uttering, as people rolled along the railing separating them from the aisle where the incubators were lined up.

 

In order to accentuate the minuscule size of his preemies, Couney began resorting to some tricks: if the baby wasn’t small enough, he would add more blankets around his little body, to make him look tinier. Madame Louise Recht, a nurse who had been by Couney’s side since the very first exhibitions in Paris, from time to time would slip her ring over the babies’ hands, to demonstrate how thin their wrists were: but in reality the ring was oversized even for the nurse’s fingers.

Madame Louise Recht con uno dei neonati.

Madame Louise Recht with a newborn baby.

Preemie wearing on his wrist the nurse’s sparkler.

Couney’s enterprise, which soon grew into two separate incubation centers (one in Luna Park and the other in Dreamland), could seem quite cynical today. But it actually was not.
All the babies hosted in his attractions had been turned down by city hospitals, and given back to the parents who had no hope of saving them; the “Doctor Incubator” promised families that he would treat the babies without any expense on their part, as long as he could exhibit the preemies in public. The 25 cents people paid to see the newborn babies completely covered the high incubation and feeding expenses, even granting a modest profit to Couney and his collaborators. This way, parents had a chance to see their baby survive without paying a cent, and Couney could keep on raising awareness about the importance and effectiveness of his method.
Couney did not make any race distinction either, exhibiting colored babies along with white babies — an attitude that was quite rare at the beginning of the century in America. Among the “guests” displayed in his incubators, was at one point Couney’s own premature daughter, Hildegarde, who later became a nurse and worked with her father on the attraction.

Nurses with babies at Flushing World Fair, NY. At the center is Couney’s daughter, Hildegarde.

Besides his two establishments in Coney Island (one of which was destroyed during the 1911 terrible Dreamland fire), Couney continued touring the US with his incubators, from Chicago to St. Louis, to San Francisco.
In forty years, he treated around 8000 babies, and saved at least 6500; but his endless persistence in popularizing the incubator had much lager effects. His efforts, on the long run, contributed to the opening of the first neonatal intensive care units, which are now common in hospitals all around the world.

After a peak in popularity during the first decades of the XX Century, at the end of the 30s the success of Couney’s incubators began to decrease. It had become an old and trite attraction.
When the first premature infant station opened at Cornell’s New York Hospital in 1943, Couney told his nephew: “my work is done“. After 40 years of what he had always considered propaganda for a good cause, he definitively shut down his Coney Island enterprise.

Martin Arthur Couney (1870–1950).

The majority of information in this post comes from the most accurate study on the subject, by Dr. William A. Silverman (Incubator-Baby Side Shows, Pediatrics, 1979).

(Thanks, Claudia!)

Robert Ripley

Una vita alla ricerca del bizzarro

Nato nel 1890, Robert Ripley aveva cominciato la sua carriera come fumettista, collaborando ad alcune strisce del New York Globe. All’età di 29 anni fece il suo primo viaggio intorno al mondo, e tornò completamente cambiato: la scoperta di culture differenti, località ed usanze esotiche l’aveva talmente intrigato che decise di dedicare la sua vita alla ricerca del bizzarro e dell’inusitato.


Così cambiò il titolo della sua striscia in Believe It Or Not! (“Che ci crediate o no!”), e attraverso i fumetti cominciò a raccontare le più strane e incredibili storie provenienti da tutto il mondo e ad illustrare i prodigi della natura meno conosciuti.


Il successo della rubrica crebbe vertiginosamente durante tutti gli anni ’20, e Ripley divenne presto una delle figure pubbliche più famose e conosciute; ma dietro a questo eclatante risultato c’era un altro uomo, che restò per sempre nell’ombra.

Infatti Ripley, deciso ad essere il più attendibile possibile, nel 1923 ingaggiò Norbert Pearlroth perché si occupasse della ricerca. Quest’uomo era uno studioso eccezionale e di sicuro uno dei maggiori artefici del successo della rubrica.

Norbert parlava 11 lingue, e lavorava 10 ore al giorno per sei giorni alla settimana restando chiuso nella sala di lettura della New York Public Library: si stima che abbia esaminato 7000 libri all’anno, rimanendo a lavorare nello staff di Believe It Or Not fino al 1975, leggendo un totale di più di 350.000 libri. Da contratto, doveva riuscire a trovare ogni settimana esattamente 24 curiosità da inserire nella rubrica, e lavorò praticamente in completo anonimato per tutta la sua vita.


Nel frattempo Ripley aveva stretto una collaborazione con il magnate della stampa William Hearst (quello a cui faceva il verso Orson Welles in Quarto potere, per intenderci), che aveva deciso di finanziare i suoi celebri viaggi attorno al mondo alla ricerca di stranezze e pezzi rari da collezione. Nel 1930 Believe It Or Not sbarcò alla radio, con uno show che sarebbe durato per 14 anni. Il pubblico cominciò a inviare migliaia di segnalazioni alla redazione, spesso raccontando di storie bizzarre accadute nel proprio circondario; le testimonianze erano tutte soppesate e verificate accuratamente (spesso da Pearlroth in persona) prima di venire pubblicate. Con i suoi 18 milioni di lettori in tutto il mondo, Ripley riceveva circa 3000 lettere alla settimana, tanto che si dice che la sua posta superasse per volume quella della Casa Bianca.


La popolarità di Ripley era alle stelle: la Warner Bros produsse perfino una dozzina di cortometraggi Believe It Or Not da proiettare prima dei film, nelle sale cinematografiche. Nel 1932 Ripley ha visitato ben 201 paesi del mondo. Decide allora di mettere in mostra l’impressionante quantità di stranezze che ha accumulato in tutti quei viaggi, ed apre il primo Odditorium a Chicago. Vi espone, fra vitelli a due teste impagliati, strumenti di tortura e feticci esotici, anche la sua collezione di tsantsa (le teste dei nemici “ristrette” dagli indios dell’Amazzonia) che è la più grande del mondo. Per metà wunderkammer e per metà sideshow, sospeso in un limbo sempre in bilico fra l’accuratezza di un antropologo culturale e la faccia tosta dell’imbonitore da fiera, l’Odditorium ha un immediato successo e in meno di 8 anni Ripley ne apre altri cinque in varie città degli Stati Uniti.


Durante la Seconda Guerra Mondiale Ripley smette di viaggiare e si dedica a opere di carità. Nel dopoguerra però torna alla carica con una mossa azzardata ma lungimirante: punta tutto sulla neonata televisione, e trasferisce il programma radiofonico su piccolo schermo, inaugurando la serie tv di Believe It Or Not. Fa in tempo a registrare 13 episodi, prima di morire per cancro nel 1949.


Oggi la franchise Believe It Or Not conta 32 musei in tutto il mondo (Bizzarro Bazar ha visitato quello di New York, in questo articolo), e la Ripley Entertainment Inc. è un colosso dell’intrattenimento: oltre a decine di parchi di divertimento, detiene a sua volta le franchise di Madame Tussauds e delle attrazioni relative al Guinness dei Primati. Con il marchio Ripley vengono pubblicati libri, calendari, poster, videogame, trasmissioni televisive… e, ancora oggi, la famosa striscia a fumetti da cui tutto ebbe inizio.