Bizzarro Bazar Web Series: Episode 3

In the 3rd episode of the Bizzarro Bazar Web Series we talk about some scientists who tried to hybridize monkeys with humans, about an incredible raincoat made of intestines, and about the Holy Foreskin of Jesus Christ.
[Be sure to turn on English subtitles.]

If you like this episode be sure to subscribe to the channel, and most of all spread the word. Enjoy!

Written & Hosted by Ivan Cenzi
Directed by Francesco Erba
Produced by Ivan Cenzi, Francesco Erba, Theatrum Mundi & Onda Videoproduzioni

Dolphinophilia

Art by Dr Louzou.

[…] by common accord they glide towards one another underwater, the female shark using its fins, Maldoror cleaving the waves with his arms; and they hold their breath in deep veneration, each one wishing to gave for the first time upon the other, his living portrait. When they are three yards apart they suddenly and spontaneously fall upon one another like two lovers and embrace with dignity and gratitude, clasping each other as tenderly as brother and sister. Carnal desire follows this demonstration of friendship. Two sinewy thighs press tightly against the monster’s viscous flesh, like two leeches; and arms and fins are clasped around the beloved object, while their throats and breasts soon form one glaucous mass amid the exhalations of the seaweed; amidst the tempest which was continuing to rage; by the light of lightning-flashes; with the foaming waves for marriage-bed; borne by an undersea current and rolling on top of one another down into the unknown deeps, they joined in a long, chaste and ghastly coupling!… At last I had found one akin to me… from now on I was no longer alone in life…! Her ideas were the same as mine… I was face to face with my first love!

I always loved this sulfurous description of the intercourse between Maldoror and a shark, found in the second chant of Lautréamont’s masterpiece.
It came back to mind when a friend recently suggested I look up Malcolm Brenner. You know you’ve found an interesting guy, when Wikipedia introduces him as an “author, journalist, and zoophile“.
Malcolm, it seems, has a thing for dolphins.

Now, zoophilia is a very delicate topic — I tried to address it in this post (Italian only) — because it doesn’t only touch on sensitive areas of sexuality, but it also concerns animal rights. I’m returning on the subject in order to tell two very different stories, which I find particularly remarkable: they are both about sexual encounters between humans and dolphins.
The first one is, indeed, Brennan’s.

I advise you to invest 15 minutes of your time and watch the extraordinary Dolphin Lover, embedded below, which chronicles the unconventional love story between Malcom and a female dolphin named Dolly.
The merit of this short documentary lies in the sensitivity with which it approaches its subject: a man who was abused at a tender age, still visibly marked by what he believes has been a wonderful sentimental and spiritual connection with the animal.
Viewing the video certainly poses an intriguing variety of questions: besides the intrinsic problems of zoophilia (the likelihood of inter-species love, the validity of including zoophiliac tendencies within a pathological spectrum, the issue of consent in animals), some daring points are made, such as the parallellism that Malcom puts forward with inter-racial marriages. “150 years ago, black people were considered degenerate subspecies of the human being, and at the time miscegenation was a crime in many states, as today inter-species sex or bestiality is a crime in many states. And I’m hoping that in a more enlightened future zoophilia will be no more regarded as controversial or harmful than interracial sex is today.

The documentary, and Brenner’s book Wet Goddess (2009), caused some stir, as you would expect. “Glorifying human sexual interactions with other species is inappropriate for the health and well being of any animal. It puts the dolphin’s own health and social behavioral settings at risk”, said expert Dr. Hertzing to the Huff Post.

But if you think the love story between Malcom and Dolly is bizarre, there’s at least another one that surpasses it in weirdness. Let me introduce you to Margaret Lovatt.

Margaret Lovatt. Foto: Matt Pinner/BBC

When she was younger, Margaret — who has no inclination or interest in zoophilia at all — was the target of a male dolphin’s erotic attention. And there would be nothing surprising in this: these mammals are notorious for their sexual promiscuity with trainers and other humans who are swimming with them. At times, they even get aggressive in their sexual advances (proving, if there ever was any need to, that consent is a stricly human concern).

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4Ml5IjwLNe4

In other words, the fact that a dolphin tried to hit on her is anything but unusual. But the context in which this happened is so delightfully weird, and her story so fascinating, that it deserves to be told.

Virgin Islands, early 1960s.
Doctor John C. Lilly was at the peak of his researches (which, many decades later, earned him a way cooler Wiki description than Brennan’s). This brilliant neuroscientist had already patented several manometers, condensers and medical meters; he had studied the effects of high altitude on brain physiology; he had created a machine to visualize brain activity through the use of electrodes (this kind of stimulation, still used today, is called “Lilly’s wave”). Intrigued by psychoanalisis, he also had already abandoned more conventional areas of scientific investigation to invent sensory deprivation tanks.


Built in 1954 and initally intended as a way to study brain neurophysiology in the absence of external stimuli, isolation tanks had unexpectedly turned out to be an altered-state-inducing tool, prompting a sort of deep and meditative trance. Lilly began to see them as spiritual or psychic vessels: “I made so many discoveries that I didn’t dare tell the psychiatric group about it at all because they would’ve said I was psychotic. I found the isolation tank was a hole in the universe.” This discovery led to the second part of his career, that saw him become an explorer of consciousness.

The early Sixties were also the time when John Lilly began to experiment with LSD, took interest in aliens and… in dolphins.

The scientist was convinced that these mammals were extremly intelligent, and he had discovered that they seemed able to replicate some human sounds. Wouldn’t it be nice, Lilly thought,if we could communicate with cetaceans? What enlightening concepts would their enormous brains teach us? He published his ideas in Man and Dolphin (1961), which instantly became a best-seller; in the book he prophetized a future in which dolphins would widen our perspective on history, philosophy and even world politics (he was confident a Cetacean consulting Seat could be established at the United Nations).


Lilly’s next step was to raise funds for a project aimed at teaching dolphins to speak English.
He tried to involve NASA and the Navy — as you do, right? —, and succeded. Thus Lilly founded the Communication Research Institute, a marine secret laboratory on the caraibic island of St. Thomas.

This is the context in which, in 1964, our Margaret began working with Peter, one of the three dolphins being studied at Lilly’s facility. Margaret moved in to live inside the dolphinarium for three months, in contact with Peter for six days a week. Here she gave English lessons to the animal, for instance teaching him how to articulate the words “Hello Margaret”.
‘M’ was very difficult […]. I worked on the ‘M’ sound and he eventually rolled over to bubble it through the water. That ‘M’, he worked on so hard.
But Peter also showed to be curious about many other things: “He was very, very interested in my anatomy. If I was sitting here and my legs were in the water, he would come up and look at the back of my knee for a long time. He wanted to know how that thing worked and I was so charmed by it.

Spending so much time on intimate terms with the dolphin introduced Lovatt to the cetacean’s sexual needs: “Peter liked to be with me. He would rub himself on my knee, or my foot, or my hand.” At that point, in order not to interrupt their sessions, Margaret began to manually satisfy Peter’s necessities, as they arose. “I allowed that. I wasn’t uncomfortable with it, as long as it wasn’t rough. It would just become part of what was going on, like an itch – just get rid of it, scratch it and move on. And that’s how it seemed to work out. […] It wasn’t sexual on my part. Sensuous perhaps. It seemed to me that it made the bond closer. Not because of the sexual activity, but because of the lack of having to keep breaking. And that’s really all it was. I was there to get to know Peter. That was part of Peter.

As months went by, John Lilly gradually lost interest in dolphins. He increasingly committed himself to his scientific research on psychedelics, at the time of great interest for the Government, but this eventually became a personal rather than a professional interest:  as recalled by a friend, “I saw John go from a scientist with a white coat to a full blown hippy.”

Psychedelic counter-culture icons: Ginsberg, Leary & Lilly.

The lab lost its fundings, the dolphins were moved to another aquarium in Miami, and Margaret didn’t hear about Peter until a few weeks later. “I got that phone call from John Lilly. John called me himself to tell me. He said Peter had committed suicide.
Just like Dolly in Malcolm Brenner’s account, Peter too had decided to stop breathing (which is voluntary in dolphins).

After more than a decade, in the late 1970s, Hustler magazine published a sexploitation piece about Margaret Lovatt and her “sexual” relationship with Peter, which included an explicit cartoon. Unfortunately, despite all attempts to put her story back within the frame of those pioneering experiments, Margaret was marked for many years as the woman who made love to dolphins.
It’s a bit uncomfortable,” she declared in a Guardian interview. “The worst experiment in the world, I’ve read somewhere, was me and Peter. That’s fine, I don’t mind. But that was not the point of it, nor the result of it. So I just ignore it.

Towards the end of his career, John Lilly became convinced that some gigantic cosmic entities (which he visualized during his acid trips) were responsible for all inexplicable coincidences.
Appropriately enough, just as I was finalizing this post, I stumbled upon one of these coincidences. I opened the New York Times website to find this article: a team of scientists from the University of Chile just published a paper, claiming to have trained an orca to repeat some English words.

So Lilly’s dream of communicating with cetaceans lives on.
Brennan’s dream, on the other hand, is still controversial, as are zoophile associations such as the German ZETA (“Zoophile Engagement for Tolerance and Enlightenment”), who believe in a future without any sexual barrier between species.
A future where one can easily make love to a dolphin without awakening anyone’s morbid curiosity.
Without anyone necessarily writing about it in a blog of oddities.

(Thanks, Fabri!)

The Carney Landis Experiment

Suppose you’re making your way through a jungle, and in pulling aside a bush you find yourself before a huge snake, ready to attack you. All of a sudden adrenaline rushes through your body, your eyes open wide, and you instantly begin to sweat as your heartbeat skyrockets: in a word, you feel afraid.
But is your fear triggering all these physical reactions, or is it the other way around?
To make a less disquieting example, let’s say you fall in love at first sight with someone. Are the endorphines to be accounted for your excitation, or is your excitation causing their discharge through your body?
What comes first, physiological change or emotion? Which is the cause and which is the effect?

This dilemma was a main concern in the first studies on emotion (and it still is, in the field of affective neurosciences). Among the first and most influential hypothesis was the James-Lange theory, which maintained the primacy of physiological changes over feelings: the brain detects a modification in the stimuli coming from the nervous system, and it “interprets” them by giving birth to an emotion.

One of the problems with this theory was the impossibility of obtaining clear evidence. The skeptics argued that if every emotion arises mechanically within the body, then there should be a gland or an organ which, when conveniently stimulated, will invariably trigger the same emotion in every person. Today we know a little bit more of how emotions work, in regard to the amygdala and the different areas of cerebral cortex, but at the beginning of the Twentieth Century the objection against the James-Lange theory was basically this — “come on, find me the muscle of sadness!

In 1924, Carney Landis, a Minnesota University graduate student, set out to understand experimentally whether these physiological changes are the same for everybody. He focused on those modifications that are the most evident and easy to study: the movement of facial muscles when emotion arises. His study was meant to find repetitive patterns in facial expressions.

To understand if all subjects reacted in the same way to emotions, Landis recruited a good number of his fellow graduate students, and began by painting their faces with standard marks, in order to highlight their grimaces and the related movement of facial muscles.
The experiment consisted in subjecting them to different stimuli, while taking pictures of their faces.

At first volunteers were asked to complete some rather harmless tasks: they had to listen to jazz music, smell ammonia, read a passage from the Bible, tell a lie. But the results were quite discouraging, so Landis decided it was time to raise the stakes.

He began to show his subjects pornographic images. Then some medical photos of people with horrendous skin conditions. Then he tried firing a gunshot to capture on film the exact moment of their fright. Still, Landis was having a hard time getting the expressions he wanted, and in all probability he began to feel frustrated. And here his experiment took a dark turn.

He invited his subjects to stick their hand in a bucket, without looking. The bucket was full of live frogs. Click, went his camera.
Landis encouraged them to search around the bottom of the mysterious bucket. Overcoming their revulsion, the unfortunate volunteers had to rummage through the slimy frogs until they found the real surprise: electrical wires, ready to deliver a good shock. Click. Click.
But the worst was yet to come.

The experiment reached its climax when Landis put a live mouse in the subject’s left hand, and a knife in the other. He flatly ordered to decapitate the mouse.
Most of his incredulous and stunned subjects asked Landis if he was joking. He wasn’t, they actually had to cut off the little animal’s head, or he himself would do it in front of their eyes.
At this point, as Landis had hoped, the reactions really became obvious — but unfortunately they also turned out to be more complex than he expected. Confronted with this high-stress situation, some persons started crying, others hysterically laughed; some completely froze, others burst out into swearing.

Two thirds of the paricipants ended up complying with the researcher’s order, and carried out the macabre execution. In any case, the remaining third had to witness the beheading, performed by Landis himself.
As we said, the subjects were mainly other students, but one notable exception was a 13 years-old boy who happened to be at the department as a patient, on the account of psychological issues and high blood pressure. His reaction was documented by Landis’ ruthless snapshots.

Perhaps the most embarassing aspect of the whole story was that the final results for this cruel test — which no ethical board would today authorize — were not even particularly noteworthy.
Landis, in his Studies of Emotional Reactions, II., General Behavior and Facial Expression (published on the Journal of Comparative Psychology, 4 [5], 447-509) came to these conclusions:

1) there is no typical facial expression accompanying any emotion aroused in the experiment;
2) emotions are not characterized by a typical expression or recurring pattern of muscular behavior;
3) smiling was the most common reaction, even during unpleasant experiences;
4) asymmetrical bodily reactions almost never occurred;
5) men were more expressive than women.

Hardly anything that could justify a mouse massacre, and the trauma inflicted upon the paritcipants.

After obtaining his degree, Carney Landis devoted himself to sexual psychopatology. He went on to have a brillant carreer at the New York State Psychiatric Institute. And he never harmed a rodent again, despite the fact that he is now mostly remembered for this ill-considered juvenile experiment rather than for his subsequent fourty years of honorable research.

There is, however, one last detail worth mentioning.
Alex Boese in his Elephants On Acid, underlines how the most interesting figure of all this bizarre experiment went unnoticed: the fact that two thirds of the subjects, although protesting and suffering, obeyed the terrible order.
And this percentage is in fact similar to the one recorded during the infamous Milgram experiment, in which a scientist commanded the subjects to inflict an electric shock to a third individual (in reality, an actor who pretended to receive the painful discharge). In that case as well, despite the ethical conflict, the simple fact that the order came from an authority figure was enough to push the subjects into carrying out an action they perceived as aberrant.

The Milgram experiment took place in 1961, almost forty years after the Landis experiment. “It is often this way with experiments — says Boese — A scientis sets out to prove one thing, but stumbles upon something completely different, something far more intriguing. For this reason, good researchers know they should always pay close attention to strange events that occur during their experiments. A great discovery might be lurking right beneath their eyes – or beneath te blade of their knife.

On facial expressions related to emotions, see also my former post on Guillaume Duchenne (sorry, Italian language only).

Stoned spiders

1948, University of Tubingen, Germany.
Zoologist H. M. Peters was frustrated. He was conducting a photographic research on the way orb-weaver spiders build their web, but he had encountered a problem: the arachnids he was studying insisted on performing this task of astounding engineering only during the night hours, very early in the morning. This schedule, besides forcing him to get up at an ungodly hour, made photographic documentation quite hard, as the spiders preferred to move in total darkness.
One day Peters decided to call on a collegue, young pharmacologist Dr. Peter N. Witt, for assistance. Would it be possible to somehow drug the spiders, so they would change this routine and start weaving their webs when the sun was already up?

Witt had never had any experience with spiders, but he soon realized that administering tranquilizers or stimulants to the arachnids was easier than he thought: the little critters, constantly thirsty for water, quickly learned to drink from his syringe.
The results of this experiment, alas, turned out to be pretty worthless to zoologist Peters. The spiders kept on building their webs during the night, but that was not the worst part of it. After swallowing the medicine, they weren’t even able to weave a decent web: as if they were drunk, the arachnids produced a twisted mesh, unworthy of being photographed.
After this experience, a disheartened Peters abandoned his project.
In Dr. Witt’s mind, instead, something had clicked.

Common spiders (Araneidae) are all but “common” when it comes to weaving. They build a new web every morning, and if byt he end of the day no insect is trapped, they simply eat it. This way, they are able to recycle silk proteins for weeks: during the first 16 days without food, the webs look perfect. Whe nthe spider gets really hungry, it begins sparing the energy by building a wider-meshes web, suitable to catch only larger insects (the spider is in need of a substantial meal).
After all, for a spider the web isn’t just a way to gather food, but an essential instrument to relate with the surrounding world. Most of these arachnids are almost totally blind, and they use the vibrations of the strands like a radar: from the perceived movements they can understand what kind of insect just snagged itself on the web, and if it is safe for them to approach it; they can notice if even a single thread has broken, and they confidently head in the right direction to repair it; they furthermore use the web as a means of communication in mating rituals, where the male spider remains on the outer edges and rythmically pinches the strings to inform the female of its presence, in order to seduce her without being mistaken for a juicy snack.

peter-witt

During his experimentation with chemicals, Dr. Witt noticed that there seemed to be a significative correspondence between the administered substance and the aberrations that the spiderweb showed. He therefore began feeding the spiders different psychoactive drugs, and registering the variations in their weaving patterns.
Dr. Witt’s study, published in 1951 and revised in 1971, was limited to statistical observation, without attempting to provide further interpretations. Yet the results could lead to a fascinating if not very orthodox reading: it looked like the spiders were affected in much the same way humans react to drugs.

webs

Under the influence of weed, they started regularly building their web, but were soon losing interest once they got to the outer rings; while on peyote or magic mushrooms, the arachnids movements became slower and heavier; after being microdosed with LSD, the web’s design became geometrically perfect (not unlike the kaleidoscopic visions reported by human users), while more massive doses completely inhibited the spiders’ abilities; lastly, caffeine produced out of control, schizoid results.

Spiderweb after high doses of LSD-25.

Clearly this “humanized” interpretation is not scientific to say the least. In fact, what really interested Witt was the possibility of using spiders to ascertain the presence of drugs in human blood or urine, as they had proved sensitive to minimal concentrations, which could not be instrumentally detected at the time. His research continued for decades, and Witt went from being a pharmacologist to being an entomology authority. He was able to recognize his little spliders one by one just by looking at their webs, and his fascination for these invertebrates never faded.
He kept on testing their skills in several other experiments, by altering their nervous system through laser stimulation, administering huge quantities of barbiturics, and even sending them in orbit. Even in the absence of gravity, in what Witt called “a masterpiece in adaptation”, after just three days in space the spiders were able to build a nearly perfect web.

Near the end of the Seventies, Witt discontinued his research. In 1984 J. A. Nathanson re-examined Witt’s data, but only in relation to the effects of caffeine.
In 1995 Witt saw his study come back to life when NASA successfully repeated it, with the help of statistic analysis software: the research showed that spiders could be used to test the toxicity of various chemicals instead of mice, a procedure that could save time and money.

Anyway, there is not much to worry regarding the fate of these invertebrates.
Spiders are among the very few animals who survived the biggest mass extinction that ever took place, and they are able to resist to atmospheric conditions which would be intolerable to the majority of insects. Real rulers of the world since millions of years, they will still be here a long time — even after our species has run its course.

Ivanov e lo Scimpanzuomo

616296853

Nell’Isola del Dr. Moreau, di H.G. Wells, il folle scienziato che dà il titolo al romanzo insegue il progetto di abbattere le barriere fra gli esseri umani e gli animali; con gli strumenti della vivisezione e dei trapianti, vuole sconfiggere gli istinti bestiali e trasformare tutte le belve feroci in innocui servitori dell’umanità. Certo, detto così il piano a lungo termine sembra piuttosto nebuloso, e capiamo che in realtà è la vertigine della ricerca a muovere e motivare l’allucinato Dottore:

Io mi ponevo una domanda, studiavo i metodi per ottenere una risposta e trovavo invece una nuova domanda. Era mai possibile? Voi non potete immaginare quanto ciò sia di sprone ad un ricercatore della verità e quale passione intellettuale nasca in lui. Voi non potete immaginare gli strani e indescrivibili diletti di tali smanie intellettuali.
La cosa che sta qui davanti a voi non è più un animale, una creatura, ma un problema. […] Quello che io volevo, la sola cosa che io volessi, era trovare il limite estremo della plasticità delle forme viventi.

Gli esperimenti di Moreau non hanno, nel romanzo, un lieto fine. Ma sarebbe possibile, almeno in via teorica, l’ibridazione fra l’uomo e le altre specie animali?

Fino a poco tempo fa, si credeva che i rapporti sessuali interspecifici fossero poco diffusi in natura: alcune recenti ricerche, però, sembrerebbero indicare nell’ibridazione un fattore più significativo di quanto sospettato per l’evoluzione delle specie.
Questo accade fra piccoli insetti, quando ad esempio nasce una “nuova” farfalla, risultato dell’incrocio di specie differenti, che mostra colorazioni impercettibilmente modificate rispetto ai genitori; ma ovviamente, per animali di stazza maggiore le cose sono più complicate. Se escludiamo i rari episodi di “stupro” dei rinoceronti da parte degli elefanti, o gli incroci fra grizzly e orsi polari, nei mammiferi gli accoppiamenti fra specie diverse sono stati osservati quasi esclusivamente in cattività (anche se questo non significa che non esistano in natura comportamenti sessualmente opportunistici). E in cattività, infatti, hanno visto la luce tutti quegli ibridi dai nomi bislacchi e un po’ ridicoli, che ricordano un fantasioso libro per bambini: il ligre, il tigone, il leopone, il zebrallo, e via dicendo (al riguardo, Wiki ospita una breve lista).

Zebroid

Questi animali ibridi, creati o meno dall’uomo, sterili o fertili, esistono soltanto in virtù della vicinanza e compatibilità di codice genetico fra i genitori. Il mulo nasce perché cavalla e asino hanno un patrimonio cromosomico similare fra di loro, e la cosa interessante è che la differenza nel numero dei cromosomi non sembra costituire una barriera, una volta che i geni si “assomigliano” abbastanza.

Se ci guardassimo attorno con l’occhio famelico del Dr. Moreau, alla ricerca del candidato ideale da ibridare con l’essere umano, gli animali su cui il nostro sguardo si poserebbe immediatamente sarebbero i cugini primati. Gli scimpanzé, per esempio, condividono con noi il 99,4% del patrimonio genetico, tanto che c’è chi discute sull’opportunità o meno di farli rientrare nella categoria tassonomica dell’Homo. Quindi, se proprio volessimo cominciare gli esperimenti, sarebbe necessario partire dalle scimmie.

ivanov

Alla stessa conclusione, anche se a quel tempo ancora non si parlava di DNA o cromosomi, era arrivato il dottor Il’ja Ivanovič Ivanov. Biologo, ricercatore, professore ordinario dell’Università di Kharkov, Ivanov era un’autorità nel campo dell’inseminazione artificiale. All’inizio degli anni ’20 aveva dimostrato come si poteva far accoppiare un singolo stallone con 500 cavalle, portando la tecnica della riproduzione “assistita” a livelli stupefacenti per l’epoca.

Ivanov conduceva contemporaneamente altri tipi di sperimentazioni: era interessato all’idea dell’ibridazione, e fu tra i primi ad incrociare con successo ratti e topi, cavie e conigli, zebre ed asini, bisonti e mucche, e molti altri animali. La genetica muoveva allora i suoi primi passi, ma già prometteva bene, tanto che anche i vertici del PCUS si erano mostrati interessati alla creazione di nuove specie domestiche. A quanto ci racconta lo storico Kirill O. Rossianov, però, Ivanov voleva spingere i suoi esperimenti ancora oltre – desiderava essere il primo scienziato della Storia a creare, mediante inseminazione artificiale, un ibrido uomo-scimmia.

Muovendosi con circospezione, un po’ per conoscenze private e un po’ attraverso richieste ufficiali, Ivanov era riuscito a farsi accordare dall’Istituto Pasteur di Parigi il permesso di utilizzare per i suoi esperimenti la stazione primatologica di Kindia, nella Guinea Francese. Dopo circa un anno di corteggiamento dei vari burocrati del governo sovietico, nel 1925 finalmente lo scienziato riuscì a far stanziare un finanziamento alla sua ricerca da parte dell’Accademia delle Scienze dell’URSS per l’equivalente di 10.000$. Così, a marzo dell’anno successivo, Ivanov partì speranzoso per la Guinea.

Ma le cose andarono male fin dall’inizio: appena arrivato, comprese subito che il laboratorio di primatologia non ospitava alcuno scimpanzé sessualmente maturo. Non fu prima del febbraio dell’anno successivo che Ivanov riuscì a procedere con i primi tentativi di inseminazione artificiale: assistito da suo figlio, Ivanov inserì dello sperma umano nell’utero di due esemplari di scimpanzé e nel giugno del 1927 inoculò lo sperma in una terza femmina della colonia. Di chi fosse il seme umano non è dato sapere, l’unica cosa certa è che non era né di Ivanov né di suo figlio. Nessuno dei tre tentativi di inseminazione andò a buon fine, e Ivanov ripartì, probabilmente amareggiato, portandosi a Parigi tutte le scimmie che poteva (tredici esemplari).

Mentre era in Guinea, Ivanov aveva anche cercato di trovare delle volontarie umane disposte a farsi inseminare da sperma di scimmia – anche qui, stranamente, senza alcuna fortuna.
Tornato in Russia, però, non si diede per vinto e nel 1929, sempre spalleggiato dall’Accademia, ricominciò a pianificare i suoi esperimenti, riuscendo addirittura a costituire una commissione apposita con il sostegno della Società dei Biologi Materialisti. Avrebbe avuto bisogno di cinque volontarie donne: fece in tempo a reclutarne soltanto una, disposta – nel caso l’esperimento fosse andato a buon fine – a concepire un figlio metà uomo e metà scimmia. Proprio in quel momento arrivò da Parigi una terribile notizia: l’ultimo esemplare maschio fra quelli riportati in Europa dalla Guinea, un orango, era morto. Prima di poter mettere le mani su un nuovo gruppo di scimmie, avrebbe dovuto aspettare almeno un altro anno.

the-family-yeti

Nel frattempo, però, il vento era cambiato all’interno dell’Accademia: i finanziamenti vennero revocati, Ivanov fu criticato per il suo operato e in men che non si dica, nel 1930, venne epurato dal regime stalinista. Esiliato in Kazakistan, vi morì dopo due anni.

Come dimostra la storia di Ivanov, meno di un secolo fa la barriera per questo tipo di ricerche era l’acerbo sviluppo della tecnologia; oggi, ovviamente, il principale ostacolo sarebbe di stampo etico. E così  per il momento lo “scimpanzuomo“, com’è stato battezzato, rimane ancora un’ipotesi fantascientifica.

Robert E. Cornish

cornish1

Robert E. Cornish, classe 1903, era un bambino prodigio. Si laureò con lode all’Università della California a soli 18 anni, e conseguì il dottorato a 22. Eppure talvolta una mente brillante può smarrirsi all’inseguimento di sfide perse in partenza e di scommesse impossibili: di sicuro, pur con tutte le sue doti, il Dr. Cornish non eccelleva per lungimiranza.

Così, appena accettato un posto all’Istituto di Biologia Sperimentale presso l’Università, immediatamente si impelagò in una serie di ricerche che non avevano un futuro, come ad esempio un progetto per un paio di lenti che permettessero di leggere il giornale sott’acqua. (Se pensate – a ragione – che questa sia un’idea bislacca, date un’occhiata ai brevetti di cui abbiamo parlato in quest’articolo).

Nel 1932, a ventisette anni, Cornish cominciò ad essere ossessionato dall’idea di poter rianimare i cadaveri. Mise a punto una tavola basculante, una sorta di letto rotante fissato su un fulcro, su cui avrebbe dovuto essere legato il morto da riportare in vita. Ovviamente il decesso doveva essere accaduto da poco, e senza gravi danni agli organi interni: secondo le sue stesse parole, “facendolo muovere in su e in giù, mi aspetto una circolazione artificiale del sangue”.

revive_dead

Erano gli anni ’30, e non era più facile come un tempo procurarsi dei corpi freschi su cui sperimentare come facevano i “rianimatori di cadaveri” di una volta (vedi questo articolo), ma Cornish riuscì comunque a testare la sua tavola su vittime di attacchi cardiaci, morti per annegamento o folgorati. Purtroppo, nessuno di essi tornò in vita dopo essere stato sbatacchiato in alto e in basso. In un rapporto confidenziale per l’Università della California, Cornish segnalava che dopo un’ora passata a basculare il cadavere di un uomo “il suo volto sembrava essersi improvvisamente riscaldato, gli occhi erano tornati a brillare, e si potevano osservare delle deboli pulsazioni in prossimità della trachea”. Un po’ pochino per affermare che la tecnica fosse efficace.

2013-12-27 17.31.46

Così Cornish decise che, prima di ritentare sugli uomini, sarebbe stato più saggio mettere a punto il suo metodo sugli animali. Nel 1934 iniziò gli esperimenti che gli avrebbero dato la fama e che, allo stesso tempo, avrebbero decretato la fine della sua carriera.

Le vittime sacrificali di queste nuove ricerche erano cinque fox terrier, chiamati (neanche troppo ironicamente) Lazarus I, II, III, IV e V. Per ucciderli, Cornish usò una miscela di azoto ed etere, asfissiandoli fino alla completa cessazione del respiro e del battito cardiaco. Dichiarati clinicamente morti, i cani venivano poi sottoposti alle tecniche sperimentali di rianimazione, che prevedevano – oltre al basculamento –  delle iniezioni di adrenalina ed eparina (un anticoagulante), mentre Cornish aspirava dell’ossigeno da una cannuccia e lo soffiava nella bocca aperta del cane morto.

cornish3

cornish2

cornish4

Lazarus I, II e III furono un buco nell’acqua, ostinandosi a rimanere deceduti. Ma ecco la sorpresa: nel 1934 e 1935, con Lazarus IV e V, qualcosa effettivamente successe. I cani ripresero conoscenza, e ritornarono a respirare e a vivere. Certo, i danni cerebrali che avevano subito erano irreparabili: i cani erano completamente ciechi e non riuscivano a stare in piedi da soli. Ma la stampa amplificò questo piccolo successo a dismisura, e in breve tempo Cornish acquistò la fama di novello Frankenstein, anche grazie al suo strabismo divergente che gli donava uno sguardo da vero e proprio scienziato pazzo.

lrg_dog_life

Nel 1935 anche Hollywood cercò di far cassa sulla popolare vicenda, con la realizzazione del (pessimo) film Life Returns, ispirato alle ricerche di Cornish: quest’ultimo compare in una scena del film, nei panni di se stesso, mentre esegue dal vero uno dei suoi esperimenti di “rivitalizzazione” di un cane.

Life_Returns_FilmPoster
Forse Cornish pensava che l’esposizione mediatica gli avrebbe consentito maggiori fondi e più libertà di ricerca, ma accadde l’esatto opposto. Questi esperimenti erano un po’ troppo estremi, perfino per la sensibilità del tempo, e l’Università della California di fronte alle proteste degli animalisti decise di bandire Cornish dal campus, e tagliò tutti i ponti con lui.

Ritiratosi nella sua casa di Berkeley, Cornish mantenne un basso profilo per tredici anni. Ogni tanto doveva calmare l’ostilità dei vicini, per via delle fughe di pecore e cani dal suo laboratorio, o per varie esalazioni di componenti chimici che appestavano l’aria e scrostavano la vernice dagli edifici della zona. Ma nel 1947, eccolo ritornare sulla ribalta, affermando di aver finalmente perfezionato la tecnica, e dichiarandosi pronto a resuscitare un condannato a morte. L’audace impresa sarebbe stata tentata, questa volta, senza l’aiuto di tavole basculanti (concetto che aveva ormai completamente abbandonato), ma grazie ad una macchina cuore-polmoni assemblata in maniera artigianale e quantomeno fantasiosa: era composta dall’aspiratore di un aspirapolvere, dal tubo di un radiatore, da una ruota d’acciaio, da alcuni cilindri e da un tubo di vetro contenente 60.000 occhielli per lacci da scarpa.

Robert_Cornish_02
Un detenuto del braccio della morte di San Quintino, Thomas McMonigle, condannato per l’omicidio di una ragazzina, si propose volontariamente come cavia – con l’intesa che, se anche l’esperimento fosse riuscito ed egli fosse sopravvissuto alla camera a gas grazie all’apparecchio di Cornish, sarebbe comunque rimasto in carcere.

article55885785-3-001
Le autorità della California negarono però nettamente la richiesta di Cornish di poter sperimentare con il corpo del condannato a morte. Con quest’ultima sconfitta, la sua ricerca non aveva più alcuna possibilità di continuare. Ritiratosi nuovamente a vita privata, sbarcò il lunario vendendo un dentifricio di sua invenzione, il “Dentifricio del Dottor Cornish”, fino alla sua morte improvvisa nel 1963.

Piccioni superstiziosi

Articolo a cura della nostra guestblogger Veronica Pagnani

superstizione-tradizionale-siciliana

Perché siamo convinti che compiere un determinato gesto possa propiziare l’avverarsi di un evento favorevole? Perché, nonostante la qualifica di “esseri viventi più intelligenti ed evoluti del pianeta”, gli uomini continuano ad essere superstiziosi? E ancora, sono solo gli esseri umani ad essere superstiziosi o è questa una caratteristica che ci accomuna anche con gli animali?

skinner

Sono queste le domande che B.F. Skinner, psicologo americano vissuto nel secolo scorso, si pose per gran parte della sua vita, influenzando i suoi studi che, in breve tempo, diedero esiti straordinari.

Le opere di Skinner sono tutt’oggi largamente valutate dalla comunità scientifica in quanto riportano un concetto mai espresso prima di allora: il condizionamento operante.

Il concetto di condizionamento operante è di per sé molto semplice ed implica il fatto che un animale riesca a rendersi conto che, per qualche ragione, ad una sua particolare azione seguirà un evento. Se l’evento atteso si verifica, ecco che l’animale si sentirà gratificato e sarà portato a ripetere all’occorrenza quella determinata azione. Ma come riuscì Skinner a rendere valida una tesi del genere?

skinner box

Anzitutto, progettò una gabbia (conosciuta oggi come Skinner’s box), la cui peculiarità era il possedere una leva che, una volta premuta, faceva scattare un meccanismo dispensatore di cibo. Gli animali, che venivano intrappolati all’interno della Skinner’s box , imparavano ben presto il “trucchetto” per ottenere cibo e lo utilizzavano ogni qual volta ne avessero avuto bisogno.

sk

Nel 1948, però, Skinner decise di rendere più interessante l’esperimento, immettendo nella gabbia un solo piccione e collegando il dispensatore di cibo non più ad una leva bensì ad un timer.

skinner-lab-work-30s

In un primo momento il piccione sembrò non curarsi particolarmente del meccanismo che ospitava la sua gabbia e che dispensava il cibo a intervalli casuali; col passare del tempo però, cominciò a manifestare comportamenti alquanto bizzarri. Skinner notò che il piccione, con insistenza, ripeteva il movimento che aveva fatto un attimo prima di ottenere il cibo. Anche altri piccioni, sottoposti in gabbie diverse allo stesso esperimento, cominciarono a comportarsi allo stesso modo: chi girava su se stesso, chi allungava il collo verso un angolo della gabbia, un altro piegava su la testa con uno scatto, un altro ancora sembrava spazzolare con il becco l’aria sopra il fondo della gabbia e altri due dondolavano la testa. Un’altra stranezza era data dal fatto che i piccioni perseveravano nel comportamento nonostante questi movimenti, per la maggior parte delle volte, non portassero ad alcun risultato. Si trattava effettivamente di un comportamento superstizioso, osservato per la prima volta negli animali. L’esperimento, pubblicato sul celeberrimo Journal of Experimental Psychology, viene comunemente ricordato come “Superstizione del piccione”.

Pchamber1

In verità, nonostante gli esiti straordinari dell’esperimento, Skinner aveva solo dimostrato che i piccioni possono maturare degli atteggiamenti superstiziosi, basati su una falsa correlazione; ma va anche ricordato che i piccioni hanno un cervello molto diverso da quello degli uomini. Il nuovo quesito a questo punto era: può un animale simile all’uomo sviluppare comportamenti superstiziosi?

Stivers-2-10-03-Pavlovs-dogs

Purtroppo Skinner non visse così a lungo da portare a termine anche questo esperimento; se ne occuparono due ricercatori dell’Università dell’Oklahoma, L. D. Devenport e F. A. Holloway, i quali decisero di prendere come cavie dei ratti.

tumblr_mdw38ruwkP1qae5dvo1_1280

Al pari dei piccioni, anche i ratti vennero immessi nelle Skinner’s box, ma al contrario dei primi, questi non si autoingannarono e continuarono a comportarsi normalmente. Devenport e Holloway scoprirono le motivazioni di tale risultato. Nel cervello dei ratti, così come in quello degli uomini, vi è un’area chiamata “ippocampo”, la quale aiuterebbe a cogliere le vere relazioni di causa-effetto. Ad avvalorare maggiormente questa tesi fu un secondo esperimento, in cui i ratti vennero dapprima danneggiati nell’ippocampo per mezzo di elettrodi, per poi essere nuovamente immessi nelle Skinner’s box. In questo caso, proprio come era successo ai piccioni, i ratti cominciarono a compiere dei gesti arbitrariamente associati alla somministrazione di cibo.

Devenport e Holloway conclusero che, molto probabilmente, il processo evolutivo ha fatto sì che molti mammiferi sviluppassero l’ippocampo proprio come una sorta di “protezione” verso gli inganni del mondo esterno.

Gray739-emphasizing-hippocampus

A questo punto gli studi, e gli esperimenti, potevano dirsi conclusi con successo. O forse no. Si sa, la curiosità umana non ha, e non avrà mai (si spera), fine. E fu proprio la curiosità e l’amore per il sapere a spingere Koichi Ono, dell’Università Konazawa di Tokio, a costruire una Skinner’s box, dotata di tre leve, in cui inserire non più cavie animali bensì esseri umani, in modo da sciogliere ogni dubbio riguardante la validità delle precedenti teorie formulate.

Anche in questo caso, all’interno della Skinner’s box, notiamo la presenza di un “meccanismo ingannevole”, ovvero un contatore collegato ad un timer. Agli studenti che, volontariamente, decisero di sottoporsi all’esperimento non venne detto nulla, se non che il loro obiettivo era di fare “più punti possibili”. Nell’arco di 40 minuti, una parte degli studenti pensò che l’unico metodo per fare punti doveva essere collegato alle leve, le quali vennero tirate in sequenze differenti, in modo da provare quale fosse la mossa esatta. Altri studenti, invece, capirono che le leve non avevano nulla a che fare con il contatore e, nella speranza di fare punti, cominciarono ad assumere gli atteggiamenti più stravaganti, come arrampicarsi sul tavolo, picchiare sul muro, sul contatore o saltare ripetutamente fino a toccare il soffitto.

L’esperimento di Ono, così come quello dei suoi colleghi, aveva dimostrato che anche l’uomo, nonostante la protezione dell’ippocampo, può assumere atteggiamenti superstiziosi.

Tutto ciò è veramente incredibile. Ancor più incredibile però, è l’ipotesi formulata da Danilo Mainardi, la quale sintetizza tutti i risultati raccolti e precedentemente esposti. Secondo Mainardi, il pensiero razionale ha sì portato l’uomo ad indagare per capire le cose della natura, ma al tempo stesso l’ha messo di fronte alla caducità delle cose terrene. L’irrazionalità, dunque, non dev’essere per forza stigmatizzata, anzi, nella giusta misura, può essere un modo per affrontare l’insensatezza delle nostre vite. Il gatto nero che attraversa la strada non ha davvero nulla a che fare con la vostra fortuna: ma, se davvero vi conforta, fate pure tutti i vostri scongiuri preferiti.

Gatto_nero_01

Nim Chimpsky

È possibile insegnare alle scimmie a comunicare con noi attraverso il linguaggio dei segni? È quello che voleva scoprire il dottor Herbert Terrace della Columbia University di New York quando, all’inizio degli anni ’70, diede avvio al suo rivoluzionario”progetto Nim”.

Nim Chimpsky era uno scimpanzé di due settimane, chiamato così per parodiare il nome di Noam Chomsky, linguista e intellettuale fra i più influenti del XX Secolo (chimp in inglese significa appunto scimpanzé).
Nato in cattività presso l’Institute of Primate Studies di Norman (Oklahoma), nel dicembre del 1973 Nim venne sottratto alle cure di sua madre, e affidato da Terrace a una famiglia umana: quella di Stephanie LaFarge, sua ex-allieva. L’intento era quello di crescere il cucciolo in tutto e per tutto come un essere umano, vestirlo come un bambino, trattarlo come un bambino, insegnargli le buone maniere, ma soprattutto cercare di fargli apprendere il linguaggio dei sordomuti.

L’idea di Terrace potrà sembrare un po’ folle e temeraria, ma va inserita in un contesto scientifico peculiare: la linguistica era agli albori, e da poco veniva associata all’etologia per comprendere se si potesse parlare di linguaggio vero e proprio anche nel caso degli animali. Lo stesso Chomsky faceva parte di quella fazione che sosteneva che il linguaggio fosse una caratteristica specifica e assolutamente unica dell’essere umano; secondo questa tesi, gli animali certamente comunicano fra di loro – e si fanno capire bene anche da noi! – ma non possono utilizzare una vera e propria sintassi, che sarebbe prerogativa della nostra struttura neurologica.
Se Nim fosse riuscito ad imparare il linguaggio dei segni, sarebbe stato un vero e proprio terremoto per la comunità scientifica.

Il professor Terrace però commise da subito un grave errore.
La famiglia a cui aveva affidato Nim non era effettivamente la più adatta per l’esperimento: nessuno dei figli della LaFarge era fluente nel linguaggio dei segni, e quindi nella prima fase della sua vita, quella più delicata per l’apprendimento, Nim non imparò granché; inoltre, la madre adottiva era un’ex-hippie con un’idea piuttosto liberale nell’educare i figli.
Nim finì per essere lasciato libero di scorrazzare per il parco, di mettere la casa sottosopra, e addirittura di fumarsi qualche spinello assieme ai “genitori”.
Quando Terrace si rese conto che non stava arrivando alcun questionario compilato, che certificasse i progressi del suo scimpanzé, comprese che l’esperimento era seriamente a rischio. Il clima indisciplinato e caotico di casa LaFarge metteva in pericolo l’intero studio.


Terrace decise quindi di incaricare una studentessa ventenne, Laura-Ann Petitto, dell’educazione di Nim.
Strappato per una seconda volta alla figura materna, lo scimpanzé venne trasferito in una residenza di proprietà della Columbia University, dove la Petitto cominciò un più rigido e intensivo programma di addestramento.
In poco tempo Nim imparò oltre 120 segni, e i suoi progressi cominciarono a fare scalpore. Conversava con i suoi maestri in maniera che sembrava prodigiosa, e in generale faceva mostra di un’intelligenza acuta, tanto da arrivare addirittura a mentire.

Ma ormai Nim non era già più un cucciolo, e con la giovane età cominciò a crescere di mole e soprattutto di forza. I suoi muscoli erano potenti come quelli di due maschi umani messi assieme, e spesso Nim non era in grado di misurare la violenza di un suo gesto: gli stessi giochi che qualche mese prima erano spensierati, diventavano per gli addestratori sempre più pericolosi perché lo scimpanzé non si rendeva conto della sua forza.
Con lo sviluppo sessuale e la maturazione verso l’età adulta, inoltre, crebbe anche la sua aggressività: la Petitto venne attaccata diverse volte, due delle quali in maniera molto grave. I morsi di Nim in un’occasione le lacerarono la faccia, costringendola a 37 punti di sutura, e in un’altra le recisero un tendine.

La tensione psicologica era insopportabile, e la Petitto decise di lasciare l’esperimento… e di lasciare Terrace, con il quale aveva cominciato una relazione sentimentale.
Joyce Butler, una studentessa di vent’anni, entrò a sostituire la Petitto come terza madre adottiva di Nim. Anche lei fu più volte attaccata dalla scimmia, e la difficoltà di reperire fondi fece infine decidere a Terrace di dichiarare concluso l’esperimento, e smantellare il progetto dopo solo quattro anni.

Qui cominciò un vero e proprio calvario per il povero Nim. Egli non aveva infatto mai avuto contatti con altri primati, essendo sempre vissuto con gli umani: quando gli scienziati lo riportarono all’Institute of Primate Studies, Nim era completamente terrorizzato dai suoi simili e ci vollero diversi uomini per staccarlo da Joyce Butler, alla quale si era avvinghiato, per essere rinchiuso nella gabbia.
Per “lo scimpanzé che sapeva parlare”, abituato a mangiare a tavola in compagnia degli esseri umani e a correre libero nel parco, la prigionia fu uno shock terribile. Ma le cose erano destinate a peggiorare, perché l’istituto decise di trasferirlo in un centro di ricerca scientifico in cui si faceva sperimentazione sugli animali.

Rinchiuso in una gabbia ancora più angusta, di fianco a decine di altre scimmie terrorizzate in attesa di essere inoculate con virus e antibiotici, il futuro di Nim era tutt’altro che roseo. Terrace non muoveva un dito per salvarlo da quel destino, e così ci pensarono alcuni degli assistenti che avevano preso parte al progetto: organizzarono un battage mediatico denunciando le condizioni inumane in cui Nim era tenuto, diedero avvio a un’azione legale e infine riuscirono a farlo trasferire in un ranch di recupero per animali selvatici, liberando anche le altre scimmie destinate agli esperimenti.

Nonostante fosse al sicuro in questa riserva naturale, Nim era ormai provato, abbattuto e depresso; restava immobile e senza mangiare anche per giorni. Quando dopo anni la sua prima madre adottiva, Stephanie LaFarge, gli fece visita e volle entrare nella gabbia, Nim la riconobbe immediatamente e, come se la ritenesse responsabile per averlo abbandonato, la attaccò quando lei provò ad entrare nella gabbia.

Eppure arrivò per Nim almeno un’ultima, insperata, dolce sorpresa: dopo un lungo periodo di solitudine, un altro scimpanzé, femmina, venne introdotto nella sua gabbia e per la prima volta Nim riuscì a socializzare con la nuova arrivata.
Potè così passare gli ultimi anni della sua vita in compagnia di una nuova amica, forse più sincera e fidata di quanto non fossero stati gli uomini. Nim morì nel 2000 per un attacco di cuore.

Il professor Terrace, dopo aver cercato e ottenuto la fama grazie a questo ambizioso progetto, tornò sui suoi passi e dichiarò che il progetto era stato fallimentare; dichiarò che Nim non aveva mai veramente imparato a formulare delle frasi di senso compiuto, ma che era soltanto divenuto abile ad associare certi segni alla ricompensa, e aveva capito quali sequenze usare per ottenere del cibo. La voglia dei ricercatori di vedere in un animale un’intelligenza simile alla nostra aveva insomma viziato i risultati, che andavano grandemente ridimensionati.
Ancora oggi però c’è chi è convinto del contrario: gli assistenti e i collaboratori che hanno conosciuto Nim e si sono presi cura di lui continuano anche oggi a sostenere che Nim sapesse davvero parlare in maniera chiara e precisa, e che se Terrace si fosse degnato di stare un po’ di più con lo scimpanzé, invece di relazionarsi con lui soltanto al momento di farsi bello davanti ai fotografi, l’avrebbe certamente capito.

La ricerca, per la metodologia confusionaria con cui venne condotta, ha effettivamente un valore scientifico relativo, e i dati raccolti si prestano a interpretazioni troppo volubili.
D’altronde un esperimento come il progetto Nim è figlio del suo tempo, e sarebbe impensabile replicarlo oggi; lo strano destino di Nim, questo essere speciale che ha vissuto due vite in una, la prima come “umano” e la seconda come animale da laboratorio, continua però a sollevare altre questioni, forse ancora più fondamentali. Ci interroga sui confini (reali? inventati?) che separano l’uomo dalla bestia, e soprattutto sui limiti etici della ricerca.

Nel 2010 James Marsh (già regista di Man On Wire) ha diretto uno splendido documentario, Project Nim, costituito in larga parte di materiale d’archivio inedito, che ripercorre in maniera commovente e appassionante l’intera vicenda.

Emozioni vegetali

Pannocchia strappò i biglietti.
Zucchina e Broccolo entrarono nella sala e si sedettero sulle poltrone, emozionati.
Zucchina: – Ma fa davvero tanta paura, questo film?
Broccolo: – Dai, fifona, ci sono qua io!
E così dicendo, allungò ridendo un ciuffo di rametti sulla spalla di Zucchina.
Si spensero le luci, si udì una musica tenebrosa e il titolo apparve sullo schermo: LA NOTTE DEI VEGANI!

 

Di tanto in tanto i giornali pubblicano la notizia che nessun vegetariano vorrebbe mai sentire: alcuni scienziati avrebbero scoperto che anche le piante hanno un sistema nervoso, che pensano, soffrono ed hanno addirittura una memoria. Ma quanto c’è di vero in queste evidenti semplificazioni giornalistiche? Le piante sono realmente capaci di pensiero, di percezioni ed emozioni? Perfino di “ricordare” chi fa loro del bene e chi invece infligge del dolore?

Tutti abbiamo sentito dire che le piante crescono meglio se con loro si parla, se si lavano le loro foglie amorevolmente, se le si riempie di affetto. Alcuni esperti dal pollice verde giurano che facendo ascoltare la musica classica a una piantina da salotto crescerà più rigogliosa e i suoi colori si faranno più intensi. Quest’idea è in realtà nata a metà dell’Ottocento, ed è attribuita al pioniere della psicologia sperimentale Gustav Fechner, ma è stato lo scienziato indiano Chandra Bose che l’ha presa sul serio, tanto da sviluppare i primi test di laboratorio sull’argomento, agli inizi del Novecento.

Chandra Bose si convinse che le piante avessero un qualche tipo di sistema nervoso analizzando le modificazioni che avvenivano nella membrana delle cellule quando le sottoponeva a diverse condizioni: in particolare, secondo Bose, ogni pianta rispondeva a uno shock con uno “spasmo” simile a quello di un animale. Le cellule, osservò, avevano “vibrazioni” diverse a seconda che la pianta fosse coccolata o, viceversa, torturata. Pare che anche il celebre drammaturgo (vegetariano) George B. Shaw fosse rimasto sconvolto quando, in visita ai laboratori di Bose, vide un cavolo morire bollito fra atroci spasmi e convulsioni.

Ma Bose non si limitò a questo: scoprì che una musica rilassante aumentava la crescita delle piante, e una dissonante la rallentava; sperimentò con precisione l’effetto che veleni e droghe avevano sulle cellule. Infine, per dimostrare che tutto ha un’anima, o perlomeno una matrice comune, si mise ad avvelenare i metalli. Avete letto bene. Bose “somministrò” diverse quantità di veleno all’alluminio, allo zinco e al platino – ottenendo dei grafici straordinari che dimostravano che anche i metalli soffrivano di avvelenamento esattamente come ogni altro essere vivente.

Se vi sembra che Bose si sia spinto un po’ troppo in là con la fantasia, aspettate che entri in scena Cleve Backster.

Nel 1966, mentre faceva delle ricerche sulle modificazioni elettriche in una pianta che viene annaffiata, Backster collegò un poligrafo (macchina della verità) ad una delle foglie della piantina su cui stava lavorando. Con sua grande sorpresa, scoprì che il poligrafo registrava delle fluttuazioni nella resistenza elettrica del tutto simili a quelle di un uomo che viene sottoposto a un test della verità. Era possibile che la pianta stesse provando qualche tipo di stress? E se, per esempio, le avesse bruciato una foglia, cosa sarebbe successo? Proprio mentre pensava queste cose, l’ago del poligrafo impazzì, portandosi di colpo al massimo. Backster si convinse che la pianta doveva in qualche modo essersi accorta del suo progetto di bruciarle una foglia – gli aveva letto nella mente!

Da quel momento sia Backster che altri ricercatori (Horowitz, Lewis, Gasteiger) decisero di esplorare il mistero delle reazioni emotive delle piante. Attaccandole al poligrafo, registrarono i picchi e interpretarono le risposte che i vegetali davano a diverse situazioni. Gli strumenti regalavano continue sorprese: le piante “urlavano” orripilate quando i ricercatori bollivano davanti a loro dei gamberetti vivi, si calmavano quando gli scienziati mettevano sul giradischi i Notturni di Chopin, si “ubriacavano” addirittura se venivano annaffiate col vino. Non solo, mostravano di riconoscere ogni ricercatore, dando un segnale diverso e preciso ogni volta che uno di loro entrava nella stanza; “prevedevano” quello che lo scienziato stava per fare, tanto che per spaventarle gli bastava pensare di spezzare un rametto o staccare una foglia.

Il libro che dettagliava tutti i risultati di queste ricerche,  La vita segreta delle piante di Tompkins e Bird, fu pubblicato nel 1973 e divenne immediatamente un caso sensazionale. Venne addirittura adattato per il cinema, e il film omonimo (musicato da Stevie Wonder) suscitò infinite controversie.

Tutti questi scienziati interessati alle misteriose qualità paranormali delle piante avevano però una cosa in comune: mostravano un po’ troppa voglia di dimostrare le loro tesi. Successive ripetizioni di questi esperimenti, condotti da ricercatori un po’ più scettici in laboratori più “seri”, come potete immaginare, non diedero alcun risultato. Ma allora, dove sta la verità? Le piante possono o non possono pensare, ricordare, provare emozioni?

Cominciamo con lo sfatare uno dei miti più resistenti nel tempo: le piante non hanno un sistema nervoso. Come tutte le cellule viventi, anche le cellule vegetali funzionano grazie allo scambio di elettricità, ma questo passaggio di energia non si sviluppa lungo canali dedicati e preferenziali come accade con i nostri nervi. Talvolta le piante rispondono alla luce con una “cascata” di impulsi elettrici che durano anche quando la luce è terminata, e questo ha portato alcuni giornalisti a parlare di una “memoria” dell’evento; ma la metafora è sbagliata, sarebbe come dire che i cerchi sulla superficie dell’acqua continuano anche dopo che il sasso è andato a fondo perché l’acqua è capace di ricordare.

[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Zq3UuHlPLQU]

[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LXb6YKERKn4]

Se il ruolo dei segnali elettrici nelle piante è ancora in larga parte sconosciuto, questo non ci autorizza ad attribuire categorie umane ai loro comportamenti. Certo, alle volte è difficile ammirare le meraviglie del mondo vegetale senza immaginare che nascondano un qualche tipo di coscienza, o di “mente”. Pensate al geotropismo e al fototropismo: non importa come girate una pianta, le radici si dirigeranno sempre verso il basso e i rami verso l’alto, con puntuale precisione e a seconda della specie di pianta. Pensate all’edera che si arrampica per decine di metri, alle piante carnivore che scattano più veloci degli insetti, ai girasoli che seguono il nostro astro in cielo, alle piante che fioriscono soltanto quando i giorni cominciano ad allungarsi e quelle che invece fioriscono non appena le giornate si accorciano. Esiste perfino un certo tipo di “comunicazione” fra le piante: se un parassita attacca un pino in una foresta, la risposta immunitaria viene riscontrata contemporaneamente in tutto il bosco, e non soltanto nell’albero che è stato attaccato – la “notizia” dell’arrivo del nemico è stata in qualche modo segnalata al resto degli alberi. Prima di precipitarci a concludere che esiste un linguaggio delle piante, però, faremmo meglio a tenere i piedi a terra.

Le piante, come la maggior parte degli organismi, percepiscono il mondo attorno a loro, processano le informazioni che raccolgono e rispondono agli stimoli esterni alterando la propria crescita e il proprio sviluppo, e mettendo in atto tecniche e strategie di sopravvivenza a volte sorprendentemente sofisticate. Ancora oggi alcuni di questi processi rimangono effettivamente misteriosi. Ma Elizabeth Van Volkenburgh, botanica dell’Università di Washington, chiarisce una volta per tutte: “un grosso errore che fa la gente è parlare delle piante come se ‘sapessero’ cosa stanno facendo. Insegnanti di biologia, ricercatori, studenti e gente comune fanno tutti lo stesso sbaglio. Io preferirei dire che una pianta avverte e risponde, piuttosto che dire che ‘sa’. Usare parole come ‘intelligenza’ o ‘pensiero’ per le piante è un errore. Alle volte è divertente, un po’ provocatorio. Ma è scorretto.”

Quando parliamo di piante che riflettono, decidono, amano o soffrono, staremmo quindi commettendo l’errore di proiettare caratteristiche prettamente umane sui vegetali. Bisognerebbe forse pensare alle piante come a una specie aliena, con cui non è possibile adottare metri di misura umani: parlare di emozioni, ricordi, pensiero è illudersi che le nostre specifiche caratteristiche vadano bene per tutti gli esseri viventi, è voler vedere noi stessi in ciò che è diverso. Così, domandarsi se una pianta prova dolore è forse un quesito senza senso.

Per concludere, è buona norma prendere sempre con le pinze le divulgazioni spacciate per “clamorose scoperte”. Allo stesso tempo, se la prossima volta che affettate un pomodoro, cogliete una margherita o addentate una mela avrete un attimo di esitazione, o un leggero brivido… beh, qui a Bizzarro Bazar potremo ritenerci soddisfatti.

Ecco un articolo (in inglese) sul sito del Scientific American.