The wizard of soccer

But Nino don’t be afraid of missing a penalty kick
One does not become a good player
On the account of these details
You can tell a good player from his courage,
His selflessness, his creativity.

(F. De Gregori, La leva calcistica della classe ’68, 1982)

Carlos Henrique Raposo, a.k.a. “Kaiser”, active in the Eighties and Nineties, played in eleven soccer teams, such as Vasco da Gama, Flamengo, Fluminense and Botafogo in Brazil, Ajaccio in Corsica and Puebla in Messico.
Eleven professional clubs, and zero goals scored in his whole career.
Yes, because Carlos Henrique Raposo, a.k.a. “Kaiser”, pretended to be a player. And in reality he was an illusionist.

Born in 1963 in a poor family, as many other Brazilian kids Carlos dreamed of a redemption made of luxury and success. He had tried to become a soccer player, without any major result: yet he had the right muscular and powerful build, so much so that he was often mistaken for a professional soccer player. Around his twenties, Carlos clearly understood his mission: “I wanted to be a player, without having to play“.
Therefore, he decided to trust his courage, selflessness and creativity.

Courage
Carlos “Kaiser” certainly had the nerve. As a nightlife aficionado and regular clubber in Rio, he managed to bond with a series of famous soccer players (Romário, Edmundo, Bebeto, Renato Gaúcho and Ricardo Rocha who later called him “the greatest conman in Brazilian football“); he offered his favors and used his connections to organize parties and meetings. In return, he began asking to be included as a makeweight in his friends’ transfer deals.
It’s importanto to keep in mind that in the mid-Eighties the internet did not exist, and it was quite difficult to find information on a new player: Carlos was enthusiastically presented by great players vouching for him, who granted him with his first professional contract (for a three-month trial) in the Botafogo club. And thus began his career, always behind the front line but nonetheless enjoying relatively high wages, and an incredible fiction which lasted more than twenty years.

kaiser-renatogaucho-pauloroberto

Selflessness
First of all, it was essential for Carlos to earn his teammates’ unconditional trust, their cover and benevolence.
As soon as I knew which hotel we would be staying in, I went there two or three days beforehand. I rented rooms for ten ladies in that hotel, so that instead of sneaking away at night, my teammates and I could simply walk down the stairs to have some fun“.
Another important step was ensuring to have some newspaper article backing up his non-existing talents. Again, that was not a problem for the “Kaiser”, thanks to his socialite connections: “I have an incredible aptitude for making friends with people. I knew several journalists very well at the time, and treated them all kindly. A little gift, some insider information could come in handy, and in return they wrote about the ‘great soccer player’ “.

Creativity
Once he obtained a contract, leaning on other players’ transfer negotiations, the second part of Carlos’ plan kicked off: how could he manage to remain in the team without the coach realizing that he wasn’t even able to kick a ball? The solution Carlos came up with was simple yet brilliant – he had to gain as much time as possible.
He started by saying he was out of shape, and that he needed to follow a special workout program with a mysterious personal trainer. He then spent the first two or three weeks running along the sidelines, without participating in the team’s exercises. After that, when he could no longer postpone his presence in the field, he asked a teammate to make an irregular entrance on him during a training game and to inflict him a (not too serious) injury. Sometimes he didn’t even need outside help, he just pretended to sprain his muscle, an injury which was difficult to verify in those years: “I preformed some strange moves during the training, I touched my muscle and then stayed in the infirmary for 20 days or so. There was no MRI at the time. Days went by, but I had a dentist friend who certified I had physical health problems. And so, months went by…
In this way, scoring zero minutes of playing time during each season, he jumped from team to team. “I always signed the Risk Contract, the shortest one, normally for a six-month period. I received the bonus, and went straight to infirmary“. To enhance his great player image, he often showed up talking in English through a huge cellular phone (a true status symbol, back then), presumably to some foreign manager offering him some outstanding deal. Unfortunately his broken English conversations made no sense whatsoever, and his cellphone was in fact a toy phone.

When he went back to Brazil, in the Bangu team, Carlos’ hoax almost collapsed. The coach, taking him by surprise, decided to summon him for the sunday match and around the half of the second time he told him to warm up. Given the dangerous situation, and the forthcoming disaster a debut would entail, Carlos reacted with an exceptional stunt: all of a sudden, he started a fight with an opposing team’s supporter. He got immediately expelled from the game. When in the locker room the coach furiously approached him, he pretended like he acted on behalf of the coach himself: “God gave me a father and then took him away from me. Now that God has given me a second father, I can’t allow anyone to insult him“. The incident ended with the coach kissing him on his forehead, and renewing his contract.
He had another stroke of genius at the time of his debut in the Ajaccio club, in Corsica, France. The new Brazilian soccer player was greeted by the supporters with unexpected enthusiasm: “the stadium was small, but crowded with people, everywhere I looked. I thought I just had to show up and cheer, but then I saw many balls on the field and I understood we would be training. I was nervous, they would realize I was not able to play on my first day”. So Carlos decided to play the last trump, trying yet another one of his tricks. He entered the playing field, and began kicking each and every ball, sending them over to the gallery, waving his hand and kissing his shirt. The supporters went into raptures, and of course never threw back the precious balls, which had been touched by the publicised champion’s foot. Once out of balls, the team had to engage in a strictly physical training, which Carlos could manage to do without problem.

Reality and lies
After leaving Guarany, aged 39, Carlos Henrique Raposo retired having played approximately 20 games – all of which ended with an injury – in approximately 20 years of professional career (the numbers are a little hazy). But he came away with a wonderful story to tell.
And here’s the only problem: practically every major anecdote about this intentionally misleading stunt comes from no other than Kaiser himself. Sure enough, his colleagues confirm the image of a young man who made up for his lack of ability with immense self-assurance and cockiness: “he is a great friend, an exquisite person. Too bad that he doesn’t even know how to play cards. He had a problem with the ball, I did not see him play in any team, ever. He told you stories about games and matches, but he never played even on Sunday afternoon in Maracanà, I can tell you that! In a lying contest against Pinocchio, Kaiser would win“, Richardo Rocha declared.
So, why should we believe this Pinocchio when he comes out of nowhere and tell us his “truth”?

Maybe because it feels good to do so. Maybe because the story of a “man without qualities”, a Mr. Nobody who pretends to be a champion, cheating big soccer corporations (which are frequently nowadays amid market scandals) is some kind of a revenge by proxy, that has many soccer aficionados grinning. Maybe because his incredible story, on a human level, could come straight out of a movie.

In the meantime, Carlos shows absolutely no regrets: “if I had been more dedicated, I could have gone further in the game“.
Not in the soccer game, of course, but in his game of illusion.

Il Turco

Nel 1770, alla corte di Maria Teresa d’Austria, fece la sua prima sconcertante apparizione il Turco.

Vestito come uno stregone mediorientale, con tanto di vistoso turbante, il Turco sedeva ad un grosso tavolo di fronte a una scacchiera, e fumava una lunghissima pipa tradizionale; da sopra la barba nerissima, i suoi occhi grigi, ancorché vuoti e privi d’espressione, sembravano osservare tutto e tutti.  Il Turco era in attesa del coraggioso giocatore che avrebbe osato sfidarlo a scacchi.

Turk-engraving5

Tuerkischer_schachspieler_windisch4

Ciò che davvero impressionò tutti i presenti era che il Turco non era un uomo in carne ed ossa: era un automa. Il suo inventore, Wolfgang von Kempelen, lo aveva creato proprio per compiacere la Regina, con la quale si era vantato l’anno prima di essere in grado di costruire la macchina più spettacolare del mondo. Prima che cominciasse la partita a scacchi, Kempelen aprì le ante dell’enorme scatola sulla quale poggiava la scacchiera, e gli spettatori poterono vedere una intricatissima serie di meccanismi, ruote dentate e strane strutture ad orologeria – non c’era nessun trucco, si poteva vedere da una parte all’altra della struttura, quando Kempelen apriva anche le porte sul retro. Un’altra sezione della macchina era invece quasi vuota, a parte una serie di tubi d’ottone. Quando il Turco era messo in moto, si sentiva chiaramente il ritmico sferragliare dei suoi ingranaggi interni, simile al ticchettio che avrebbe prodotto un enorme orologio.

Il primo volontario si fece avanti e Kempelen lo informò che il Turco doveva avere sempre le pedine bianche, e muovere invariabilmente per primo. A parte questa “concessione”, si scoprì ben presto che il Turco non soltanto era un ottimo giocatore di scacchi, ma aveva anche un certo caratterino. Se un avversario tentava una mossa non valida, il Turco scuoteva la testa, rimetteva la pedina al suo posto e si arrogava il diritto di muovere; se il giocatore ci riprovava una seconda volta, l’automa gettava via la pedina.

arab1
Alla sua presentazione ufficiale a corte, il Turco sbaragliò facilmente qualsiasi avversario. Per Kempelen sarebbe anche potuta finire lì, con il bel successo del suo spettacolo. Ma il suo automa divenne di colpo l’argomento di conversazione preferito in tutta Europa: intellettuali, nobili e curiosi volevano confrontarsi con questa incredibile macchina in grado di pensare, altri sospettavano un trucco, e alcuni temevano si trattasse di magia nera (pochi per la verità, era pur sempre l’epoca dei Lumi). Nonostante volesse dedicarsi a nuove invenzioni, di fronte all’ordine dell’Imperatore Giuseppe II, Kempelen fu costretto controvoglia a rimontare il suo automa e ad esibirsi nuovamente a corte; il successo fu ancora più clamoroso, e all’inventore venne suggerito (o, per meglio dire, imposto) di iniziare un tour europeo.

Kempelen-charcoal

Nel 1783 il Turco viaggiò fra spettacoli pubblici e privati, presso le principali corti europee e nei saloni nobiliari, perdendo alcune partite ma vincendone la maggior parte. A Parigi il più grande scacchista del tempo, François-André Danican Philidor, vinse contro il Turco ma confessò che quella era stata la partita più faticosa della sua carriera. Dopo Parigi vennero Londra, Leipzig, Dresda, Amsterdam, Vienna. A poco a poco si spense il clamore della novità, e il Turco rimase smantellato per una ventina d’anni: nessuno aveva ancora scoperto il suo segreto. Quando Kempelen morì nel 1804, suo figlio decise di vendere il macchinario a Johann Nepomuk Mälzel, un appassionato collezionista di automi. Mälzel decise che avrebbe dato nuova vita al Turco, perfezionandolo e rendendolo ancora più spettacolare. Aggiunse alcune parti, modificò alcuni dettagli, e infine installò una scatola parlante che permetteva alla macchina di pronunciare la parola “échec!” quando metteva sotto scacco l’avversario.

1-0.The_Turk.Granger_Collection_0059574_H.L02645400
Perfino Napoleone Bonaparte volle giocare contro il Turco. Si racconta che l’Imperatore provò una mossa illecita per ben tre volte; le prime due volte l’automa scosse il capo e rimise la pedina al suo posto, ma la terza volta perse le staffe e con un braccio – evidentemente incurante di chi aveva di fronte! – il Turco spazzò via tutti pezzi dalla scacchiera. Napoleone rimase estremamente divertito dal gesto insolente, e giocò in seguito alcune partite più “serie”.

Malzels-exhibition-ad
Nel 1826 Mälzel portò il Turco in America, dove la sua popolarità non smise di crescere su tutta la costa orientale degli States, da New York a Boston a Philadelphia; Edgar Allan Poe scrisse un famoso trattato sull’automa (anche se non azzeccò affatto il suo segreto), e numerosi “cloni” ed imitazioni del Turco cominciarono ad apparire – ma nessuno ebbe il successo dell’originale.

Ma ogni cosa fa il suo tempo. Nel 1838 Mälzel morì, e il Turco, inizialmente messo all’asta, finì relegato in un angolo del Peale Museum di Baltimora. Nel 1854 un incendio raggiunse il Museo, e ci fu chi giurò di aver sentito il Turco, avvolto dalle fiamme, che gridava “Scacco! Scacco!“, mentre la sua voce diveniva sempre più flebile. Dell’incredibile automa si salvò soltanto la scacchiera, che era conservata in un luogo separato.

Nel 1857 Silas Mitchell, figlio dell’ultimo proprietario del Turco, decise che non c’era più motivo di nascondere il vero funzionamento della macchina, visto che era andata ormai distrutta. Così, su una prestigiosa rivista di scacchi, pubblicò infine il “segreto meglio mantenuto di sempre”. Si scoprì che, fra le ipotesi degli scettici e le teorie di chi aveva tentato di risolvere l’enigma, alcune parti dell’ingegnosa opera erano state indovinate, ma mai interamente.

turk-hidden-1-4
Dentro al macchinario del Turco si nascondeva un maestro di scacchi in carne ed ossa. Quando il presentatore apriva i diversi scomparti per mostrarli al pubblico, l’operatore segreto si spostava su un sedile mobile, secondo uno schema preciso, facendo così scivolare in posizione alcune parti semoventi del macchinario. In questo modo, poiché non tutte le ante venivano aperte contemporaneamente, lo scacchista rimaneva sempre al riparo dagli occhi degli spettatori. Ma come poteva sapere in che modo giocare la sua partita?

Sotto ogni pezzo degli scacchi era impiantato un forte magnete, e l’operatore nascosto poteva seguire le mosse dell’avversario perché la calamita attirava a sé altrettanti magneti attaccati con un filo all’interno del coperchio superiore della scatola. L’operatore, per vedere nel buio del mobile in legno, usava una candela i cui fumi uscivano discretamente da un condotto di aerazione nascosto nel turbante del Turco; i numerosi candelabri che illuminavano la scena aiutavano a mascherare la fuoriuscita del fumo. Una complessa serie di leve simili a quelle di un pantografo permettevano al maestro di scacchi di fare la sua mossa, muovendo il braccio dell’automa. C’era perfino un quadrante in ottone con una serie di numeri, che poteva essere visto anche dall’esterno: questo permetteva la comunicazione in codice fra l’operatore all’interno della scatola e il presentatore all’esterno.

KONICA MINOLTA DIGITAL CAMERA

1041323440_a377ac2955
Nel 1989 John Gaughan presentò a una conferenza sulla magia una perfetta ricostruzione del Turco, che gli era costata quattro anni di lavoro. Questa volta, però, non c’era più bisogno di un operatore umano all’interno del macchinario: a dirigere le mosse dell’automa era un programma computerizzato. Meno di dieci anni dopo Deep Blue sarebbe stato il primo computer a battere a scacchi il campione mondiale in carica, Garry Kasparov.

Oggi la tecnologia è arrivata ben oltre le più assurde fantasie di chi rimaneva sconcertato di fronte al Turco; eppure alcune delle domande che ci sono tanto familiari (potranno mai le macchine soppiantare gli uomini? È possibile costruire dei sistemi meccanici capaci di pensiero?) non sono poi così moderne come potremmo credere: nacquero per la prima volta proprio attorno a questa misteriosa e ironica figura dall’esotico turbante.

turk-chess-automaton-01-x640
(Grazie, Giulia!)