Links, Curiosities & Mixed Wonders – 14

  • Koko, the female gorilla who could use sign language, besides painting and loving kittens, died on June 19th. But Koko was not the first primate to communicate with humans; the fisrt, groundbreaking attempt to make a monkey “talk” was carried out in quite a catastrophic way, as I explained in this old post (Italian only – here’s the Wiki entry).
  • Do you need bugs, butterflies, cockroaches, centipedes, fireflies, bees or any other kind of insects for the movie you’re about to shoot? This gentleman creates realistic bug props, featured in the greatest Hollywood productions. (Thanks, Federico!)
  • If you think those enlarge-your-penis pumps you see in spam emails are a recently-invented contraption, here’s one from the 19th Century (taken from Albert Moll, Handbuch der Sexualwissenschaften, 1921).

  • Ghanaian funerals became quite popular over the internet on the account of the colorful caskets in the shape of tools or barious objects (I talked about it in the second part of this article — Italian only), but there’s a problem: lately the rituals have become so complicated and obsessive that the bodies of the deceased end up buried months, or even several years, after death.
  • This tweet.
  • 1865: during the conquest of Matterhorn, a strange and upsetting apparition took place. In all probability it was an extremely rare atmospheric phenomenon, but put yourselves in the shoes of those mountain climbers who had just lost four members of the team while ascending to the peak, and suddenly saw an arc and two enormous crosses floating in the sky over the fog.
  • The strange beauty of time-worn daguerrotypes.

  • What’s so strange in these pictures of a man preparing some tacos for a nice dinner with his friends?
    Nothing, apart from the fact that the meat comes from his left foot, which got amputated after an accident.

Think about it: you lose a leg, you try to have it back after the operation, and you succeed. Before cremating it, why not taste a little slice of it? It is after all your leg, your foot, you won’t hurt anybody and you will satiate your curiosity. Ethical cannibalism.
This is what a young man decided to try, and he invited some “open-minded” friends to the exclusive tasting event. Then, two years later, he decided to report on Reddit how the evening went. The human-flesh tacos were apparently quite appreciated by the group, with the exception of one tablemate (who, in the protagonist’s words, “had to spit me on a napkin“).
The experiment, conducted without braking any law since in the US there is none to forbid cannibalism, did raise some visceral reactions, as you would expect; the now-famous self-cannibal was even interviewed on Vice. And he stated that this little folly helped him to overcome his psychological thrauma: “eating my foot was a funny and weird and interesting way to move forward“.

  • Since we’re talking disgust: a new research determined that things that gross us out are organized in six main categories. At the first place, it’s no surprise to find infected wounds and hygiene-related topics (bad smells, excrements, atc.), perhaps because they act as signals for potentially harmful situations in which our bodies run the risk of contracting a disease.
  • Did someone order prawns?
    In Qingdao, China, the equivalent of a seafood restaurant fell from the sky (some photos below). Still today, rains of animals remain quite puzzling.

EDIT: This photo is fake (not the others).

  • In Sweden there is a mysterious syndrom: it only affects Soviet refugee children who are waiting to know if their parents’ residency permit will be accepted.
    It’s called “resignation syndrome”. The ghost of forced repatriation, the stress of not knowing the language and the exhausting beaurocratic procedures push these kids first into apathy, then catatonia and eventually into a coma.  At first this epidemic was thought to be some kind of set-up or sham, but doctors soon understood this serious psychological alteration is all but fake: the children can lie in a coma even for two years, suffer from relapses, and the domino effect is such that from 2015 to 2016 a total of 169 episodes were recorded.
    Here’s an article on this dramatic condition. (Thanks, David!)

Anatomy of the corset.

  • Nuke simulator: choose where to drop the Big One, type and kilotons, if it will explode in the air or on the ground. Then watch in horror and find out the effects.
  • Mari Katayama is a Japanese artist. Since she was a child she started knitting peculiar objects, incorporating seashells and jewels in her creations. Suffering from ectrodactyly, she had both legs amputated when she was 9 years old. Today her body is the focus of her art projects, and her self-portraits, in my opinion, are a thing of extraordinary beauty. Here are some of ther works.
    (Official website, Instagram)

Way back when, medical students sure knew how to pull a good joke (from this wonderful book).

  • The big guy you can see on the left side in the picture below is the Irish Giant Charles Byrne (1761–1783), and his skeleton belongs to the Hunterian Museum in London. It is the most discussed specimen of the entire anatomical collection, and for good reason: when he was still alive, Byrne clearly stated that he wanted to be buried at sea, and categorically refused the idea of his bones being exhibited in a museum — a thought that horrified him.
    When Byrne died, his friends organized his funeral in the coastal city of Margate, not knowing that the casket was actually full of stones: anatomist William Hunter had bribed an undertaker to steal the Giant’s valuable body. Since then, the skeleton was exhibited in the museum and, even if it certainly contributed to the study of acromegalia and gigantism, it has always been a “thorny” specimen from an ethical perspective.
    So here’s the news: now that the Hunterian is closed for a 3-year-long renovation, the museum board seems to be evaluating the possibility of buring Byrne’s skeletal remains. If that was the case, it would be a game changer in the ethical exhibit of human remains in museums.

  • Just like a muder mystery: a secret diary written on the back of floorboards in a French Castle, and detailing crime stories and sordid village affairs. (Thanks, Lighthousely!)
  • The most enjoyable read as of late is kindly offered by the great Thomas Morris, who found a  delightful medical report from 1852. A gentleman, married with children but secretly devoted to onanism, first tries to insert a slice of a bull’s penis into his own penis, through the urethra. The piece of meat gets stuck, and he has to resort to a doctor to extract it. Not happy with this result, he  decides to pass a 28 cm. probe through the same opening, but thing slips from his fingers and disappears inside him. The story comes to no good for our hero; an inglorious end — or maybe proudly libertine, you decide.
    It made me think of an old saying: “never do anything you wouldn’t be caught dead doing“.

That’s all for now folks!

My week of English wonders – II

(Continued from the previous post)

The Viktor Wynd Museum of Curiosities, Fine Art & Natural History still resides in its original location, in Mare Street, Hackney, East London (some years ago I sent over a trusted correspondant and published his ironic reportage).
Many things have changed since then: in 2014, the owner launched a 1-month Kickstarter campaign which earned him £ 16,000, allowing him to turn his eclectic collection into a proper museum, complete with a small cocktail bar, an art gallery and an underground dinining room. Just a couple of tables, to be precise; but it’s hard to think of another place where guests can dine around an authentic 19th century skeleton.

LTS1

The outrageous bad taste of placing human remains inside a dinner table is a good example of the sacrilegious vein that runs through the whole disposition of objects collected by Viktor: here the very idea of the museum as a high-culture institution is deconstructed and openly mocked. Refined works of art lay beside pornographic paperbacks, rare and precious ancient artifacts are on display next to McDonald’s Happy Meal toy surprises.

But this is not a meaningless jumble — it goes back to the original idea of a Museum being the domain of the Muses, a place of inspiration, of mysterious and unexpected connections, of a real attack to the senses. And this wunderkammer could infuriate wunderkammern purists.

LTS2

LTS4

LTS8

When I met up with him, Viktor Wynd didn’t even need to talk about himself. Among dodo bones, giant crabs, anatomical models, skulls and unique books, unmatched from their very titles — for instance Group Sex: A How-To Guide, or If You Want Closure in Your Relationship, Start with Your Legs — the museum owner was immersed in the objectification of his boundless imagination. As he moved along the display cases in his immense collection (insured for 1 million pounds), he looked like he was wandering through the rooms of his own mind.
Artist, surrealist and intellectual dandy, his life story as fascinating as his projects, Viktor always talks about the Museum as an inevitable necessity: “I need beauty and the uncanny, the funny and the silly, the odd and the rare. Rare and beautiful things are the barrier between me and a bottomless pit of misery and despair“.

And this strange bistro of wonders, where he holds conferences, cocktail parties, masqued balls, exhibitions, dinners, is certainly a rare and beautiful thing.

LTS3

LTS5

LTS7

I then moved to the London Bridge area. In front of Borough Market is St. Thomas Street, where old St. Thomas church stands embedded between modern buildings. It was not the church itself I was interested in, but rather its garret.
The attic under the church’s roof hosts a little known museum with a peculiar history.

OOTHB1

OOTHB8

OOTHB6

OOTHB2

The Old Operating Theatre Museum and Herb Garret is located in the space where all pharmaceuticals were prepared and stored, to be used in the annexed St. Thomas Hospital. A first section of the museum is dedicated to medicinal plants and antique therapeutic instruments. On display are several devices no longer in use, such as tools for cupping, bleeding and trepanation, and other quite menacing contraptions. But, together with its unique location, what gives this part of the museum its almost fantastic dimension is the sharp fragrance of dried flowers, herbs and spices (typical of other ancient pharmacies).

OOTHB3

OOTHB4

OOTHB5

OOTHB7

OOTHB9

OOTHB10

OOTHB11

OOTHB12

If the pharmacy is thought to have been active since the 18th Century, only in 1822 a part of the garret was transformed into operating theatre — one of the oldest in Europe.
Here the patients from the female ward were operated. They were mostly poor women, who agreed to go under the knife before a crowd of medicine students, but in return were treated by the best surgeons available at the time, a privilege they could not have afforded otherwise.
Operations were usually the last resort, when all other remedies had failed. Without anestetics, unaware of the importance of hygiene measures, surgeons had to rely solely on their own swiftness and precision (see for instance my post about Robert Liston). The results were predictable: despite all efforts, given the often already critical conditions of the patients, intraoperative and postoperative mortality was very high.

OOTHB13

OOTHB14

OOTHB15

OOTHB16

OOTHB17

OOTHB18

The last two places awaiting me in London turned out to be the only ones where photographs were not allowed. And this is a particularly interesting detail.

The first was of course the Hunterian Museum.
Over two floors are displayed thousands of veterinary and human anatomical specimens collected by famed Scottish surgeon John Hunter (in Leicester Square you can see his sculpted bust).
Among them, the preparations acquired by John Evelyn in Padua stand out as the oldest in Europe, and illustrate the vascular and nervous systems. The other “star” of the Museum is the skeleton of Charles Byrne, the “Irish giant” who died in 1783. Byrne was so terrified of ending up in an anatomical museum that he hired some fishermen to throw his corpse offshore. This unfortunately didn’t stop John Hunter who, determined to take possession of that extraordinary body, bribed the fishermen and paid a huge amount of money to get hold of his trophy.

The specimens, some of which pathological, are extremely interesting and yet everything seemed a bit cold if compared to the charm of old Italian anatomy museums, or even to the garret I had just visited in St. Thomas Church. What I felt was missing was the atmosphere, the narrative: the human body, especially the pathological body, in my view is a true theatrical play, a tragic spectacle, but here the dramatic dimension was carefully avoided. Upon reading the museum labels, I could actually perceive a certain urgency to stress the value and expressly scientific purpose of the collection. This is probably a response to the debate on ethical implications of displaying human remains in museums, a topic which gained much attention in the past few years. The Hunterian Museum is, after all, the place where the bones of the Irish giant, unscrupulously stolen to the ocean waves, are still displayed in a big glass case and might seem “helpless” under the visitors’ gaze.

My last place of wonder, and one of London’s best-kept secrets, is the Wildgoose Memorial Library.
The work of one single person, artist Jane Wildgoose, this library is part of her private home, can be visited by appointment and reached through a series of directions which make the trip look like a tresure hunt.
And a tresure it is indeed.

Jane is a kind and gentle spirit, the incarnation of serene hospitality.
Before disappearing to make some coffee, she whispered: “take your time to skim the titles, or to leaf through a couple of pages… and to read the objects“.
The objects she was referring to are really the heart of her library, which besides the books also houses plaster casts, sculptures, Victorian mourning hair wreaths, old fans and fashion items, daguerrotypes, engravings, seashells, urns, death masks, animal skulls. Yet, compared to so many other collections of wonders I have seen over the years, this one struck me for its compositional grace, for the evident, painstaking attention accorded to the objects’ disposition. But there was something else, which eluded me at that moment.

As Jane came back into the room holding the coffee tray, I noticed her smile looked slightly tense. In her eyes I could guess a mixture of expectation and faint embarassement. I was, after all, an outsider she had intentionally let into the cosiness of her home. If the miracle of a mutual harmony was to happen, this could turn out to be one of those rare moments of actual contact between strangers; but the stakes were high. This woman was presenting me with everything she held most sacred — “a poet is a naked person“, Bob Dylan once wrote — and now it all came down to my sensibility.

We began to talk, and she told me of her life spent safeguarding objects, trying to understand them, to recognize their hidden relationships: from the time when, as a child, she collected seashells on the southern shores of England, up to her latest art installations. Little by little, I started to realize what was that specific trait in her collection which at first I could not clearly pinpoint: the empathy, the humanity.
The Wildgoose Memorial Library is not meant to explore the concept of death, but rather the concept of grief. Jane is interested in the traces of our passage, in the signs that sorrow inevitably leaves behind, in the absence, in the longing and loss. This is what lies at the core of her works, commissioned by the most prestigious institutions, in which I feel she is attempting to process unresolved, unknown bereavements. That’s why she patiently fathoms the archives searching for traces of life and sorrow; that’s why her attention for the soul of things enabled her to see, for instance, how a cold catalogue accompanying the 1786 sale of Margaret Cavendish’s goods after her death could actually be the Duchess’s most intimate portrait, a key to unearthing her passions and her friendships.

This living room, I realized, is where Jane tries to mend heartaches — not just her own, but also those of her fellow human beings, and even those of the deceased.

And suddenly the Hunterian Museum came to my mind.
There, as in this living room, human remains were present.
There, as in this living room, the objects on display spoke about suffering and death.
There, as in this living room, pictures were not allowed, for the sake of respect and discretion.

Yet the two collections could not be more distant from each other, placed at opposite extremes of the spectrum.
On one hand, the aseptic showcases, the modern setting from which all emotion is removed, where the Obscene Body (in order to be explained, and accepted by the public) must be filtered through a detached, scientific gaze. The same Museum which, ironically, has to deal with the lack of ethics of its founders, who lived in a time when collecting anatomical specimens posed very little moral dilemmas.
On the other, this oasis of meditation, a personal vision of human beings and their impermanence enclosed in the warm, dark wood of Jane Wildgoose’s old library; a place where compassion is not only tangible, it gets under your skin; a place which can only exist because of its creator’s ethical concerns. And, ultimately, a research facility addressing death as an essential experience we should not be afraid of: it’s no accident the library is dedicated to Persephone because, as Jane pointed out, there’s “no winter without summer“.

Perhaps we need both opposites, as we would with two different medicines. To study the body without forgetting about the soul, and viceversa.
On the express train back to the airport, I stared at a clear sky between the passing trees. Not a single cloud in sight. No rain without sun, I told myself. And so much for the preconceptions I held at the beginning of my journey.

Il corpo del gigante

We have already told many stories about the big family of human wonders, those unique and peculiar people that we call freaks – but in the affectionate meaning, to claim diversity as a value, as something to be proud of.
As happens to many freaks, the life of Edouard Beaupré began in a completely ordinary way and without any presage of an extraordinary future. Born on January 9, 1881, Edouard was the first child baptized in the small community of
Willow Bunch, in the Canadian prairies, that today has less than three hundreds inhabitants.

He was the eldest of the twenty children of Florestine Piché and Gaspard Beaupré, and during the first three years of his life, he didn’t show any distinguishing mark; but things were soon to change. The child began to grow at incredible speed: at the age of nine, he was already 1.83 metre tall. The boy’s body continued to steadily grow in weight and stature, and it was impossible to check his prodigious development.

edouardbeaupre (4)

All things considered Edouard was still a handsome boy, sweet and kind, a very skilful rider, and dreamt of becoming a cowboy. But luck was definitely not on his side: one day, while he was trying to tame an over-excited horse, the animal planted a violent kick on his face and the hoof broke his nasal septum.

ca79d6bff1af58e9b9a7a10585420e38

Now the giant was also disfigured. Pressed by his parents, he therefore decided to enter the show business, relying on his extraordinary body, in order to financially support his family.
Edouard started touring Canada and the United States and his popularity grew until he was even hired by Barnum & Bailey, the biggest and most popular of all circuses.

CG-Geant-Beaupre-1

1a8beba529461043dad48f1b5c44974e

Gigantism often involves bone and muscle problems and most giants, in spite of their body size, are very fragile and weak. This was not the case of Edouard Beaupré, whose physique was at the heart of his show: he merged, so to speak, two different traditional sideshow figures in one single performer – he was at the same time a giant and a strongman.

His show consisted of several trials of strength and weightlifting. But it was the final coup de théâtre that invariably left the audience amazed and breathless. Edouard had one of his beloved horses called on the track. He playfully explained that, when he was a boy, he had given up on his dream of becoming a cowboy because, even when he was riding the tallest horse, his legs touched the ground; now he used the animal to keep himself fit… this said, Edouard bent under the horse and, shouldering the beast, lifted it above the ground. Thus lifting more than 4 hundred kilos.

r-a3465

tumblr_n84t3kQsf01qcw9y0o1_1280

edouardbeaupre (5)

On the 25th March 1901 Edouard, although exhausted by a disease that the following year would turn out to be tuberculosis, had a wrestling match with Louis Cyr, who is still considered the strongest man of all times – he could lift 227 kilograms with a finger and carry almost two tons on his back. On that occasion Edouard was officially measured: he was 2.37 metres tall. The match lasted a very short time: the giant was defeated in the twinkling of an eye because he did not even dare touch the great champion. According to those who knew him well, maybe Edouard – who was kind by nature – was afraid to hurt his opponent.

edouard_beaupre10

On the 3rd of July 1904, after his usual performance at the Saint Louis World’s Fair, Beaupré collapsed. The steady and inexorable growth, and tuberculosis had prevailed over his physique and caused a pulmonary hemorrhage. When he was carried to the hospital, Edouard was at death’s door and just had the time to mutter how sad it was to die so young and so far from his parents. So the famous Willow Bunch Giant passed away, when he was only 23.
But this was not the end of his story.

Édouard_Beaupré

A certain Dr. Gradwohl carried out a post-mortem on his corpse and, as expected, found a pituitary tumour that had probably caused Edouard’s gigantism. Then the corpse was entrusted to the care of a funeral firm, Eberle & Keyes, to be embalmed and prepared for burial. The corpse should have returned to Edouard’s home village, but the circus manager, William Burke, convinced the Beaupré family that costs would be too high and that Edouard would be given a proper burial also where he was. When his parents gave their consent, they didn’t suspect that Burke was not willing to pay a penny. Burke cut and ran after making his parents believe that the funeral had been held and that their son was buried in St. Louis cemetery. He left the corpse at the funeral home and left again with the circus heading to another town.

The managers of the funeral home, enraged because they hadn’t been paid, decided to display the giant’s body in the shop window in order to recover the expenses for the embalming. This did not last for long, because after a few days the police asked to remove it from the public views. So began the odyssey of Edouard’s corpse: at the beginning it was sold to a traveling showman, then was brought back to Montréal by a friend of the Beaupré family, Pascal Bonneau. There it was exhibited for six months at the Eden Museum in Rue St. Laurent, a sort of squalid wax museum; and yet the queue people formed to see the giant was so long that it blocked the street. Around 1907 the corpse became the propriety of the Montréal Circus, another waning reality. Exhibited on a catafalque, the embalmed corpse was an easy prey to dampness, that damaged it, until the circus went bankrupt. Accused of “unauthorised corpse exhibition”, the proprietors left Edouard’s remains in a shed in Bellerive city park. Horrified, some children discovered it, while they were playing in the park.

Huge body of man found by children to Bellerive Park – a lush but poor part of town. The local doctor was called, and I was notified that it was in the presence of a giant human. The condition of the remains is not specified. I bought this amazing discovery with high hopes for the search and examination. The doctor asked me for sneaking that can cost such a treasure. I told him to bring the corpse, a lot.These words were noted down on the journal of Dr. Louis-Napoléon Délorme – who was fond of deformities – that paid 25 dollars for Edouard’s body. Considering the poor conditions of the corpse, he went on to mummify it, and used it for several dissections with his students at the Montréal University. The giant finally found a new accommodation, at the Faculty of Medicine, where it was potted in a display cabinet.

edouardbeaupre

10bed7b9fd59434681bf222d780d02b6

Edouard Beaupré remained there until the 1970s, when his nephew Ovila Lespérance asked the University to return the remains of the giant of Willow Bunch to his family. In 1989 the academic committee consented to the cremation of Edouard’s remains, that on the 7th of July 1990 were finally inhumed in the small Canadian town. Today a life-size statue reproduces Beaupré’s features and tourists can also compare their own feet to the track left by a shoe of the gentle giant. Who, after 85 years of vicissitudes, rests in peace at last.

3614609457_07da02077b_z

willo-bunch-giant  2013-07-04_126_sas_can

51B69C4B-1560-95DA-43CED657D4459BA8

The contents of this article are mostly taken from The Anatomy of Edouard Beaupré, by Sarah Kathryn York.

coteaubooks-com-Edouard-Beaupre

Un incontro improbabile

1958, Grenoble, Francia. I coniugi Roussimouff erano due contadini; Boris proveniva dalla Bulgaria e sua moglie Mariann dalla Polonia. La loro vita scorreva placida seguendo il ritmo del lavoro nei campi, finché divenne chiaro che il loro figlio aveva un problema: la sua crescita era abnorme ed evidentemente patologica, tanto che a 12 anni pesava 110 kg, ed era alto 190,5 cm. La sua stazza era dovuta a una secrezione eccessiva di ormone della crescita, che causa il gigantismo nei bambini e l’acromegalia negli adulti.
Ben presto per il ragazzo divenne impossibile salire sul piccolo autobus che faceva il giro delle fattorie, raccogliendo gli alunni e portandoli fino a scuola. L’unico modo per garantire che loro figlio ricevesse un’istruzione sarebbe stato acquistare un’automobile capace di reggere il suo peso per accompagnarlo alle lezioni; sfortunatamente i Roussimouff non avevano i soldi necessari.

Cinque anni prima, però, un irlandese aveva acquistato un terreno vicino alla loro fattoria. Boris Roussimouff gli aveva dato una mano nella costruzione del cottage, e da allora erano rimasti in buoni rapporti. Venuto a sapere dei problemi del ragazzo ad arrivare a scuola, l’irlandese si offrì di accompagnarlo con il suo pickup. Così, ogni mattina il gigantesco ragazzo e il vicino di casa percorrevano assieme il tragitto verso l’edificio scolastico.

Questa potrebbe non sembrare una storia tanto straordinaria, se non fosse per l’identità dei due protagonisti. L’irlandese alla guida del furgoncino non era altri che Samuel Beckett:all’epoca aveva già scritto Aspettando Godot, Finale di partita e L’ultimo nastro di Krapp e dieci anni dopo sarebbe stato insignito del Premio Nobel per la Letteratura. Il ragazzo dodicenne che viaggiava con lui, invece, avrebbe raggiunto una fama di tutt’altro tenore, diventando un idolo per milioni di bambini con il nome di scena di André The Giant.

Icona del wrestling dagli anni ’70 fino alla sua scomparsa nel 1993, André The Giant resta tuttora uno dei lottatori più riconoscibili e amati. Gigante gentile e di buon cuore con i bambini, ma terribile avversario sul ring, è ricordato da tutti i colleghi con affetto e simpatia. Hulk Hogan, nonostante sia stato protagonista con André di alcuni fra i più celebri feud (ossia le “faide” fra lottatori, appositamente sceneggiate e concordate per dare un contesto narrativo agli incontri), ha sempre mostrato nelle varie interviste una stima e un rispetto profondi per il gigante francese. Nella  vita di André, ha spesso ricordato Hogan, niente era comodo o scontato; non c’erano forchette o coltelli della sua misura, e i viaggi in aereo erano un incubo di ore e ore: durante il volo, il gigante doveva rimanere con la testa piegata per non toccare il soffitto, e il bagno era per lui inaccessibile a causa della sua stazza. Nonostante i problemi che l’acromegalia comportava, André era famoso per la sua generosità e la conviviale allegria. Poteva mangiare 12 bistecche e 15 aragoste, bevendo fino a 150 birre in una sola sera, soltanto per divertire i suoi ospiti.

Di cosa avranno parlato nel 1958, in quel furgoncino, questi due uomini straordinari — “l’Ottava Meraviglia del Mondo” e Samuel Beckett? Secondo André The Giant, discutevano semplicemente di cricket, disciplina sportiva nella quale il grande scrittore aveva eccelso da ragazzo.

D’altronde la storia non è avara di incontri così inverosimili, in cui strade e vite diversissime fra loro si incrociano per puro caso. Ad esempio, quando era un giovane studente fra la Germania e l’Austria, Orson Welles accompagnò un insegnante ad un raduno politico vicino a Innsbruck. Si trattava di un partito di minoranza, piuttosto comico nella follia del suo programma, a cui nessuno dava grande credito. L’insegnante riuscì a guadagnare un posto, per sé e per l’adolescente Welles, al tavolo del leader del partito.

L’uomo che sedeva di fianco a me — ricorderà Welles nel 1970, intervistato durante il Dick Cavett Show — era Hitler, e mi impressionò talmente poco che non riesco a ricordare nemmeno un secondo di conversazione. Non aveva assolutamente nessuna personalità. Era invisibile“.

Il giocattolo del Gigante

C’era una volta una famiglia di Giganti che stava attraversando le Alpi: scavalcando le montagne, falcata dopo falcata, verso chissà quale destinazione.
Il figlioletto, un bambino alto circa 100 metri, piangeva a dirotto, e i suoi singhiozzi riecheggiavano per le valli. Era disperato perché aveva perso il suo coniglio di peluche; ma purtroppo non c’era tempo per tornare indietro a cercarlo. Mamma Gigantessa lo prese in braccio per consolarlo, e la marcia continuò.

Questo è quanto potremmo immaginare imbattendoci nella strana fotografia satellitare qui sotto. Cosa ci fa un enorme coniglio rosa a 1600 metri di altitudine sulle montagne piemontesi?

Posto sul Colletto Fava vicino al Bar La Baita, proprio sopra al paesino di Artesina in provincia di Cuneo, il coniglio è lungo 50 metri, ricoperto di lana, imbottito con mille metri cubi di paglia, ed ha richiesto cinque anni di lavoro a maglia. È stato creato nel 2005 dal collettivo viennese Gelitin, composto da quattro artisti dalle idee bizzarre e spesso geniali.

Ma non lasciatevi ingannare: se l’idea di un coniglio rosa gigante vi sembra fin troppo kawaii, l’installazione ha in realtà un effetto davvero perturbante. Le dimensioni innaturali del peluche contrastano con il paesaggio, il colore rosa shocking lo stacca dal resto del panorama: l’idea di posizionarlo lontano dalle gallerie d’arte o dai centri urbani, elemento artificiale “abbandonato” in un contesto naturale, contribuisce alla sensazione di disagio. La posa del peluche, inoltre, dà l’inquietante impressione di qualcosa di morto e in effetti le interiora del coniglio (cuore, fegato, budella, tutte di lana) fuoriescono dal suo fianco.

E non è tutto. Il coniglio resterà esposto agli elementi fino al 2025. Questo significa che i visitatori potranno, nel tempo, assistere a una vera e propria dissoluzione dell’opera d’arte; già adesso, a distanza di quasi dieci anni dall’inizio del progetto, la decomposizione del coniglio è in fase avanzata. Se fino a qualche tempo fa ci si poteva ancora arrampicare sul corpo del peluche, e sdraiarsi sul suo petto a prendere il sole, oggi l’installazione comincia a mostrare il suo lato più crudele e beffardo. Le intemperie hanno squarciato in più punti la superficie del pupazzo, esponendo la paglia sottostante e donando al povero coniglio l’aspetto di una vera e propria carcassa.

Il collettivo artistico austriaco, ben conscio dell’effetto destabilizzante che nel tempo avrebbe assunto l’opera, ha usato queste splendide righe per descrivere il proprio lavoro:

Le cose che si possono trovare vagando nel paesaggio: cose familiari, e completamente sconosciute, come un fiore che non si è mai visto prima oppure, come Colombo scoprì, un continente inesplicabile; e poi, dietro una collina, come lavorato a maglia da nonne giganti, giace questo vasto coniglio, per farti sentire piccolo come una margherita.
La creatura, rosa come carta igienica, è sdraiata sulla schiena: una montagna-coniglio come Gulliver a Lilliput.
Che felicità scalarlo lungo le orecchie, quasi cadendo nella sua bocca cavernosa, fino alla cima della pancia, e guardare verso il rosa panorama lanoso del corpo del coniglio, un paese caduto dal cielo; orecchie e arti che si dipanano verso l’orizzonte; dal suo fianco veder fluire il cuore, il fegato e gli intestini.
Felicemente innamorato scendi dal cadavere putrescente, verso la ferita, ora piccolo come una larva, sopra i reni e le budella di lana.
Felice te ne vai come la larva che acquista le sue ali da una carcassa innocente sul bordo della strada.
Tale è la felicità che diede forma a questo coniglio.
Io amo il coniglio e il coniglio mi ama.

Fra dieci anni, quando l’opera si potrà dire definitivamente conclusa, del coniglio gigante non rimarrà più traccia. Sarà stato “digerito” e assorbito dalla natura, come accade a tutto e a tutti.

Ecco il sito del collettivo Gelitin.

L’Angelo Francese

shrek_05

Nato negli Urali nel 1903 da genitori francesi, Maurice Tillet aveva un’intelligenza viva e un fisico atletico invidiabile. Gli amici erano impressionati dalla sua abilità nel parlare diverse lingue, e a causa dei lineamenti dolci del suo volto l’avevano soprannominato “Angelo”. Durante la Rivoluzione Russa la sua famiglia ritornò precipitosamente in Francia, stabilendosi a Reims. E lì cominciarono i problemi.

All’età di 17 anni, Maurice cominciò a notare dei dolorosi rigonfiamenti sul suo corpo. Si trattava, come avrebbe purtroppo scoperto in fretta, dei primi sintomi di acromegalia. Ma se la malattia causa talvolta stature gigantesche, in Maurice operò un cambiamento differente: la statura rimase normale, ma il suo torace divenne cilindrico e, oltre alle mani e ai piedi, la parte del corpo che cominciò davvero a crescere a dismisura fu la faccia. Proprio quel volto un tempo angelico che gli era valso il soprannome, ora lo faceva assomigliare a un orco o un uomo delle caverne.

maurice-tillet-becomes-a-us-citizen

4304937426_a5c76eaa45_o

A causa del suo nuovo aspetto, Maurice dovette rinunciare al suo sogno di una carriera da avvocato, e per cinque anni lavorò nella Marina come ingegnere. Mentre era imbarcato nell’esercito, a Singapore, Tillet conobbe un promoter di wrestling che lo convinse a provare ad entrare in quello sport. Maurice scoprì di avere del talento nell’arte della lotta, e sicuramente il suo aspetto incuteva un certo timore negli avversari, avvantaggiandolo. Con il nome d’arte di “Angelo Francese”, disputò incontri di grande successo in Europa, e quando si trasferì in America, a causa della Guerra, cominciò ad inanellare una serie di vittorie impressionanti. I fan del wrestling erano elettrizzati dalla sua figura così come dalla sua tecnica potente, anche perché il suo personaggio sembrava collegare due mondi che finora erano rimasti distanti: quello dello sport e quello dei fenomeni da baraccone, i freak ammirati nei sideshow itineranti di mezzo mondo.

Coming right at ya - Maurice Tillet

Angel - Maurice Tillet 01-23-40

Alter-Ego

The Angel and

The Angel and Wadislaw

Nel 1940, Tillet venne esaminato dall’antropologo Carleton Coon (autore di alcune sfortunate teorie sull’origine e la storia delle razze), mentre le macchine fotografiche di LIFE seguivano l’incontro: l’etnologo annotò le misure della mandibola, della testa, dei piedi e delle mani giganteschi, e concluse che Maurice potesse rappresentare “una regressione all’uomo di Neanderthal”. Per quanto ai nostri occhi oggi possa sembrare una diagnosi assurda e infamante, per un atleta che combatteva quotidianamente (gli avversari sul ring, la sua malattia fuori dal quadrato), il servizio fotografico gli regalò un’immensa notorietà, tanto che Tillet cominciò a sfruttare a suo favore il personaggio dell’uomo preistorico.

Time Maurice March 4th 1940 - 4

Maurice - Milwaukee Journal March 18th 1940

Natural History Museum -Neanderthal -tillet

Photo back ANGEL compared to Neanderthal 3-30-40

Maurice3 maurice-tillet-the-french-angel

Sulla scia della sua fama, cominciarono a spuntare come funghi gli imitatori: tutti dall’aspetto di cavernicoli, e tutti con il suo stesso nome d’arte. L’Angelo Russo, l’Angelo Canadese, l’Angelo Irlandese, il Polacco, il Ceco, e poi l’Angelo d’Oro, quello Nero e perfino una Lady Angel. Qui sotto, una foto dell’Angelo Svedese.

01

Nel frattempo, Tillet continuava a vincere e nei primi anni ’40 divenne uno dei wrestler di prima categoria, vincendo il titolo mondiale dei pesi massimi e restando imbattuto per 19 mesi consecutivi. Poi, lentamente, la sua gloria cominciò a declinare di pari passo con la sua salute, nonostante egli continuasse a lottare. Ma ormai non era più un campione: disputò il suo ultimo incontro nel febbraio del 1953.

shrek_03

Maurice with Two Gals

Maurice with one gal

Maurice in robe

Life Mag 1939 - 3 Maurice Tillet Life Mag 1939 - 4 Maurice Tillet Life Mag 1939 - 5 Maurice Tillet

Uno scompenso cardiovascolare mise fine alla sua vita, un anno dopo; ma non prima che uno scultore divenuto suo amico riuscisse ad eseguire dei calchi in gesso e a scolpire alcuni busti a grandezza naturale, uno dei quali è esposto al Museo Internazionale di Scienza Chirurgica di Chicago. L’anno scorso Maurice Tillet è stato introdotto nella Professional Wrestling Hall of Fame.

MatReview1

Maurice2

French Angel and Canadian writers l. to r. Ralph Allen, Johnny Fitzgerald, Joe Perlove, and Hal Walker.  Frank Tunney.

Oggi molti siti internet lo ricordano quasi esclusivamente per la diceria secondo cui gli artisti della Dreamworks si sarebbero ispirati ai suoi lineamenti per il personaggio cinematografico di Shrek – tralasciando di menzionare il vero esempio che Tillet ci lascia: quello di uno strano gigante gentile, un angelo che si disvelava soltanto a chi sapeva guardare oltre l’apparenza fisica. E, soprattutto, un uomo che aveva imparato l’essenza spirituale della lotta, che consiste nello sfruttare a proprio favore la forza dell’avversario. Tillet era riuscito, con determinazione, a trasformare un destino crudele nella migliore delle opportunità.

tilletsp

Ecco un sito inglese interamente dedicato a Maurice Tillet, contenente articoli e foto d’epoca.

(Grazie, Giulia!)

Adam Rainer

adamrainer (2)

Della sfortunata vita di Adam Rainer ci sono arrivati pochissimi dettagli biografici, eppure la sua storia è un caso davvero unico nei registri della medicina.
Nato in Austria nel 1899, a Graz, Adam non sembrava inizialmente differente da tutti gli altri bambini della sua età, nonostante fosse piuttosto minuto e gracile. D’altronde i genitori erano di statura normale: il padre era alto 1.75m e la madre 1.65m.

adamrainer (3)

Entrato nella fase dell’adolescenza, però, divenne presto evidente che la sua maturità fisica si sviluppava a rilento, e la sua statura rimaneva limitata. La corporatura fragile e debole lo escluse dal servizio di leva nel 1917 e nel 1918: durante gli esami medici, la sua statura venne accertata attorno a 1.38m (anche se le fonti sono discordanti al riguardo – c’è chi parla di 1.22m, chi addirittura di 1.18m). Quale che fosse l’altezza esatta, la diagnosi fu ufficialmente quella di nanismo, che normalmente si indica per stature inferiori a 1.45m. Eppure i medici notarono anche uno strano particolare: nonostante la piccola stazza Adam aveva dei piedi molto grandi (taglia 43).

adamrainer (4)
Non ci è dato di sapere se in questo periodo Adam sognasse di poter guadagnare ancora qualche centimetro, se rivolgesse al cielo qualche intima preghiera per avvicinarsi a una statura normale; ma certo non poteva immaginare che questa sua segreta speranza si sarebbe presto trasformata nel peggiore degli incubi.

A sorpresa, all’età di 21 anni, Adam ricominciò a crescere. Le sue mani e i suoi piedi raggiunsero proporzioni abnormi (il piede arrivò alla taglia 53 nel 1920), il suo volto cominciò a deformarsi e la sua schiena ad incurvarsi, sotto la spinta di questo nuovo e inarrestabile sviluppo.
Alla fine degli anni ’20 la vista di Adam cominciò a calare drasticamente, tanto che il suo occhio destro divenne quasi cieco. Anche l’udito si abbassò, rendendolo sordo dall’orecchio sinistro; camminare divenne difficoltoso a causa della curvatura della schiena. Quella crescita che durante l’adolescenza non era mai avvenuta, ora sembrava destinata a non fermarsi più.

adamrainer (1)
Tra il 25 agosto 1930 e il 23 maggio 1931 Adam Rainer venne esaminato da due dottori, Mandl e Windholz. La sua altezza era ormai di 2.16m, e Rainer mostrava chiari sintomi di acromegalia: mani e piedi enormi, fronte e mascella sporgenti, labbra ingrossate e denti grandi e distanti l’uno dall’altro. Durante gli esami, i due medici scoprirono che la causa di tutto ciò era un tumore alla ghiandola pituitaria (l’ipofisi): un cancro presente da ormai dieci anni, che aveva portato a una produzione eccessiva di ormone della crescita.

adamrainer
Il 2 dicembre 1930 Adam Rainer venne operato dal prof. Hirsch e qualche mese dopo l’operazione la sua altezza risultò invariata. Putroppo però l’inarcarsi della sua schiena era ulteriormente peggiorato: questo significava che l’operazione per fermare la sua crescita non era riuscita, e Adam stava ancora allungandosi inesorabilmente.

adamrainer (9)
Costretto a letto dalla sua malattia, Adam visse ancora 20 anni dopo l’operazione. Morì il 4 marzo 1950, dopo aver raggiunto un’altezza di 2.33m – o, secondo altre fonti, addirittura di 2.39m.

È ricordato negli annali medici (e nel Guinness dei Primati) come l’unico uomo ad essere stato sia un nano che un gigante.

adamrainer (6)

(Le foto e gran parte delle info provengono da The Tallest Man, sito interamente dedicato al gigantismo).

Il Gigante di Cardiff

In quel tempo c’erano sulla terra i giganti,
e ci furono anche di poi,
quando i figliuoli di Dio si accostarono
alle figliuole degli uomini,
e queste fecero loro de’ figliuoli.
(Genesi, 6:4)

Era il 1868. Il tabaccaio George Hull era ateo, e non sopportava quei cristiani fondamentalisti che prendevano la Bibbia alla lettera. Così, dopo un’ennesima discussione esasperante con un suo concittadino convinto che nelle Sacre Scritture non vi potesse essere alcuna metafora, Hull decise che si sarebbe preso gioco di tutti i creduloni, e forse ci avrebbe anche fatto qualche soldo. Si preparò quindi a mettere in piedi quella che sarebbe stata ricordata in seguito come la “più grande burla della storia americana”.

George Hull acquistò un terreno ricco di gesso nello Iowa, e fece estrarre un grosso blocco di pietra squadrata. Con enormi difficoltà, riuscì a far spostare l’ingombrante fardello fino alla ferrovia, dichiarando che serviva per un monumento commissionatogli a Washington. Ma il blocco di gesso venne invece spedito a Chicago, a casa di Edwin Burkhardt, uno scultore di lapidi e busti funerari. Hull l’aveva infatti convinto a lavorare in segreto, con la promessa di un lauto pagamento, alla scultura che aveva in mente. Lo stesso George Hull fece da modello per quella strana statua di quattro metri e mezzo, e quando l’opera fu completa i due passarono sul gesso acidi, mordenti e agenti macchianti per “invecchiare” la scultura. Riuscirono addirittura a ricreare quelli che avrebbero dovuto essere scambiati per i pori della pelle.

Hull tornò quindi con il suo “gigante” a New York, dove lo seppellì dietro il fienile del suo amico e complice William “Stub” Newell.  Lasciarono passare un anno e poi, con la scusa che serviva un nuovo pozzo, pagarono una ditta di scavi per cominciare i lavori. Gli operai, ovviamente ignari, scoprirono l’incredibile statua, e già il pomeriggio seguente Hull e Newell avevano eretto una tenda attorno alla “tomba del gigante pietrificato” e chiedevano ai visitatori 25 centesimi per poter ammirare quella meraviglia. Cominciò un immenso passaparola, e il prezzo di entrata raddoppiò in poco tempo a 50 centesimi – una cifra altissima per l’epoca.

Il gigante di Cardiff divenne l’argomento dell’anno: politici, accademici e religiosi ne discutevano con fervore, e le teorie più assurde vennero proposte per spiegare l’enigma. Secondo alcuni il gigante era un missionario gesuita del 1500, secondo altri un indiano irochese Onondaga, ma per la maggioranza, come aveva sperato Hull, il gigante era la dimostrazione inconfutabile che ciò che era scritto nella Bibbia non era soltanto una verità spirituale, ma anche storica. Nemmeno la lettera, proveniente da Chicago, di uno sconosciuto scultore tedesco che affermava di aver preso parte alla beffa, convinse nessuno: erano certamente i vaneggiamenti di un pazzo. Un geologo dichiarò: “il gigante ha il marchio del tempo stampato su ogni arto e fattezza, in un modo e con una precisione che nessun uomo può imitare”.

Il gigante di Cardiff, cominciato come un costoso ed elaborato scherzo, stava diventando un business enorme: venne spostato a Syracuse, dove il prezzo del biglietto salì fino a 1 dollaro – più o meno 60 euro di oggi.

E qui entra in scena il geniale P. T. Barnum. Come sempre, appena fiutava odore di affari, il più grande showman di tutta l’America non si faceva scrupoli. Barnum offrì a Hull 50.000$ per portare in tour il gigante per tre mesi, ma Hull rifiutò. Barnum però non era certo tipo da darsi per vinto: riuscì a corrompere una guardia, e di notte fece intrufolare nella tenda un suo artigiano, che eseguì un calco in cera del gigante. Tornato a New York, ricavò dal calco in cera una copia in gesso, del tutto identica alla statua di Hull, per esporla nel suo museo.

Adesso c’erano quindi in giro ben due giganti! Cominciò una battaglia tragicomica, senza esclusione di colpi. Barnum dichiarò che il suo gigante era l’originale, che aveva comprato da Hull, e che quello di Hull era un falso. Hull denunciò Barnum per diffamazione. In tribunale, Hull ammise che il gigante era una burla, e la corte decise che Barnum non poteva essere ritenuto colpevole di aver dichiarato che il gigante di Hull era un falso, dato che lo era. Durante la disputa, un collaboratore di Hull pronunciò la celebre frase There’s a sucker born every minute (“Ogni minuto nasce un nuovo babbeo”), che sarebbe poi stata erroneamente attribuita a Barnum, e che riassume perfettamente una certa filosofia dello show-business.

E infatti i “babbei” non si fecero attendere. Il processo, paradossalmente, riaccese la curiosità del pubblico per “la grande burla del gigante di Cardiff”, e la folla ricominciò a pagare per vedere non più uno, ma due giganti, che su strade separate continuarono la loro carriera per molti anni, fruttando una fortuna sia a Hull che a Barnum. Se vi interessa sono ancora visibili. L’originale è esposto al Farmer’s Museum a Cooperstown, New York, mentre è possibile ammirare la copia di Barnum al Marvin’s Marvelous Mechanical Museum di Detroit. Ed entrambi valgono il prezzo del biglietto… se siete dei babbei.

Il vostro prossimo cucciolo – VII

Sorprendete i vostri ospiti al prossimo pool-party!

Questo simpatico cucciolotto di salamandra gigante chiede soltanto un po’ di spazio, un po’ di pesci e crostacei da sbafarsi, e un po’ del vostro affetto.

Le salamandre giganti asiatiche (famiglia cryptobranchidae) possono vivere fino a 50 anni in cattività, quindi si tratta di un investimento a lungo termine.

La salamandra gigante giapponese arriva fino a un metro e mezzo di lunghezza, ma se proprio siete di quelli che vogliono tutto più grande degli altri, c’è sempre la varietà cinese, che arriva oltre i 180 cm di lunghezza, per 40 kg di peso. Ormai, però, le salamandre cinesi raramente raggiungono questa stazza.

E se un giorno al vostro cucciolo dovesse succedere qualcosa di brutto… be’, potete sempre chiamare gli amici a cena!

A parte gli scherzi, la salamandra gigante cinese è fra le specie più a rischio di estinzione: oltre alla scomparsa dell’habitat dovuta all’inquinamento, la situazione critica delle salamandre in Cina è da imputarsi proprio alla cucina e alla medicina tradizionale, che ne fanno ampiamente uso.