Lanterns of the Dead

lanterne-des-morts-antigny

In several medieval cemeteries of west-central France stand some strange masonry buildings, of varying height, resembling small towers. The inside, bare and hollow, was sufficiently large for a man to climb to the top of the structure and light a lantern there, at sundawn.
But what purpose did these bizarre lighthouses serve? Why signal the presence of a graveyard to wayfarers in the middle of the night?

The “lanterns of the dead”, built between the XII and XIII Century, represent a still not fully explained historical enigma.

Lanterne-Ciron-1

Lanterne-des-morts-moutiers-en-retz-0004

Saint-Goussaud_(Creuse,_fr)_lanterne_des_morts

Part of the problem comes from the fact that in medieval literature there seems to be no allusion to these lamps: the only coeval source is a passage in the De miraculis by Peter the Venerable (1092-1156). In one of his accounts of miraculous events, the famous abbot of Cluny mentions the Charlieu lantern, which he had certainly seen during his voyages in Aquitaine:

There is, at the center of the cemetery, a stone structure, on top of which is a place that can house a lamp, its light brightening this sacred place every night  as a sign of respect for the the faithful who are resting here. There also are some small steps leading to a platform which can be sufficient for two or three men, standing or seated.

This bare description is the only one dating back to the XII Century, the exact period when most of these lanterns are supposed to have been built. This passage doesn’t seem to say much in itself, at least at first sight; but we will return to it, and to the surprises it hides.
As one might expect, given the literary silence surrounding these buildings, a whole array of implausible conjectures have been proposed, multiplying the alleged “mysteries” rather than explaining them — everything from studies of the towers’ geographical disposition, supposed to reveal hidden, exoteric geometries, to the decyphering of numerological correlations, for instance between the 11 pillars on Fenioux lantern’s shaft and the 13 small columns on its pinnacle… and so on. (Incidentally, these full gallop speculations call to mind the classic escalation brilliantly exemplified by Mariano Tomatis in his short documentary A neglected shadow).

lanterne

A more serious debate among historians, beginning in the second half of XIX Century, was intially dominated by two theories, both of which appear fragile to a more modern analysis: on one hand the idea that these towers had a celtic origin (proposed by Viollet-Le-Duc who tried to link them back to menhirs) and, on the other, the hypothesis of an oriental influence on the buildings. But historians have already discarded the thesis that a memory of the minarets or of the torch allegedly burning on Saladin‘s grave, seen during the Crusades, might have anything to do with the lanterns of the dead.

Without resorting to exotic or esoteric readings, is it then possible to interpret the lanterns’ meaning and purpose by placing them in the medieval culture of which they are an expression?
To this end, historian Cécile Treffort has analysed the polysemy of the light in the Christian tradition, and its correlations with Candlemas — or Easter — candles, and with the lantern (Les lanternes des morts: une lumière protectrice?, Cahiers de recherches médiévales, n.8, 2001).

Since the very first verses of Genesis, the divine light (lux divina) counterposes darkness, and it is presented as a symbol of wisdom leading to God: believers must shun obscurity and follow the light of the Lord which, not by chance, is awaiting them even beyond death, in a bright afterworld permeated by lux perpetua, a heavenly kingdom where prophecies claim the sun will never set. Even Christ, furthermore, affirms “I am the light of the world. Whoever follows me will never walk in darkness, but will have the light of life” (Jn 8:12).
The absence of light, on the contrary, ratifies the dominion of demons, temptations, evil spirits — it is the kingdom of the one who once carried the flame, but was discharged (Lucifer).

In the Middle Ages, tales of demonic apparitions and dangerous revenants taking place inside cemeteries were quite widespread, and probably the act of lighting a lantern had first and foremost the function of protecting the place from the clutches of infernal beings.

Lanterne_des_morts-Saint-Pierre-d'Oléron

Cherveix-Cubas_lanterne_des_morts_(10)

But the lantern symbology is not limited to its apotropaic function, because it also refers to the Parable of the Ten Virgins found in Matthew’s gospel: here, to keep the flame burning while waiting for the bridegroom is a metaphor for being vigilant and ready for the Redeemer’s arrival. At the time of his coming, we shall see who maintained their lamps lit — and their souls pure — and who foolishly let them go out.

The Benedictine rule prescribed that a candle had to be kept always lit in the convent’s dorms, because the “sons of light” needed to stay clear of darkness even on a bodily level.
If we keep in mind that the word cemetery etymologically means “dormitory”, lighting up a lantern inside a graveyard might have fulfilled several purposes. It was meant to bring light in the intermediary place par excellence, situated between the church and the secular land, between liturgy and temptation, between life and death, a permeable boundary through which souls could still come back or be lost to demons; it was believed to protect the dead, both physically and spiritually; and, furthermore, to symbolically depict the escatological expectation, the constant watch for the Redeemer.

Lanterne_des_Morts_Sarlat

One last question is left, to which the answer can be quite surprising.
The theological meaning of the lanterns of the dead, as we have seen, is rich and multi-faceted. Why then did Peter the Venerable only mention them so briefly and in an almost disinterested way?

This problem opens a window on a little known aspect of ecclesiastical history: the graveyard as a political battleground.
Starting from the X Century, the Church began to “appropriate” burial grounds ever more jealously, laying claim to their management. This movement (anticipating and preparing for the introduction of Purgatory, of which I have written in my De Profundis) had the effect of making the ecclesiastical authority an undisputed judge of memory — deciding who had, or had not, the right to be buried under the aegis of the Holy Church. Excommunication, which already was a terrible weapon against heretics who were still alive, gained the power of cursing them even after their death. And we should not forget that the cemetery, besides this political control, also offered a juridical refuge as a place of inviolable asylum.

Peter the Venerable found himself in the middle of a schism, initiated by Antipope Anacletus, and his voyages in Aquitaine had the purpose of trying to solve the difficult relationship with insurgent Benedictine monasteries. The lanterns of the dead were used in this very region of France, and upon seeing them Peter must have been fascinated by their symbolic depth. But they posed a problem: they could be seen as an alternative to the cemetery consecration, a practice the Cluny Abbey was promoting in those years to create an inviolable space under the exclusive administration of the Church.
Therefore, in his tale, he decided to place the lantern tower in Charlieu — a priorate loyal to his Abbey — without even remotely suggesting that the authorship of the building’s concept actually came from the rival Aquitaine.

43815703

Cellefrouin, lanterne des morts

This copyright war, long before the term was invented, reminds us that the cemetery, far from being a simple burial ground, was indeed a politically strategic liminal territory. Because holding the symbolic dominion over death and the afterworld historically proved to be often more relevant than any temporal power.

Although these quarrels have long been returned to dust, many towers still exist in French cemeteries. Upright against the tombs and the horizontal remains waiting to be roused from sleep, devoid of their lanterns for centuries now, they stand as silent witnesses of a time when the flame from a lamp could offer protection and hope both to the dead and the living.

(Thanks, Marco!)

Ischia’s creative graves

Art, construction and redemption

Post and pictures by our guestblogger Mario Trani

The island of Ischia, pearl of the Neapolitan Gulf, holds a secret.
It’s a sort of exaltation, a deviant behavior caused by the very limited living space or maybe by an instinctive desire of marking the territory: it’s the plague of frauca — the unauthorized construction, in infringement of all local building regulations.

The Ischian resident, in order to be (or to think of himself as) respected, has to build, construct, erect.
It might be just a screed, a dry stone wall, a second floor or a small living quarter for his son who’s about to get married. All rigorously unauthorized, these supplements to the house are built in disregard of those strict and suffocating rules he feels are killing his creativity; and which often force him to demolish what he so patiently constructed.

No family is without an expert in this field, and often more than one member is mastro fraucatore or mezza cucchiara (nicknames for a master builder).
But the free zone, the real no man’s land where all the islanders’ construction dreams come true is the graveyard.

To walk through the avenues of the Ischia Municipal Cemetery means to discover surprising tombs the relatives of the deceased decorated with materials found around the island: lava stones from the volcanic Mount Epomeo, polished rocks from the many beaches, sea shells and scallops; stones from the Olmitello creek or pizzi bianchi of carsic origin.

conchiglie della mandra

tronco d'albero tagliato nella sua sede originale come verticale della croce

pietre levigate del bagnasciuga

pietre bianche dei pizzi bianchi

conchiglie e pietre levigate del bagnasciuga

pietra lavica del monte epomeo2

pietre levigate del torrente olmitello

Other tombs incorporate remainings and leftovers from unauthorized constructions, such as unused bricks or decorated floor tiles.

materiali vari-- (1)

materiali vari-

spezzoni di piastrelle

porfido da giardino

materiali vari

piastrelle3

mosaici da piastrelle

mattoni

No grave is similar to another, in this array of different materials and colors. But there is a specific niche of funeral art, reserved to those who worked as fishermen.
To honor the deceased who, during their lifetime, bravely defied the sea for the catch of the day, granting the survival and well-being of their family, a peculiar grave is built in the shape of a gozzo, the typical Ischian fishing boat.

gozzi1

Gozzi3

Gozzi2

Gozzi4

Gozzi5

This is a touching way of saying a last goodbye, and looking at these hand-crafted graves one cannot help but appreciate the genuine creativity of these artisans. But the tombs seem to be the ultimate, ironic redemption of the heirs of Typhon: a payback for that building urge, that longing for cement and concrete which was constantly repressed during their lifetime.

modernismo (1)

The last embrace

They found among all those hideous carcasses two skeletons, one of which held the other in its embrace. One of these skeletons, which was that of a woman, still had a few strips of a garment which had once been white, and around her neck was to be seen a string of adrézarach beads with a little silk bag ornamented with green glass, which was open and empty. These objects were of so little value that the executioner had probably not cared for them. The other, which held this one in a close embrace, was the skeleton of a man. It was noticed that his spinal column was crooked, his head seated on his shoulder blades, and that one leg was shorter than the other. Moreover, there was no fracture of the vertebrae at the nape of the neck, and it was evident that he had not been hanged. Hence, the man to whom it had belonged had come thither and had died there. When they tried to detach the skeleton which he held in his embrace, he fell to dust.

(V. Hugo, Notre-Dame de Paris, 1831)

Thus, with Quasimodo holding his Esmeralda for eternity, ends Notre-Dame de Paris (1831) by Victor Hugo.

There is something awfully sad yet sublime in the image of two skeletons fixed in a last embrace: two lovers giving shelter to each other as the definitive cold makes its way, seemingly embodying the romantic ideal of love conquering death. “When you die, you always die alone“, sang Fabrizio De André; and yet, these remains seem to have experienced an enviable departure, as it grants the privilege of an extreme and intimate moment of inner thoughtfulness.

Earlier this year, in Greece, on the Diros archeological excavation site, two hugging skeletons were found: a man reclined behind a woman. These remains date back to 3.800 B.C., but even if “double” burials are quite rare, the one in Diros is actually not the only nor the most ancient one.

At the Archeological Museum in Mantua you can admire the so-called Lovers of Valdaro. The datation is neolithic, around 6.000 years ago. Their fetal position is typical of his kind of burials, but the two were layed down together.

Mantua2

And yet Mantua’s record of the “World’s most ancient lovers” is defied by the skeletons found in 2007 in the Turkish region of Diyarbakir, dating back to 8.000 years ago. They too are suspended in this final embrace for which we might never know the actual reason, as their love story flourished and ended before recorded History.

Once again in Greece, in the region of Agios Vasileios, a few kilometers south of Sparta, two skeletons came to light in a similar position, and they date back to 1.600-1.5000 B.C.: these two lovers are laying on their side, and the man’s hand sustains the woman’s head in a delicate gesture, unaltered after more than three millennia.

Among the 600 tombs excavated in the Syberian village of Staryi Tartas and dating back to the Andronovo Culture, some dozens feature double burials, or even family burials. The archeologists can only guess the origin these graves: are these traces of sacrificial rites, or were these collective graves meant for the souls to travel together to the afterlife?

siberia2

siberia3

siberia4

In the archeological site of Teppe Hasanlu, Iran, two other lovers were found lying face to face inside a brick bin. Researchers believe the two hid inside that bin to escape the ancient citadel’s destruction, occured at the end of IX Century B.C.; as they conforted each other, amidst the cries of massacre, they probably died by asphyxiation.

Lovers clinged to one another even during another kind of destruction: the terrible eruption of Pompeii in 79.B.C. sealed under the ashes some couples in the act of protecting each other.

The “lovers of Modena”, located some years ago while building an apartment block, date back to V-VI Century A.D. The two are holding hands, and the woman looks towards the man; it is believed that he was staring back at her, until the cushion under his head deteriorated, misplacing the skull.

More recent, but certainly not less striking, are the skeletons found in Cluji-Napoca, Romania. The man and woman, who lived between 1.400 and 1.550, were buried fcing each other, holding hands. According to the first reconstructions, it seems the man might have died in an accident or a violent fight (his sternum was fractured by a blunt objet), while the woman might have died of a broken heart.

We would like to end with the most touching, and recent, example. In Roermond, Netherlands, there are two really exceptional graves: those of Infantry Colonel J.W.C. van Gorcum and his wife J.C.P.H van Aefferden. Married in 1842, they stayed together for 38 years, until in 1880 the Colonel died, and was buried in the protestant lot of the town cemetery. His wife, who was catholic, knew she could not be buried beside him; she decreeted that her remains were not to be interred in her family tomb, but as close as possible to her husband’s – just on the other side of the wall dividing the prostestant section from the catholic one.

Since she died, in 1888, the two monuments have been holding hands, over the barrier which tried to keep them separate, in vain.

Bizzarro Bazar a Parigi – III

Eccoci al nostro terzo ed ultimo appuntamento con la Parigi più insolita e curiosa.

Quando ci troviamo nel cuore di una metropoli, tutto ci aspetteremmo tranne che poter osservare… gli animali selvaggi nel proprio habitat. Eppure, nel centralissimo quartiere di Les Halles a pochi passi del Centre Pompidou, esiste un luogo davvero unico: il Museo della Caccia e della Natura.

Prima di approfondire le implicazioni filosofiche ed artistiche di questa stupefacente istituzione, lasciatevi raccontare quello che attende il visitatore che decida di varcare la soglia del Museo.
Mentre ci si avventura nella luce soffusa della prima stanza, gli arazzi alle pareti, le ricercate poltrone antiche e i raffinati mobili d’ebano intarsiati di splendide fantasie in avorio danno l’impressione di essere appena entrati in un’abitazione privata di un ricco collezionista dell’800. Eppure, a sorpresa, ecco un cinghiale proprio nel bel mezzo di questo nobile salotto – l’animale ci fissa, la sua enorme massa scura è minacciosa ed imponente. Chiaramente si tratta di un esemplare tassidermico, ma il contrasto con l’ambiente circostante è spiazzante.
Lì vicino si può notare un armadio diverso dagli altri: è il pannello dedicato proprio al cinghiale. I cassetti e le ante di questo particolare mobiletto si possono aprire liberamente: facendo scivolare un largo e basso cassetto, ecco una ricostruzione del terreno del sottobosco – in cui all’inizio si stenta a scorgere alcunché se non del fango e delle foglie secche, ma ecco, guardando meglio si possono distinguere le impronte lasciate dal passaggio degli zoccoli del cinghiale. E’ la pista che dovremmo saper riconoscere e seguire se volessimo dare la caccia a questa difficile preda. In un altro cassettino, ecco una riproduzione degli escrementi della bestia.

chasse 8

chasse 5

chasse 4

chasse 3

chasse 2

chasse 1

Vi è anche una specie di binocolo integrato all’interno del legno dell’armadio. Accostando gli occhi, vediamo un paesaggio naturale in tre dimensioni. Sembra tutto piuttosto statico, i rami ondeggiano un poco e le acque di un lago si increspano, finché, con un po’ di pazienza, scorgiamo qualcosa che si muove in lontananza, fra le foglie… che sia proprio un cinghiale?

chasse 14

Lasciata la stanza del cinghiale, si entra in quella del cervo, e lo strano senso di spaesamento si rinnova.
A parte le due bellissime plancie esplicative ai lati del mobile, marchiate a fuoco nel legno, che raccontano le abitudini e le caratteristiche dell’animale, non vi è traccia delle classiche e pedisseque targhette da museo. Alcune sottili associazioni sono liberamente lasciate alla sensibilità del visitatore, come ad esempio quando a due passi dal teschio del cervo s’incontra una statua che rappresenta un satiro: molti passeranno oltre, senza accorgersi che le corna della statua antica sono perfettamente somiglianti a quelle del cervo… ma quando nella mente dell’osservatore prende forma questa analogia, ecco che senza bisogno di tante parole quella stanza svela l’importanza fondamentale dell’animale (il cervo, in questo caso) nell’immaginario umano. E mano a mano che ci si aggira per le sale, risulta sempre più evidente che, più che un Museo della Caccia, questo luogo è un tributo al complesso e stratificato rapporto fra esseri umani ed animali, e a come esso sia mutato nel corso dei millenni.

chasse 18

chasse 7

chasse 12

chasse 9

chasse 11

chasse 15

chasse 16

chasse 17

Nelle altre stanze si possono trovare opere d’arte e installazioni moderne proposte di fianco a carabine d’epoca, saloni che esplorano la tradizione venatoria del trofeo (rappresentazione ed esposizione della gloria del massacro, inquietante ed infantile al tempo stesso), teche piene di maschere di carnevale dalle fattezze animalesche che dimostrano come, a livello simbolico, la bestia sia radicata nel nostro inconscio – tanto da spingerci a dare vita anche ad animali e chimere di fantasia, di cui facciamo la conoscenza nello splendido gabinetto dell’unicorno.

chasse 38

chasse 37

chasse 40

chasse 34

chasse 35

chasse 45

chasse 46

chasse 50

chasse 49

chasse 47

chasse 25

chasse 19

chasse 20

chasse 21

chasse 23

Ma qual è la storia dietro a questo eccentrico museo? La fondazione si deve a François Sommer e a sua moglie Jacqueline: ricco collezionista e appassionato cacciatore, Sommer fu tra i primi a sostenere attivamente la necessità di una caccia etica, rispettosa dell’equilibrio naturale. Il cinghiale e il cervo, in via di estinzione, ritornarono a popolare le foreste francesi proprio grazie a Sommer e alle sue tenute, in cui voleva che gli animali selvaggi potessero moltiplicarsi al riparo dalla venagione indiscriminata.

chasse 32

chasse 33

chasse 56

chasse 53

chasse 57

chasse 58

chasse 59

chasse 60

Eppure, per quanto rispettoso e appassionato naturalista, egli era pur sempre un amante della caccia: da qui l’idea di un museo che mostrasse quanto questa attività avesse contribuito alla civilizzazione, e che allo stesso tempo esplorasse la nostra percezione degli animali e come si è radicalmente evoluta dalla preistoria ai giorni nostri.

chasse 61

chasse 62

chasse 67

chasse 68

chasse 69

chasse 70

Oggi che è venuto a mancare il suo fine sostentativo, rifiutiamo la caccia come superflua e crudele (affidandoci per l’approvvigionamento di carne ad altri metodi, bisogna vedere se meno crudeli), e consideriamo gli animali come vittime: ma un tempo il cinghiale, ad esempio, era un fiero e pericolosissimo avversario, capace di sbudellare il cacciatore con le sue zanne in pochi minuti. Esisteva dunque un naturale rispetto per l’animale che si è venuto a modificare.
Nel nostro Occidente ipertecnologico ed industrializzato, la caccia sta progressivamente perdendo ogni motivo di esistere; questo non cancella però il peso fondamentale che questa attività ha rivestito nei secoli. La storia della caccia, in fondo, è la storia del faticoso tentativo dell’uomo di prevalere nella gerarchia naturale, ma anche la storia delle nostre paure più ancestrali, dei nostri sogni, dei nostri miti.

chasse 72

chasse 73

Per approfondire e completare questa riflessione sui rapporti fra esseri umani e animali, ci rechiamo nuovamente nella banlieue, questa volta a nord-ovest di Parigi sulla rive gauche, ad Asnières-sur-Seine. Qui si trova il Cimitero dei Cani che, nonostante il nome, ospita anche molte altre specie di animali da compagnia.

chiens 1

Ufficialmente aperto alla fine dell’estate del 1899, il cimitero rispecchia il trasformarsi della funzione dell’animale (da utilitario ad animale di compagnia) avvenuta nel corso del XIX° Secolo. Se in quegli ultimi decenni le condizioni di vita degli “amici a quattro zampe” erano infatti migliorate, si avvertiva l’esigenza di una sistemazione più consona anche per le spoglie degli animali deceduti, e che fino a quel momento venivano squartati, o abbandonati nell’immondizia, o gettati nella Senna.

chiens 23

chiens 54

Nonostante alcune croniche difficoltà che continueranno, nel corso del secolo successivo, ad affliggerlo, il Cimitero dei Cani conoscerà un successo crescente, popolandosi di monumenti e sepolture sempre più prestigiose. Nel 1900 ad esempio viene eretto all’entrata del cimitero un monumento alla memoria di Barry, un San Bernardo che all’inizio del secolo precedente aveva “salvato la vita a 40 persone, restando ucciso dalla 41ma!”; a quanto pare, cioè, il coraggioso cane morì stremato da quest’ultimo sforzo. Alla sua morte, il suo corpo venne imbalsamato e conservato presso il Museo di storia naturale di Berna.
Un’altra tomba commemora un cane randagio che il 15 maggio del 1958 venne a morire proprio alle porte del cimitero: casualità straordinaria, si trattava del quarantamillesimo animale ad essere seppellito lì.

chiens 2

chiens 5

chiens 56

Ma qui, tutte le tombe raccontano delle storie di affetto e di amore fra persone ed animali, legami forti che apparentemente nulla hanno da invidiare a quelli fra esseri umani. Alcune iscrizioni sono davvero toccanti: “Figlia mia / Amore della mia vita / Ti amo / Tua mamma“, recita la tomba di Caramel. Sulla lapide della scimmietta Kiki è iscritto il verso “Dormi mia cara / fosti la gioia della mia vita“. Il proprietario del barboncino Youpi, morto nel 2001, scrive: “Il tuo immenso affetto ha illuminato la mia vita, sono talmente triste senza di te e il tuo meraviglioso sguardo“. E ancora: “In memoria della mia cara Emma, dal 12 Aprile 1889 al 2 Agosto 1900 fedele compagna e sola amica della mia vita errante e desolata“.

chiens 10

chiens 17

chiens 51

chiens 29

chiens 6

chiens 8

chiens 9

chiens 11

chiens 12

chiens 13

chiens 16

chiens 49

chiens 53

chiens 50

Iscrizioni commoventi, dicevamo: in certi casi l’incontro fra uomo e animale può rivelarsi una bellissima amicizia, tanto che ogni barriera specifica viene a cadere di fronte all’affetto creatosi fra due esseri viventi.
Eppure, bisogna ammetterlo, il Cimitero dei Cani fa anche un po’ sorridere. I mausolei sfarzosi e riccamente ornati, le grosse lapidi erette per un pesciolino rosso o per un criceto, i monumenti fatti scolpire appositamente per tartarughe, cavalli, topolini, uccelli, conigli e perfino gazzelle, fennec e lemuri ci possono sembrare in alcuni casi francamente esagerati.

chiens 55

chiens 48

chiens 45

chiens 44

chiens 40

chiens 35

chiens 36

chiens 38

chiens 37

chiens 19

chiens 27

chiens 22

chiens 31

chiens 30

chiens 21

chiens 20

chiens 18

Ma si tratta sempre, a ben vedere, dello stesso antico bisogno (forse, sì, patetico, ma incrollabile e a suo modo eroico) che sta alla base di qualsiasi necropoli: la necessità, tutta umana, di dare valore alle cose e alla vita, cercando di impedire che il passaggio sulla terra di coloro che amiamo termini senza lasciare traccia alcuna. Una battaglia destinata a fallire, in ultima istanza, ma che offre conforto a chi si trova ad elaborare un lutto.

chiens 15

chiens 14

chiens 46

chiens 39

chiens 34

Abbandoniamo il Cimitero dei Cani, non prima di aver visitato un’ultima, umile tomba: quella di una celebre star del cinema…

chiens 47

Terminiamo quindi il nostro viaggio con una visita a quello che è probabilmente il luogo più magico dell’intera capitale: il Musée des Arts Forains.
Si tratta di un’enorme collezione/installazione dedicata alle  fêtes foraines, cioè quelle giostre itineranti che da noi presero il nome di luna park (dal primo parco di attrazioni della storia, a Coney Island). Un tempo le giostre non erano nemmeno itineranti, ma trovavano posto all’interno delle città; poi, in seguito alle lamentele per il rumore, vennero spostate lontano dai centri abitati, e con il nomadismo iniziò anche il loro declino.

artsforains 1

artsforains 4

artsforains 5

artsforains 10

artsforains 11

artsforains 12

artsforains 13

Il Museo è collocato all’interno dei pittoreschi Pavillons Bercy, antichi depositi di vino, e magazzini di scalo per le merci in attesa d’essere caricate sui battelli fluviali. La visita guidata (che va prenotata in anticipo, visto che i gruppi hanno un numero limitato di partecipanti) si articola in tre diversi spazi: il Teatro del Meraviglioso, il Musée des Art Forains vero e proprio, e il Salone Veneziano.

artsforains 2

Il Teatro del Meraviglioso accoglie il visitatore con un’esplosione di luci colorate e di strane scenografie, in una sorta di ritorno all’atmosfera delle esposizioni universali di inizio secolo. C’è da restare a bocca aperta. Un elefante, appeso ad una mongolfiera, porta sulla schiena un incredibile e fragilissimo diorama creato interamente in mollica di pane; fra le foglie e gli intricati tronchi naturali, appositamente selezionati per la loro forma curiosa e artistica, fanno la ruota i pavoni meccanici; statue di sirene montano la guardia agli antenati dei flipper; tutto intorno, macchinari e giocattoli fantastici mentre, in fondo al salone, una corsa di cavalli con le biglie impegna i visitatori in una gara all’ultimo lancio. Sì, perché tutte le giostre che si trovano nel museo, originali di fine ‘800 e inizio ‘900, sono ancora funionanti e il tour include l’esperienza di provarne alcune in prima persona.

artsforains 17

artsforains 19

artsforains 18

artsforains 16

artsforains 20

artsforains 21

artsforains 23

artsforains 24

artsforains 25

artsforains 26

artsforains 27

artsforains 28

artsforains 29

artsforains 30

Nel salone a fianco, è la musica a farla da padrone. Un unicorno se ne sta ritto vicino ad un pianoforte i cui tasti si muovono da soli, mentre la guida turistica (per metà Virgilio, per metà imbonitore) dà inizio alle danze, facendo vibrare le pareti al suono di un antico organo e un carillon di tubi che si diramano lungo su tutte le pareti. Assieme ai visitatori che si cimentano in un valzer improvvisato, si muovono a tempo di musica sui loro baldacchini e parapetti anche gli automi con le fattezze di alcuni personaggi famosi degli anni d’oro di Parigi.

artsforains 31

artsforains 32

artsforains 33

artsforains 34

Questo spazio, evocativo e misterioso, viene utilizzato per serate ed eventi ed è anche dotato, per queste occasioni speciali, di 12 video proiettori che sono in grado di trasformare i muri nelle pareti interne del Nautilus, il celebre sottomarino del Capitano Nemo.

artsforains 7

Ci si sposta poi in un diverso padiglione, dove è ospitato il Musée des Arts Forains, dedicato al luna park vero e proprio. Come prima cosa, si prova sui propri timpani la potenza sonora dell’Organetto di Barberia: quando il mantice soffiava nelle canne, questo strumento a rullo spandeva l’allegra musica per chilometri sottovento, annunciando con le sue note l’arrivo delle giostre in città.

artsforains 41

artsforains 35

artsforains 38

artsforains 39

Poi, ecco comparire l’emblema e il simbolo di qualsiasi luna park: la giostra con i cavalli. Ad una popolaione divenuta urbana a seguito della rivoluzione industriale, questa attrazione ricordava le proprie origini rurali; e, al tempo stesso, prometteva alla gente comune il sogno di sentirsi nobili cavalieri per lo spazio di qualche giro di giostra.
Uno dei dettagli interessanti è il fatto che solitamente i cavalli hanno un solo lato perfettamente decorato e dipinto, quello che dà verso l’esterno. Il loro fianco interno, invece, è pitturato molto più grossolanamente – con il tipico cinismo dei circensi, i costruttori sapevano che l’importante era attirare chi sulla giostra non era ancora salito!

artsforains 42

I visitatori montano sulle loro selle, chiudono gli occhi, e sulle note di Mon manège à moi di Édith Piaf i cavalli di legno si mettono in moto… da quando fu creata, nel 1890, più di due milioni di persone hanno riscoperto la loro anima di bambini su questa giostra di origine tedesca.

artsforains 45

artsforains 48

artsforains 47

artsforains 51

artsforains 52

artsforains 53

artsforains 54

artsforains 59

Dopo aver passato in rassegna innumerevoli altri tipi di attrazioni, si sale sulla giostra probabilmente più bizzarra dell’intera collezione: un manège vélocipédique del 1897. Qui sono i visitatori stessi che con le loro pedalate mettono in moto la giostra, raggiungendo velocità da capogiro.

artsforains 55

artsforains 56

artsforains 57

artsforains 58

Infine, ecco che ci si sposta nel terzo padiglione, dedicato a Venezia, per una “corsa” molto più rilassante e serena su una giostra di gondole, mentre si ammira l’insolita ricostruzione dei canali e dei palazzi che adorna le pareti.

artsforains 62

artsforains 61

La visita termina con uno spettacolo di musica lirica interpretata dagli automi di Casanova, del Doge, di Arlecchino, Pantalone, eccetera.

artsforains 63

artsforains 64

Ritornati fuori, alla luce del sole, ci si accorge con sorpresa che senza l’aiuto di un orologio sarebbe impossibile dire quanto sia durata la visita. Un’ora e mezza, due ore, o ancora di più? Per qualche ragione, all’interno di questo spazio, per il quale l’aggettivo “meraviglioso” non è affatto fuori luogo, ogni cognizione del tempo è rimasta alterata.
Ci si guarda l’un l’altro, ed ecco che – ultima magia – negli occhi di tutti brilla quell’antico senso di incanto che sembrava ormai perduto.

artsforains 49

MUSEE DE LA CHASSE ET DE LA NATURE
62, rue des Archives
Apertura: Tutti i giorni tranne il lunedì.
Orari: Mar-Dom 11-18, Mer 11-21.30
Sito Web

CEMETIERE DES CHIENS
4, pont de Clichy
Asnières-sur-Seine
Apertura: tutti i giorni tranne il lunedì.
Orari: dal 16 marzo al 15 ottobre 10-18, dal 16 ottobre al 15 marzo 10-16.30

MUSEE DES ARTS FORAINS
53, Av des Terroirs de France
Apertura e orari: consultare il calendario per le prenotazioni sul sito.
Sito Web

(Questo articolo è l’ultimo di una serie dedicata a Parigi. I primi due capitoli sono qui e qui.)