The Carney Landis Experiment

Suppose you’re making your way through a jungle, and in pulling aside a bush you find yourself before a huge snake, ready to attack you. All of a sudden adrenaline rushes through your body, your eyes open wide, and you instantly begin to sweat as your heartbeat skyrockets: in a word, you feel afraid.
But is your fear triggering all these physical reactions, or is it the other way around?
To make a less disquieting example, let’s say you fall in love at first sight with someone. Are the endorphines to be accounted for your excitation, or is your excitation causing their discharge through your body?
What comes first, physiological change or emotion? Which is the cause and which is the effect?

This dilemma was a main concern in the first studies on emotion (and it still is, in the field of affective neurosciences). Among the first and most influential hypothesis was the James-Lange theory, which maintained the primacy of physiological changes over feelings: the brain detects a modification in the stimuli coming from the nervous system, and it “interprets” them by giving birth to an emotion.

One of the problems with this theory was the impossibility of obtaining clear evidence. The skeptics argued that if every emotion arises mechanically within the body, then there should be a gland or an organ which, when conveniently stimulated, will invariably trigger the same emotion in every person. Today we know a little bit more of how emotions work, in regard to the amygdala and the different areas of cerebral cortex, but at the beginning of the Twentieth Century the objection against the James-Lange theory was basically this — “come on, find me the muscle of sadness!

In 1924, Carney Landis, a Minnesota University graduate student, set out to understand experimentally whether these physiological changes are the same for everybody. He focused on those modifications that are the most evident and easy to study: the movement of facial muscles when emotion arises. His study was meant to find repetitive patterns in facial expressions.

To understand if all subjects reacted in the same way to emotions, Landis recruited a good number of his fellow graduate students, and began by painting their faces with standard marks, in order to highlight their grimaces and the related movement of facial muscles.
The experiment consisted in subjecting them to different stimuli, while taking pictures of their faces.

At first volunteers were asked to complete some rather harmless tasks: they had to listen to jazz music, smell ammonia, read a passage from the Bible, tell a lie. But the results were quite discouraging, so Landis decided it was time to raise the stakes.

He began to show his subjects pornographic images. Then some medical photos of people with horrendous skin conditions. Then he tried firing a gunshot to capture on film the exact moment of their fright. Still, Landis was having a hard time getting the expressions he wanted, and in all probability he began to feel frustrated. And here his experiment took a dark turn.

He invited his subjects to stick their hand in a bucket, without looking. The bucket was full of live frogs. Click, went his camera.
Landis encouraged them to search around the bottom of the mysterious bucket. Overcoming their revulsion, the unfortunate volunteers had to rummage through the slimy frogs until they found the real surprise: electrical wires, ready to deliver a good shock. Click. Click.
But the worst was yet to come.

The experiment reached its climax when Landis put a live mouse in the subject’s left hand, and a knife in the other. He flatly ordered to decapitate the mouse.
Most of his incredulous and stunned subjects asked Landis if he was joking. He wasn’t, they actually had to cut off the little animal’s head, or he himself would do it in front of their eyes.
At this point, as Landis had hoped, the reactions really became obvious — but unfortunately they also turned out to be more complex than he expected. Confronted with this high-stress situation, some persons started crying, others hysterically laughed; some completely froze, others burst out into swearing.

Two thirds of the paricipants ended up complying with the researcher’s order, and carried out the macabre execution. In any case, the remaining third had to witness the beheading, performed by Landis himself.
As we said, the subjects were mainly other students, but one notable exception was a 13 years-old boy who happened to be at the department as a patient, on the account of psychological issues and high blood pressure. His reaction was documented by Landis’ ruthless snapshots.

Perhaps the most embarassing aspect of the whole story was that the final results for this cruel test — which no ethical board would today authorize — were not even particularly noteworthy.
Landis, in his Studies of Emotional Reactions, II., General Behavior and Facial Expression (published on the Journal of Comparative Psychology, 4 [5], 447-509) came to these conclusions:

1) there is no typical facial expression accompanying any emotion aroused in the experiment;
2) emotions are not characterized by a typical expression or recurring pattern of muscular behavior;
3) smiling was the most common reaction, even during unpleasant experiences;
4) asymmetrical bodily reactions almost never occurred;
5) men were more expressive than women.

Hardly anything that could justify a mouse massacre, and the trauma inflicted upon the paritcipants.

After obtaining his degree, Carney Landis devoted himself to sexual psychopatology. He went on to have a brillant carreer at the New York State Psychiatric Institute. And he never harmed a rodent again, despite the fact that he is now mostly remembered for this ill-considered juvenile experiment rather than for his subsequent fourty years of honorable research.

There is, however, one last detail worth mentioning.
Alex Boese in his Elephants On Acid, underlines how the most interesting figure of all this bizarre experiment went unnoticed: the fact that two thirds of the subjects, although protesting and suffering, obeyed the terrible order.
And this percentage is in fact similar to the one recorded during the infamous Milgram experiment, in which a scientist commanded the subjects to inflict an electric shock to a third individual (in reality, an actor who pretended to receive the painful discharge). In that case as well, despite the ethical conflict, the simple fact that the order came from an authority figure was enough to push the subjects into carrying out an action they perceived as aberrant.

The Milgram experiment took place in 1961, almost forty years after the Landis experiment. “It is often this way with experiments — says Boese — A scientis sets out to prove one thing, but stumbles upon something completely different, something far more intriguing. For this reason, good researchers know they should always pay close attention to strange events that occur during their experiments. A great discovery might be lurking right beneath their eyes – or beneath te blade of their knife.

On facial expressions related to emotions, see also my former post on Guillaume Duchenne (sorry, Italian language only).

The Abominable Vice

Among the bibliographic curiosities I have been collecting for years, there is also a little book entitled L’amico discreto. It’s the 1862 Italian translation of The silent friend (1847) by R. e L. Perry; aside from 100 beautiful anatomical plates, the book also shows a priceless subtitle: Observations on Onanism and Its Baneful Results, Including Mental and Sexual Incapacity and Impotence.

Just by skimming through the table of contents, it’s clear how masturbation was indicated as the main cause for a wide array of conditions: from indigestion to “hypoconriac melancholy”, from deafness to “bending of the penis”, from emaciated complexion to the inability to walk, in a climax of ever more terrible symptoms preparing the way for the ultimate, inevitable outcome — death.
One page after the other, the reader learns why onanism is to be blamed for such illnesses, specifically because it provokes an

excitement of the nervous system [which] by stimulating the organs to transient vigour, brings, ere middle life succeeds the summer of manhood, all the sensible infirmities and foibles of age; producing in its impetuous current, such an assemblage of morbid irritation, that even on trivial occasions its excitement is of a high and inflammable character, and its endurance beyond the power of reason to sustain.

But this is just the beginning: the worst damage is on the mind and soul, because this state of constant nervous stimulation

places the individual in a state of anxiety and misery for the remainder of his existence, — a kind of contingency, which it is difficult for language adequately to describe; he vegetates, but lives not: […] leading the excited deviating mind into a fertile field of seductive error — into a gradual and fatal degradation of manhood — into a pernicious, disgraceful, and ultimately almost involuntary application of those inherent rights which nature wisely instituted for the preservation of her species […] in defiance of culture, moral feeling, moral obligation, and religious impressions: thus the man, who, at the advent of youth and genius was endowed with gaiety and sociality, becomes, ere twenty-five summers have shed their lustre on him, a misanthrope, and a nadir-point of discontent! What moral region does that man live in? […] Is it nothing to light the gloomy torch that guides, by slow and melancholy steps to the sepulchre of manhood, in the gay and fascinating spring-time of youth and ardent desire; when the brilliant fire of passion, genius, and sentiment, ought to electrify the whole frame?

This being a physiology and anatomy essay, today its embellishments, its evocative language (closer to second-rate poetry than to science) seem oddly out of place — and we can smile upon reading its absurd theories; yet The Silent Friend is just one of many Nineteeth Century texts demonizing masturbation, all pretty popular since 1712, when an anonymous priest published a volume called Onania, followed in 1760 by L’Onanisme by Swiss doctor Samuel-Auguste Tissot, which had rapidly become a best-seller of its time.
Now, if physicians reacted in such a harsh way against male masturbation, you can guess their stance on female auto-eroticism.

Here, the repulsion for an act which was already considered aberrant, was joined by all those ancestral fears regarding female sexuality. From the ancient vagina dentata (here is an old post about it) to Plato’s description of the uterus (hystera) as an aggressive animale roaming through the woman’s abdomen, going through theological precepts in Biblical-Christian tradition, medicine inherited a somber, essentially misogynistic vision: female sexuality, a true repressed collective unconscious, was perceived as dangerous and ungovernable.
Another text in my library is the female analogue of Tissot’s Onania: written by J.D.T. de Bienville, La Ninfomania ovvero il Furore Uterino (“Nymphomania, or The Uterine Fury”) was originally published in France in 1771.
I’m pasting here a couple of passages, which show a very similar style in respect to the previous quotes:

We see some perverted young girls, who have conducted a voluptuous life over a long period of time, suddenly fall prey to this disease; and this happens when forced retirement is keeping them from those occasions which facilitated their guilty and fatal inclination. […] All of them, after they are conquered by such malady, occupy themselves with the same force and energy with those objects which light in their passion the infernal flame of lewd pleasure […], they indulge in reading lewd Novels, that begin by bending their heart to soft feelings, and end up inspiring the most depraved and gross incontinence. […] Those women who, after taking a few steps in this horrible labyrinth, miss the strength to come back, are drawn almost imperceptibly to excesses, which after corrupting and damaging their good name, deprive them of their own life.

The book goes on to describe the hallucinatory state in which the nymphomaniacs fall, frantically hurling at men (by nature all chaste and pure, it seems), and barely leaving them “the time to escape their hands“.
Of course, this an Eighteenth Century text. But things did not improve in the following century: during the Nineteenth Century, actually, the ill-concealed desire to repress female sexuality found one of its cruelest incarnations, the so-called “extirpation”.

This euphemism was used to indicate the practice of clitoridectomy, the surgical removal of the clitoris.
Everybody kows that female genital mutilations continue to be a reality in many countries, and they have been the focus of several international campaigns to abandon the practice.
It seems hard to believe that, far from being solely a tribal tradition, it became widespread in Europe and in the United States within the frame of modern Western medicine.
Clitoridectomy, a simple yet brutal operation, was based on the idea that female masturbation led to hysteria, lesbianism and nymphomania. The perfect circular reasoning behind this theory was the following: in mental institutions, insane female patients were often caught masturbating, therefore masturbation had to be the cause of their lunacy.

One of the most fervent promoters of extirpation was Dr. Isaac Baker Brown, English gynaecologist and obstetrical surgeon.
In 1858 he opened a clinic on Notting Hill, ad his therapies became so successful that Baker Brown resigned from Guy’s Hospital to work privately full time. By means of clitoridectomy, he was able to cure (if we are to trust his own words) several kinds of madness, epilepsy, catalepsy and hysteria in his patients: in 1866 he published a nice little book on the subject, which was praised by the Times because Brown “brought insanity within the scope of surgical treatment“. In his book, Brown reported 48 cases of female masturbation, the heinous effects on the patients’ health, and the miraculous result of clitoridectomy in curing the symptoms.

We don’t know for sure how many women ended up under the enthusiastic doctor’s knife.
Brown would have probably carried on with his mutilation work, if he hadn’t made the mistake of setting up a publicity campaign to advertise his clinic. Even then, self-promotion was considered ethically wrong for a physician, so on April 29, 1866, the British Medical Journal published a heavy j’accuse against the doctor. The Lancet followed shortly after, then even the Times proved to have changed position and asked if the surgical treatment of illness was legal at all. Brown ended up being investigated by the Lunacy Commission, which dealt with the patients’ welfare in asylums, and in panic he denied he ever carried out clitoridectomies on his mentally ill patients.

But it was too late.
Even the Royal College of Surgeons turned away from him, and a meeting decided (with 194 approving votes against 38 opposite votes) his removal from the Obstetric Society of London.
R. Youngson and I. Schott, in A Brief History of Bad Medicine (Robinson, 2012), highlight the paradox of this story:

The extraordinary thing was that Baker Brown was disgraced, not because he practised clitoridectomy for ridiculuous indications, but because, out of greed, he had offended against professional ethics. No one ever suggested that there was anything wrong with clitoridectomy, as such. Many years were to pass before this operation was condemned by the medical profession.

And many more, until eventually masturbation could be freed from medical criminalization and moral prejudice: at the beginning of the Twentieth Century doctors still recommended the use of constrictive laces and gears, straight-jackets, up to shock treatments like cauterization or electroconvulsive therapy.

1903 patent to prevent erections and nocturnal pollutions through the use of spikes, electric shocks and an alarm bell.

Within this dreadful galaxy of old anti-masturbation devices, there’s one looking quite harmless and even healthy: corn flakes, which were invented by famous Dr. Kellogg as an adjuvant diet against the temptations of onanism. And yet, whenever cereals didn’t do the trick, Kellogg advised that young boys’ foreskins should be sewn with wire; as for young girls, he recommended burning the clitoris with phenol, which he considered

an excellent means of allaying the abnormal excitement, and preventing the recurrence of the practice in those whose will-power has become so weakened that the patient is unable to exercise entire self-control.
The worse cases among young women are those in which the disease has advanced so far that erotic thoughts are attended by the same voluptuous sensations that accompany the practice. The author has met many cases of this sort in young women, who acknowledged that the sexual orgasm was thus produced, often several times daily. The application of carbolic acid in the manner described is also useful in these cases in allaying the abnormal excitement, which is a frequent provocation of the practice of this form of mental masturbation.

(J. H. Kellogg, Plain Facts for Old And Young, 1888)

It was not until the Kinsey Reports (1948-1953) that masturbation was eventually legitimized as a natural and healthy part of sexuality.
All in all, as Woody Allen put it, it’s just “sex with someone you love“.

On the “fantastic physiology” of the uterus, there is a splendid article (in Italian language) here. Wikipedia has also a page on the history of masturbation. I also recommend Orgasm and the West. A History of Pleasure from the Sixteenth Century to the Present, by R. Muchembled.

Freaks: Gaze and Disability

Introduction: those damn colored glasses

The image below is probably my favorite illusion (in fact I wrote about it before).

At a first glance it looks like a family in a room, having breakfast.
Yet when the picture is shown to the people living in some rural parts of Africa, they see something different: a family having breakfast in the open, under a tree, while the mother balances a box on her head, maybe to amuse her children. This is not an optical illusion, it’s a cultural one.

The origins of this picture are not certain, but it is not relevant here whether it has actually been used in a psychological study, nor if it shows a prejudice on life in the Third World. The force of this illustration is to underline how culture is an inevitable filter of reality.

It reminds of a scene in Werner Herzog’s documentary film The Flying Doctors of East Africa (1969), in which the doctors find it hard to explain to the population that flies carry infections; showing big pictures of the insects and the descriptions of its dangers does not have much effect because people, who are not used to the conventions of our graphic representations, do not understand they are in scale, and think: “Sure, we will watch out, but around here flies are never THAT big“.

Even if we would not admit it, our vision is socially conditioned. Culture is like a pair of glasses with colored lenses, quite useful in many occasions to decipher the world but deleterious in many others, and it’s hard to get rid of these glasses by mere willpower.

‘Freak pride’ and disability

Let’s address the issue of “freaks”: originally a derogatory term, the word has now gained a peculiar cultural charm and ,as such, I always used it with the purpose of fighting pietism and giving diversity it its just value.
Any time I set out to talk about human marvels, I experienced first-hand how difficult it is to write about these people.

Reflecting on the most correct angle to address the topic means to try and take off culture’s colored glasses, an almost impossible task. I often wondered if I myself have sometimes succumbed to unintended generalizations, if I unwillingly fell into a self-righteous approach.
Sure enough, I have tried to tell these amazing characters’ stories through the filter of wonder: I believed that – equality being a given – the separation between the ordinary and the extra-ordinary could be turned in favor of disability.
I have always liked those “deviants” who decided to take back their exotic bodies, their distance from the Norm, in some sort of freak pride that would turn the concept of handicap inside out.

But is it really the most correct approach to diversity and, in some cases, disability? To what extent is this vision original, or is it just derivative from a long cultural tradition? What if the freak, despite all pride, actually just wanted an ordinary dimension, what if what he was looking for was the comfort of an average life? What is the most ethical narrative?

This doubt, I think, arose from a paragraph by Fredi Saal, born in 1935, a German author who spent the first part of his existence between hospitals and care homes because he was deemed “uneducable”:

No, it is not the disabled person who experiences him- or herself as abnormal — she or he is experienced as abnormal by others, because a whole section of human life is cut off. Thus this very existence acquires a threatening quality. One doesn’t start from the disabled persons themselves, but from one’s own experience. One asks oneself, how would I react, should a disability suddenly strike, and the answer is projected onto the disabled person. Thus one receives a completely distorted image. Because it is not the other fellow that one sees, but oneself.

(F. Saal, Behinderung = Selbstgelebte Normalität, 1992)

As much as the idea of a freak pride is dear to me, it may well be another subconscious projection: I may just like to think that I would react to disability that way… and yet one more time I am not addressing the different person, but rather my own romantic and unrealistic idea of diversity.

We cannot obviously look through the eyes of a disabled person, there is an insuperable barrier, but it is the same that ultimately separates all human beings. The “what would I do in that situation?” Saal talks about, the act of projecting ourselves onto others, that is something we endlessly do and not just with the disabled.

The figure of the freak has always been ambiguous – or, better, what is hard to understand is our own gaze on the freak.
I think it is therefore important to trace the origins of this gaze, to understand how it evolved: we could even discover that this thing we call disability is actually nothing more than another cultural product, an illusion we are “trained” to recognize in much the same way we see the family having breakfast inside a living room rather than out in the open.

In my defense, I will say this: if it is possible for me to imagine a freak pride, it is because the very concept of freak does not come out of the blue, and does not even entail disability. Many people working in freakshows were also disabled, others were not. That was not the point. The real characteristics that brought those people on stage was the sense of wonder they could evoke: some bodies were admired, others caused scandal (as they were seen as unbearably obscene), but the public bought the ticket to be shocked, amazed and shaken in their own certainties.

In ancient times, the monstrum was a divine sign (it shares its etymological root with the Italian verb mostrare, “to show”), which had to be interpreted – and very often feared, as a warning of doom. If the monstruous sign was usually seen as bearer of misfortune, some disabilities were not (for instance blindness and lunacy, which were considered forms of clairvoyance, see V. Amendolagine, Da castigo degli dei a diversamente abili: l’identità sociale del disabile nel corso del tempo, 2014).

During the Middle Ages the problem of deformity becomes much more complex: on one hand physiognomy suggested a correlation between ugliness and a corrupted soul, and literature shows many examples of enemies being libeled through the description of their physical defects; on the other, theologians and philosophers (Saint Augustine above all) considered deformity as just another example of Man’s penal condition on this earth, so much so that in the Resurrection all signs of it would be erased (J.Ziegler in Deformità fisica e identità della persona tra medioevo ed età moderna, 2015); some Christian female saints even went to the extreme of invoking deformity as a penance (see my Ecstatic Bodies: Hagiography and Eroticism).
Being deformed also precluded the access to priesthood (ordo clericalis) on the basis of a famous passage from the  Leviticus, in which offering sacrifice on the altar is forbidden to those who have imperfect bodies (P. Ostinelli, Deformità fisica…, 2015).

The monstrum becoming mirabile, worthy of admiration, is a more modern idea, but that was around well before traveling circuses, before Tod Browning’s “One of us!“, and before hippie counterculture seized it: this concept is opposed to the other great modern invention in regard to disability, which is commiseration.
The whole history of our relationship with disability fluctuates between these two poles: admiration and pity.

The right kind of eyes

In the German exhibition Der (im)perfekte Mensch (“The (im)perfect Human Being”), held in 2001 in the Deutsches Hygiene Museum in Dresden, the social gaze at people with disabilities was divided into six main categories:

– The astonished and medical gaze
– The annihilating gaze
– The pitying gaze
– The admiring gaze
– The instrumentalizing gaze
– The excluding gaze

While this list can certainly be discussed, it has the merit of tracing some possible distinctions.
Among all the kinds of gaze listed here, the most bothering might be the pitying gaze. Because it implies the observer’s superiority, and a definitive judgment on a condition which, to the eyes of the “normal” person, cannot seem but tragic: it expresses a self-righteous, intimate certainty that the other is a poor cripple who is to be pitied. The underlying thought is that there can be no luck, no happiness in being different.

The concept of poor cripple, which (although hidden behind more politically correct words) is at the core of all fund-raising marathons, is still deeply rooted in our culture, and conveys a distorted vision of charity – often more focused on our own “pious deed” than on people with disabilities.

As for the pitying gaze, the most ancient historical example we know of is this 1620 print, kept at the Tiroler Landesmuseum Ferdinandeum in Innsbruck, which shows a disabled carpenter called  Wolffgang Gschaiter lying in his bed. The text explains how this man, after suffering unbearable pain to his left arm and back for three days, found himself completely paralyzed. For fifteen years, the print tells us, he was only able to move his eyes and tongue. The purpose of this paper is to collect donations and charity money, and the readers are invited to pray for him in the nearby church of the Three Saints in Dreiheiligen.

This pamphlet is interesting for several reasons: in the text, disability is explicitly described as a “mirror” of the observer’s own misery, therefore establishing the idea that one must think of himself as he is watching it; a distinction is made between body and soul to reinforce drama (the carpenter’s soul can be saved, his body cannot); the expression “poor cripple” is recorded for the first time.
But most of all this little piece of paper is one of the very first examples of mass communication in which disability is associated with the idea of donations, of fund raising. Basically what we see here is a proto-telethon, focusing on charity and church prayers to cleanse public conscience, and at the same time an instrument in line with the Counter-Reformation ideological propaganda (see V. Schönwiese, The Social Gaze at People with Disabilities, 2007).

During the previous century, another kind of gaze already developed: the clinical-anatomical gaze. This 1538 engraving by Albrecht Dürer shows a woman lying on a table, while an artist meticulously draws the contour of her body. Between the two figures stands a framework, on which some stretched-out strings divide the painter’s vision in small squares so that he can accurately transpose it on a piece of paper equipped with the same grid. Each curve, each detail is broke down and replicated thanks to this device: vision becomes the leading sense, and is organized in an aseptic, geometric, purely formal frame. This was the phase in which a real cartography of the human body was developed, and in this context deformity was studied in much the same manner. This is the “astonished and medical gaze“, which shows no sign of ethical or pitying judgment, but whose ideology is actually one of mapping, dividing, categorizing and ultimately dominating every possible variable of the cosmos.

In the wunderkammer of Ferdinand II, Archduke of Austria (1529-1595), inside Ambras Castle near Innsbruck, there is a truly exceptional portrait. A portion of the painting was originally covered by a red paper curtain: those visiting the collection in the Sixteenth Century might have seen something close to this reconstruction.

Those willing and brave enough could pull the paper aside to admire the whole picture: thus the subject’s limp and deformed body appeared, portrayed in raw detail and with coarse realism.

What Fifteen-Century observers saw in this painting, we cannot know for sure. To understand how views are relative, it suffices to remind that at the time “human marvels” included for instance foreigners from exotic countries, and a sub-category of foreigners were cretins who were said to inhabit certain geographic regions.
In books like Giovan Battista de’ Cavalieri’s Opera ne la quale vi è molti Mostri de tute le parti del mondo antichi et moderni (1585), people with disabilities can be found alongside monstruous apparitions, legless persons are depicted next to mythological Chimeras, etc.

But the red paper curtain in the Ambras portrait is an important signal, because it means that such a body was on one hand considered obscene, capable of upsetting the spectator’s senibility. On the other hand, the bravest or most curious onlookers could face the whole image. This leads us to believe that monstrosity in the Sixteenth Century had at least partially been released from the idea of prodigy, and freed from the previous centuries superstitions.

This painting is therefore a perfect example of “astonished and medical” gaze; from deformity as mirabilia to proper admiration, it’s a short step.

The Middle Path?

The admiring gaze is the one I have often opted for in my articles. My writing and thinking practice coincides with John Waters’ approach, when he claims he feels some kind of admiration for the weird characters in his movies: “All the characters in my movies, I look up to them. I don’t think about them the way people think about reality TV – that we are better and you should laugh at them.

And yet, here we run the risk of falling into the opposite trap, an excessive idealization. It may well be because of my peculiar allergy to the concept of “heroes”, but I am not interested in giving hagiographic versions of the life of human marvels.

All these thoughts which I have shared with you, lead me to believe there is no easy balance. One cannot talk about freaks without running into some kind of mistake, some generalization, without falling victim to the deception of colored glasses.
Every communication between us and those with different/disabled bodies happens in a sort of limbo, where our gaze meets theirs. And in this space, there cannot ever be a really authentic confrontation, because from a physical perspective we are separated by experiences too far apart.
I will never be able to understand other people’s body, and neither will they.

But maybe this distance is exactly what draws us together.

“Everyone stands alone at the heart of the world…”

Let’s consider the only reference we have – our own body – and try to break the habit.
I will borrow the opening words from the introduction I wrote for Nueva Carne by Claudio Romo:

Our bodies are unknowable territories.
We can dismantle them, cut them up into ever smaller parts, study their obsessive geometries, meticulously map every anatomical detail, rummage in their entrails… and their secret will continue to escape us.
We stare at our hands. We explore our teeth with our tongues. We touch our hair.
Is
this what we are?

Here is the ultimate mind exercise, my personal solution to the freaks’ riddle: the only sincere and honest way I can find to relate diversity is to make it universal.

Johnny Eck woke up in this world without the lower limbs; his brother, on the contrary, emerged from the confusion of shapes with two legs.
I too am equipped with feet, including toes I can observe, down there, as they move whenever I want them to. Are those toes still me? I ignore the reach of my own identity, and if there is an exact point where its extension begins.
On closer view, my experience and Johnny’s are different yet equally mysterious.
We are all brothers in the enigma of the flesh.

I would like to ideally sit with him  — with the freak, with the “monster” — out on the porch of memories, before the sunset of our lives.
‘So, what did you think of this strange trip? Of this strange place we wound up in?’, I would ask him.
And I am sure that his smile would be like mine.

Shen Dzu: i Maiali di Dio

15184779-ff1e-4231-b302-6ccc4791293e_640#640

Ogni anno all’incirca a metà di luglio del calendario cinese, a Taipei sull’isola di Taiwan, si svolge il Festival Yimin. Si tratta di una ricorrenza religiosa in cui si commemorano i duecento guerrieri di etnia hakka che persero la vita, verso la fine del ‘700, durante una ribellione: parate festose, colorate, con musica e danze.
Si tratta anche di un evento che da qualche anno è vivacemente contestato da alcuni gruppi di animalisti taiwanesi, che stanno cercando di sensibilizzare anche il resto del mondo sulla crudeltà di una particolare gara che si compie all’interno del festival: lo Shen Dzu Contest, ovvero la competizione dei Maiali di Dio.

I Maiali di Dio, protagonisti di questa gara, sono dei suini che fra i 15 e i 24 mesi di età hanno avuto la sfortuna di essere selezionati per diventare vittime sacrificali. Per prima cosa vengono castrati, senza anestesia, nella convinzione che questo aumenti la robustezza della loro costituzione. Dopodiché, per un periodo che può durare anche un paio d’anni, sono confinati in spazi angusti affinché non possano muoversi, e nutriti a forza con un tubo di gomma infilato direttamente nell’esofago. La tecnica del gavage, ritenuta non etica e quindi vietata in Italia, è tuttora utilizzata in Francia, Spagna, Stati Uniti, Bulgaria, Ungheria e Belgio per la produzione di foie gras. Nel caso degli Shen Dzu, però, il risultato è ancora più impressionante: i maiali vengono alimentati di continuo fino ad assumere una mole spaventosa, arrivando a pesare quasi una tonnellata – mentre gli esemplari domestici normalmente non superano i 2-300 kg. Incapaci di camminare o anche soltanto di reggersi sulle gambe, spesso con organi interni completamente deformati, la pelle piagata dal forzato decubito, i colossali animali devono essere portati in piazza a forza di braccia, anche da una ventina di persone ciascuno.
Si dice che, per barare ed aumentare il peso del maiale, alcuni allevatori con pochi scrupoli somministrino agli animali, nei giorni precedenti alla gara, dei cibi “speciali”: al posto del solito riso, della frutta o delle patate, questi ultimi pasti sono a base di sabbia, piombo, o qualsiasi materiale pesante.

maiali-cinesi_O4

20060809204738

Una volta sul palco della competizione, il maiale più grasso otterrà la vittoria. Ma questo non gli risparmierà di finire, come tutti gli altri concorrenti, sgozzato e macellato di fronte alla folla festante, in sacrificio ai 200 valorosi martiri Yimin.

A worshipper prepares to insert a knife into the throat of a fattened pig for a sacrifice as part of the Hakka Yimin Festival in Hsinchu

P02-110811-a2

Lo Shen Dzu Contest è anche un business, poiché la carne viene venduta al miglior offerente. Una vittima sacrificale di 600 kg può fruttare, in media, circa 4.500 €, mentre un esemplare di 900 kg arriva anche al costo di 67.500 €.

Una volta macellati i Maiali di Dio, la loro pelle viene stesa, dipinta con motivi tradizionali, e montata su grandi carri da parata per essere ammirati dalla folla.

0023ae606e660de4649c0e

0023ae606e660de4649d10

0023ae606e660de4649d0f

6076242763_61f169e7f9_z

6076204199_f35cf75309_b

Come ultima nota ironica, va notato che nutrire a forza gli animali, e macellarli in pubblico, è ufficialmente vietato dalla legge taiwanese; ma, secondo le associazioni animaliste, il governo non farebbe nulla per impedire lo svolgersi dello Shen Dzu Contest, per paura di rappresaglie da parte dei numerosi gruppi religiosi che lo rivendicano come parte della loro tradizione culturale.

9594727123_a5c955a6ff_z

Worshippers look at fattened sacrificial pigs as part of the Hakka Yimin Festival in Hsinchu

pigs-of-god-festival7

pigs-of-god-festival8

pigs-of-god-festival2-550x418

pigs-of-god-festival-550x363

pigs-of-god-festival6-550x356

pigs-of-god-festival10

Ecco il sito ufficiale del festival Yimin, contente molte informazioni sulla cultura hakka.

(Grazie, Fabio!)

Tassidermia e vegetarianismo

SideTour_Taxidermy

La tassidermia sembra conoscere, in questi ultimi anni, una sorta di nuova vita. Alimentata dall’interesse per l’epoca vittoriana e dal diffondersi dell’iconografia e l’estetica della sottocultura goth, l’antica arte tassidermica sta velocemente diventando addirittura una moda: innumerevoli sono gli artisti che hanno cominciato ad integrare parti autentiche di animali nei loro gioielli e accessori, come vi confermerà un giro su Etsy, la più grande piattaforma di e-commerce per prodotti artigianali.

taxidermy kitten mouse necklace-f50586

tumblr_lovkxjtwur1qbkjd0o1_400

il_570xN.311750603

il_570xN.530781784_rwry
A Londra e a New York conoscono un crescente successo i workshop che insegnano, nel giro di una giornata o due, i rudimenti del mestiere. Un tassidermista esperto guida i partecipanti passo passo nella preparazione del loro primo esemplare, normalmente un topolino acquistato in un negozio di animali e destinato all’alimentazione dei rettili; molti alunni portano addirittura con sé dei minuscoli abiti, per vestire il proprio topolino alla maniera di Walter Potter.

article-2107482-11F22C86000005DC-726_634x460
Su Bizzarro Bazar abbiamo regolarmente parlato di tassidermia, e sappiamo per esperienza che l’argomento è sensibile: alcuni dei nostri articoli (rimbalzati senza controllo da un social all’altro) hanno scatenato le ire di animalisti e vegetariani, dando vita ad appassionati flame. Ci sembra quindi particolarmente interessante un articolo apparso da poco sull’Huffington Post a cura di Margot Magpie, sui rapporti fra tassidermia e vegetarianesimo.

Margot Magpie è istruttrice tassidermica proprio a Londra, e sostiene che una gran parte dei suoi alunni sia costituita da vegetariani o vegani. Ma come si concilia questa scelta di rispetto per gli animali con l’arte di impagliarli?

article-2107482-11F22FDE000005DC-919_634x408

article-2107482-11F22D3C000005DC-29_634x460

article-2107482-11F22EC7000005DC-410_634x523
Ovviamente, tagliare e preparare il corpo di un animale non implica certo mangiarne la carne. E una gran parte degli artisti, vegetariani e non, che operano oggi nel settore ci tengono a precisare che i loro esemplari non vengono uccisi con lo scopo di creare l’opera tassidermica, ma sono già morti di cause naturali oppure – come nel caso dei topolini – allevati per un motivo più accettabile. (Certo, anche sul commercio dei rettili come animali da compagnia si potrebbe discutere, ma questo esula dal nostro tema). Si tratta in definitiva di materiale biologico che andrebbe sprecato e distrutto, quindi perché non usarlo?

article-2107482-11DCE7C2000005DC-704_634x505

article-2107482-11F230BC000005DC-859_634x449

article-2107482-11F231D9000005DC-824_634x483
Ma preparare un animale comporta comunque il superamento di un fattore di disgusto che sembrerebbe incompatibile con il vegetarianismo: significa entrare in contatto diretto con la carne e il sangue, sventrare, spellare, raschiare e via dicendo. A quanto dice Margot, però, i suoi allievi vegetariani colgono una differenza fondamentale fra l’allevamento degli animali a fini alimentari – con tutti i problemi etici che l’industrializzazione del mercato della carne porta con sé – e la tassidermia, che è vista invece come un rispettoso atto d’amore per l’animale stesso. “La tassidermia per me significa essere stupiti dall’anatomia e dalla biologia delle creature, e aiutarle a continuare a vivere anche dopo la morte, in modo che noi possiamo vederle ed apprezzarle”, dice un suo studente.

La passione per la tecnica tassidermica proviene spesso dall’interesse per la storia naturale. Visitare un museo e ammirare splendidi animali esotici (che normalmente non potremmo vedere) perfettamente conservati, può far nascere la curiosità sui processi utilizzati per prepararli. E questo amore per gli animali, dice Margot, è una costante riconoscibile in tutti i suoi alunni.

article-2107482-11F22AA9000005DC-736_634x455
“Combatto con questo dilemma da un po’. – racconta un’altra artista vegetariana – La gente mi dice che ‘non dovrebbe piacermi’, ma ci sono piccole cose nella vita che ci danno gioia, e non possiamo farne a meno. Mi sembra che sia come donare all’animale una vita interamente nuova, permettergli di vivere per sempre in un nuovo mondo d’amore, per essere attentamente rimesso in sesto, posizionato e decorato, ed è un’impresa premurosa e amorevole”.

article-2107482-11F235DE000005DC-79_634x454
L’altro problema è che non tutti i lavori tassidermici sono “naturalistici”, cioè mirati a riprodurre esattamente l’animale nelle pose e negli atteggiamenti che aveva in vita. Non a caso facevamo l’esempio della tassidermia antropomorfica, in cui l’animale viene vestito e fissato in pose umane, talvolta inserito in contesti e diorami di fantasia, oppure integrato come parte di un accessorio di vestiario, un pendaglio, un anello. Si tratta di una tassidermia più personale, che riflette il gusto creativo dell’artista. Per alcuni questa pratica è irrispettosa dell’animale, ma non tutti la pensano così: secondo Margot e alcuni dei suoi studenti la cosa non crea alcun conflitto, fintanto che il corpo proviene da ambiti controllati.

article-2107482-11F233AB000005DC-674_634x453

“Credo che utilizzare animali provenienti da fonti etiche per la tassidermia sia positivo e, per questo motivo, posso continuare felicemente con il vegetarianismo e con il mio interesse di lunga data per la tassidermia. Sento di molti tassidermisti moderni che usano esclusivamente animali morti per cause naturali o in incidenti, quindi credo che ci troviamo in una nuova era di tassidermia etica. Sono felice di farne parte”.

C’è chi invece il problema l’ha aggirato del tutto. L’artista americana Aimée Baldwin ha creato quella che chiama “tassidermia vegana”: i suoi uccelli sono in realtà sculture costruite con carta crespa. Il lavoro certosino e la conoscenza del materiale, con cui sperimenta da anni, le permettono di ottenere un risultato incredibilmente realistico.

Vegan Taxidermy  An Intersection of Art, Science, and Conservation

Raven-360x240

Kingfisher432

HeronCity432

AmericanAvocet-288x432

Ecco il link all’articolo di Margot Magpie. Gran parte delle fotografie nell’articolo provengono da questo articolo su un workshop tassidermico newyorkese. Ecco infine il sito ufficiale di Aimée Baldwin.

The Monster Study

Vi sono molti disturbi ai quali la scienza non ha ancora saputo trovare un’origine e una causa certa.

Sotto il comune termine di “balbuzie” si è soliti raggruppare diversi tipi di impedimenti del linguaggio, più o meno gravi; al di là delle classificazioni specialistiche, ciò che risulta chiaro anche ai profani è che chi soffre di questo genere di disfluenze verbali finisce per essere sottoposto a forte stress, tanto da farsi problemi ad iniziare una conversazione, avere attacchi di ansia, e addirittura nei casi più estremi isolarsi dalla vita sociale. Si tratta di un circolo vizioso, perché se la balbuzie provoca ansia, l’ansia a sua volta ne aggrava i sintomi: la persona balbuziente, quindi, deve saper superare un continuo sentimento di inadeguatezza, lottando costantemente contro la perdita di controllo.

Le cause esatte della balbuzie non sono state scoperte, così come non è ancora stata trovata una vera e propria cura definitiva per il problema; è indubbio che il fattore ansiogeno sia comunque fondamentale, come dimostrano quelle situazioni in cui, a fronte di uno stress più ridotto (ad esempio, parlando al telefono), i sintomi tendono ad affievolirsi notevolmente se non a scomparire del tutto.

[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UB3N_nmeB9k]

Fra i primi a sottolineare l’importanza dell’aspetto psicologico della balbuzie (pensieri, attitudini ed emozioni dei pazienti) fu il Dr. Wendell Johnson. Riconosciuto oggi come uno dei più influenti patologi del linguaggio, egli focalizzò il suo lavoro su queste problematiche in un’epoca, gli anni ’30, in cui gli studi sul campo erano agli albori: eppure i dati raccolti nelle sue ricerche sui bambini balbuzienti sono ancora oggi i più numerosi ed esaustivi a disposizione degli psicologi.

wjoldcap
Nonostante le molte terapie efficaci da lui iniziate, e una vita intera dedicata alla comprensione e alla cura di questo disturbo (di cui egli stesso soffriva), Johnson viene spesso ricordato soltanto per un esperimento sfortunato e discutibile sotto il profilo etico, che nel tempo è divenuto tristemente famoso.

Wendell Johnson era convinto che la balbuzie non fosse genetica, ma che venisse invece fortemente influenzata da fattori esterni quali l’educazione, l’autostima e in generale l’ambiente di sviluppo del bambino. Per provare questa sua teoria, nel 1939 Johnson elaborò un complesso esperimento che affidò a una studentessa universitaria, Mary Tudor, sotto la sua supervisione. Lo scopo del progetto consisteva nel verificare quanto influissero i complimenti e i rimproveri sullo sviluppo del linguaggio: la Tudor avrebbe cercato di “curare” la balbuzie di alcuni bambini, lodando il loro modo di esprimersi, e allo stesso tempo – ecco che arriva la parte spinosa – di indurla in altri bambini perfettamente in grado di parlare, tramite continui attacchi alla loro autostima. Venne deciso che le piccole cavie umane sarebbero state dei bambini orfani, in quanto facili da reperire e privi di figure genitoriali che potessero interferire con il progetto.

In un orfanotrofio di veterani nello Iowa, Johnson e Tudor selezionarono ventidue bambini dai 5 ai 15 anni, che avevano tutti perso i genitori in guerra; fra questi, soltanto dieci erano balbuzienti. I bambini con problemi di balbuzie vennero divisi in due gruppi: a quelli del gruppo IA, sperimentale, la Tudor doveva ripetere che il loro linguaggio era ottimo, e che non avevano da preoccuparsi. Il gruppo IB, di controllo, non riceveva particolari suggestioni o complimenti.

Poi c’erano i dodici bambini che parlavano fluentemente: anche loro vennero divisi in due gruppi, IIA e IIB. I più fortunati erano quelli del secondo gruppo di controllo (IIB), che venivano educati in maniera normale e corretta. Il gruppo IIA, invece, è il vero e proprio pomo della discordia: ai bambini, tutti in grado di parlare bene, venne fatto credere che il loro linguaggio mostrasse un inizio preoccupante di balbuzie. La Tudor li incalzava, durante le sue visite, facendo notare ogni loro minimo inciampo, e recitando dei copioni precedentemente concordati con il suo docente: “Siamo arrivati alla conclusione che hai dei grossi problemi di linguaggio… hai molti dei sintomi di un bambino che comincia a balbettare. Devi cercare immediatamente di fermarti. Usa la forza di volontà… Fa’ qualunque cosa pur di non balbettare… Non parlare nemmeno finché non sai di poterlo fare bene. Vedi come balbetta quel bambino, vero? Beh, certamente ha iniziato proprio in questo modo”.

L’esperimento durò da gennaio a maggio, con Mary Tudor che parlava ad ogni bambino per 45 minuti ogni due o tre settimane. I bambini del gruppo IIA, bersagliati per i loro fantomatici difetti di pronuncia, accusarono immediatamente il trattamento: i loro voti peggiorarono, e la loro sicurezza si disintegrò totalmente. Una bambina di nove anni cominciò a rifiutarsi di parlare e a tenere gli occhi coperti da un braccio tutto il tempo, un’altra di cinque divenne molto silenziosa. Una ragazzina quindicenne, per evitare di balbettare, ripeteva “Ah” sempre più frequentemente fra una parola e l’altra; rimproverata anche per questo, cadde in una sorta di loop e iniziò a schioccare le dita per impedirsi di dire “Ah”.

I bambini della sezione IIA, nel corso dei cinque mesi dell’esperimento, divennero introversi e insicuri. La stessa Mary Tudor riteneva che la ricerca si fosse spinta troppo oltre: presa dai sensi di colpa, per ben tre volte dopo aver concluso l’esperimento Mary ritornò all’orfanotrofio per rimediare ai danni che era convinta di aver provocato. Così, di sua spontanea iniziativa, cercò di far capire ai bambini del gruppo IIA che, in realtà, non avevano mai veramente balbettato. Se questo tardivo moto di pietà sia servito a ridare sicurezza ai piccoli orfani, oppure abbia disorientato ancora di più le loro già confuse menti, non lo sapremo mai.

WJ 3

I risultati dell’esperimento dimostravano, secondo Johnson, che la balbuzie vera e propria poteva nascere da un errato riconoscimento del problema in famiglia: anche con le migliori intenzioni, i genitori potevano infatti scambiare per balbuzie dei piccoli difetti di linguaggio, perfettamente normali durante la crescita, e ingigantirli fino a portarli a livello di una vera e propria patologia. Lo psicologo si rese comunque conto che il suo esperimento poggiava su un confine etico piuttosto delicato, e decise di non pubblicarlo, ma di renderlo liberamente disponibile nella biblioteca dell’Università dello Iowa.

Passarono più di sessant’anni, quando nel 2001 un giornalista investigativo del San Jose Mercury News scoprì l’intera vicenda, e intuì subito di poterci costruire uno scoop clamoroso. Johnson, morto nel frattempo nel 1965, era ritenuto uno degli studiosi del linguaggio di più alto profilo, rispettato ed ammirato; il sensazionale furore mediatico che scaturì dalla rivelazione dell’esperimento alimentò un intenso dibattito sull’eticità del suo lavoro. L’Università si scusò pubblicamente per aver finanziato il “Monster Study” (com’era stato immediatamente ribattezzato dai giornali), e il 17 agosto 2007 sei degli orfani ancora in vita ottennero dallo Stato un risarcimento di 950.000 dollari, per le ferite psicologiche ed emotive sofferte a causa dall’esperimento.

Era davvero così “mostruoso” questo studio? I bambini del gruppo IIA rimasero balbuzienti per tutta la vita?

In realtà, non lo divennero mai, nonostante Johnson sostenesse di aver provato la sua tesi anti-genetica. Mary Tudor aveva parlato di “conseguenze inequivocabili” sulle abilità linguistiche degli orfani, eppure a nessuno dei bambini del gruppo IIA venne in seguito diagnosticata una balbuzie. Alcuni di loro riferirono in tribunale di essere diventati introversi, ma di vera e propria balbuzie indotta, neanche l’ombra.

Le valutazioni degli odierni patologi del linguaggio variano considerevolmente sugli effetti negativi che la ricerca di Johnson potrebbe aver provocato. Quanto all’eticità del progetto in sé, non va dimenticato che negli anni ’30 la sensibilità era differente, e non esisteva ancora alcuna direttiva scientifica internazionale riguardo gli esperimenti sugli esseri umani. A sorpresa, in tutto questo, l’aspetto più discutibile rimane quello scientifico: i professori Nicoline G. Ambrose e Ehud Yairi, in un’analisi dell’esperimento condotta dopo il 2001, si mostrano estremamente critici nei confronti dei risultati, viziati secondo loro dalla frettolosa e confusa progettazione e dai “ripensamenti” della Tudor. Anche l’idea che la balbuzie sia un comportamento che il bambino sviluppa a causa della pressione psicologica dei genitori – concetto di cui Johnson era strenuamente convinto e che ripeté come un mantra fino alla fine dei suoi giorni – non viene assolutamente corroborata dai dati dell’esperimento, visto che alcuni dei bambini in cui sarebbe dovuta insorgere la balbuzie avevano invece conosciuto addirittura dei miglioramenti.

La vera macchia nella brillante carriera di Johnson, quindi, non sarebbe tanto la sua mancanza di scrupoli, ma di scrupolo: la ricerca, una volta spogliata da tutti gli elementi sensazionalistici ed analizzata oggettivamente, si è rivelata meno grave del previsto nelle conseguenze, ma più pasticciata e tendenziosa nei risultati che proponeva.

Il Monster Study è ancora oggi un esperimento pressoché universalmente ritenuto infame e riprovevole, e di sicuro lo è secondo gli standard morali odierni, visto che ha causato un indubbio stress emotivo a un gruppo di minori già provati a sufficienza dalla morte dei genitori. Ma, come si è detto, erano altri tempi; di lì a poco si sarebbero conosciuti esperimenti umani ben più terrificanti, questa volta dalla nostra parte dell’Oceano.

Ad oggi, nonostante l’eziologia precisa del disturbo rimanga sconosciuta, si ritiene che la balbuzie abbia cause di tipo genetico e neurologico.

Amore materno

Sorry, this entry is only available in Italiano.

Little Albert

Abbiamo già parlato di quanto la medicina di inizio ‘900 andasse poco per il sottile quando si trattava di fare esperimenti su animali o sugli uomini stessi. Basta consultare, per una breve storia degli esperimenti umani, questa pagina (in inglese) che riporta le date essenziali della ricerca medico-scientifica condotta in maniera poco etica. Il sito ricorda che, dall’inoculazione di varie piaghe o malattie infettive (senza il consenso del paziente) fino agli esperimenti biochimici di massa, i ricercatori hanno spesso dimenticato il precetto di Ippocrate Primum non nocere.

Ma anche la psicologia, in quegli anni, non scherzava. Uno degli esperimenti più celebri, e divenuto presto un classico della psicologia, fu quello portato avanti da John B. Watson assieme alla sua collega Rosalie Rayner, e conosciuto con il nome Little Albert.

John Watson è il padre del comportamentismo, cioè quella branca della psicologia che nasceva dallo studio dell’etologia animale per applicarla all’uomo, nella convinzione che il comportamento fosse l’unico dato verificabile scientificamente. Ricordate il celebre cane di Pavlov, che sbavava non appena sentiva una campanella? Watson era convinto che il sistema di ricompensa e punizione fosse presente anche nell’uomo, o almeno nel bambino. Si spinse addirittura oltre, pensando di poter “programmare” la personalità di un individuo agendo attivamente sul suo sviluppo infantile. I suoi studi cercavano di comprendere come l’essere umano si sensibilizzasse a certi avvenimenti o a certe cose durante la precoce fase dei primi mesi di età. E siccome, a sentire lui, i suoi risultati gli davano ragione, arrivò ad affermare: “Datemi una dozzina di bambini sani e farò di ognuno uno specialista a piacere, un avvocato, un medico, ecc. a prescindere dal suo talento, dalle sue inclinazioni, tendenze, capacità, vocazioni e razza”. Negli anni ’20 pensare di poter programmare il futuro del proprio bambino sembrava un’utopia. Dopo il nazismo, l’opinione comune avrebbe cambiato rotta, e visto in simili idee di controllo un’offesa alla libertà individuale. Ma i campi di Buchenwald erano ancora distanti.

L’esperimento che rese celebre Watson fu compiuto durante i mesi a cavallo tra il 1919 e il 1920. Little Albert era un bambino sano di poco più di nove mesi di età. Nella prima fase dell’esperimento (i primi due mesi), Watson e Rayner misero in contatto il bambino con, nell’ordine: una cavia bianca, un coniglio, un cane, una scimmia, maschere con e senza barba, batuffoli di cotone, giornali in fiamme, ecc. Il piccolino non mostrava paura nei confronti di alcuno di questi oggetti. Ma Watson era intenzionato a cambiare le cose: nel giro di poche settimane, avrebbe forgiato per il piccolo Albert una bella fobia tutta nuova.

Quando l’esperimento vero e proprio iniziò c’erano alcune sorprese pronte per Albert, che aveva allora 11 mesi e 10 giorni. I ricercatori gli riproposero il contatto ravvicinato con uno degli stessi simpatici animaletti con cui aveva imparato a giocare: la cavia da laboratorio. Ma ora, ogni volta che tendeva una mano per accarezzare il topolino, i ricercatori battevano con un martello una barra d’acciaio posta dietro il bambino, provocando un forte e spaventoso rumore – BANG! Toccava con l’indice il topolino – BANG! Cercava di raggiungere il topolino – BANG! Ci riprovava – BANG!

Il piccolo Albert cominciò a piangere, a cercare di scappare, ad allontanare con i piedi l’animale non appena lo vedeva. Era stato efficacemente programmato per temere i topi. I ricercatori volevano però capire se si fosse instaurato un transfert che provocava l’avversione verso oggetti con qualità similari. Ed era successo proprio questo. Dopo 17 giorni la sua fobia si estese al cotone, alle coperte, alle pelliccie. Infine, anche la sola vista di una maschera da Babbo Natale con la barba lo faceva piangere a dirotto. L’insegnamento era stato recepito: le cose con il pelo sono spaventose e spiacevoli perché fanno BANG.

Dopo un mese di esperimenti, proprio quando il professor Watson voleva cominciare le sue prove di de-programmazione, riportando il bambino a una risposta normale, la madre lo portò via e più nulla si seppe di lui. Già, la madre. Il mistero intorno a chi fosse realmente Little Albert e che razza di vita abbia avuto dopo questo esperimento, e se la madre fosse consenziente, è rimasto oscuro per anni. Le leggende si sprecavano. Finalmente, dopo un’accurata ricerca, sembra che la verità sia venuta a galla. Little Albert era figlio di una balia che allattava e curava i bambini invalidi alla Phipps Clinic presso la Johns Hopkins University di Baltimora dove Watson e Rayner conducevano l’esperimento. Era a conoscenza di cosa stavano facendo al suo bambino, e probabilmente lo portò via con sé quando vide l’effetto che la ricerca aveva prodotto sul suo neonato.

L’esperimento, è doveroso segnalarlo, divenne davvero un classico e aprì la strada per nuove ricerche (con il senno di poi, meno irresponsabili) che continuano tutt’oggi. In quegli anni nessuno sembrò preoccuparsi più di tanto di Albert, ma piuttosto degli incredibili e fino ad allora inediti risultati della ricerca. Non possiamo però sapere se la vita più “normale” che lo attendeva avrebbe potuto sanare le ferite aperte dall’esperimento nel piccolo Albert, se con il tempo sarebbe forse guarito, perché nel 1925 il bambino morì di idrocefalia, sviluppatasi tre anni prima.

[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9hBfnXACsOI]

L’articolo originale di Watson & Rayner è consultabile qui. E qui trovate la pagina di Wikipedia sull’esperimento.