Jules Talrich, Between Anatomy and the Fairground

Some time ago I wrote a piece about those peculiar epiphanies linking different points on our mental map, which we thought were distant from each other, those unexpected convergences between stories and characters which at first glance appear to be unrelated.

Here’s another one: what do the preserved corpse of Jeremy Bentham (1), the famous Duchenne study on facial expressions (2), the amusement park museum in Paris (3) and anatomical waxes (4) have in common?

The link between all those things is one man: Jules Talrich, born in Paris in 1826.

The Talrich family came from Perpignan, in the Pyrenees. There Jules’s grandfather, Thadée, had been chief surgeon at the local hospital; there his father, Jacques, had worked as a military surgeon before moving to Paris, two years prior to Jules’ birth.
As a child, therefore, Jules grew up in contact with medicine and the anatomical practice. In fact, his father had become famous for his wax models; this renown earned him a post as official ceroplast at the Faculty of Medicine in Paris in 1824. We can imagine little Jules running around in his father’s workshop, looking at his dad with admiration as he worked on his écorchés (flayed) models.

When he was only 6 years old, in 1832, Jules probably saw his father modeling the head of Jeremy Bentham.
The famous utilitarian philosopher had decided, a couple of years before he died, that his body should have been publicly dissected, embalmed and exposed in a case. But the process of mummification on his head, carried out by an anatomist friend of Bentham, Southwood Smith, had not given the expected results: the skin on his face had become dark and shriveled, and was judged excessively macabre. So Jacques Talrich – whose reputation as a ceroplast extended across the Channel – had been commissioned a wax reproduction of Bentham’s head. The so-called “auto icon” is still exhibited today in a hallway at the University College of London.

So it was that the young Jules grew up surrounded by wax models, and taking part in his father’s dissections of corpses in the Faculty of Medicine. When he was little more than a boy, he began working as a “prosector”, i.e. dissecting and preparing anatomical pieces to be used during class at the University; in his dad’s laboratory, he soon learned the art of replicating with molten wax the most intricate muscular and vascular structures of the human body.

When Jacques died in 1851, Jules Talrich inherited the family business. In 1862 he was appointed ceroplast at the University, the same place that his father had occupied for so many years; and just like his father, Jules also became renowned for his wax and plaster anatomical models, both normal and pathological, which on the account of their exquisite workmanship were commissioned and exhibited in several museums, and turned out a huge success in several Universal Expositions.

Besides a vast scientific production, the Maison Talrich provided services in the funeral business, modeling funeral masks or reconstructing illustrious faces such as that of Cardinal Richelieu, realized from his embalmed head. The ability of the French ceroplast also turned out to be useful in some criminal cases, for example to identify the corpse of a woman cut in half which was found in the Seine in 1876. Talrich’s waxes were also highly requested in the religious field, and the company made several important wax effigies of saints and martyrs.

However, Talrich also influenced the world of entertainment and traveling fairs, at least to some extent. At the beginning of 1866 on the Grands Boulevards he opened his “Musée Français”, a wax museum in the spirit of the famous Madame Tussauds in London.

Talrich’s exhibition had a markedly mainstream appeal: upstairs, the public could see aome literary, historical and mythological characters (from Adam and Eve to Don Quixote, from Hercules to Vesalius), while for a surcharge of 5 francs one could access the underground floor, by descending a narrow spiral staircase. Here, in a calculated “chamber of horrors” atmosphere, were collected the most morbid attractions — torture scenes, pathological waxes, and so on. The visit ended with the illusion of the “Talking Head” illusion, patented by Professor Pepper (also inventor of the Pepper’s ghost); unfortunately the public soon realized that the effect was achieved by hiding an actor’s body behind two mirrors, and in a short time the real entertainment for the crowd became throwing paper balls on the poor man’s head.

The fact that a renowned and serious ceroplast, with a permanent job at the University, devoted himself to this kind of popular entertainment should not be astonishing. His museum, in fact, was part of a larger movement that in the second half of the 19th century brought anatomy into circuses and traveling fairs, a kind of attraction balancing between science, education and sensationalism.

In those years nearly every sideshow had a wax museum. And in it,

pedagogical figures had to provide information on distant populations and on the mysteries of procreation, they had to explain why one needed to wash and abstain from drinking too much, to show the perils of venereal diseases and the ambiguities of consanguinity. It was an illustrated morality, but also an opportunity to gaze at the forbidden in good conscience, to become a voyeur by virtue. A summary of the perversities of bourgeois civilization.

(A. de Baecque, “Tristes cires”, Libération, 13 luglio 2001)

A strange and ambiguous mixture of science and entertainment:

Traveling anatomical museums found their place at the fair, alongside the pavilions of scientific popularization, historical wax museums and other dioramas, all manifestations of the transition from high culture to popular culture. These new types of museums differed from the pedagogical university museums on the account of their purpose and the type of public they were intended for: contrary to academical institutions, they had to touch the general public of traveling fairs as lucrative attractions, which explains the spectacular nature of some pieces. And yet, they never completely lost their pedagogical vocation, although retranslated in a moralizing sense, as testified by the common collections about “social hygiene”.

(H. Palouzié, C. Ducourau, “De la collection Fontana à la collection Spitzner,
l’aventure des cires anatomiques de Paris à Montpellier
”, in In Situ n. 31, 2017)

The Musée Français was short-lived, and Talrich was forced to close after less than two years of activity; in 1876, he opened a second museum near Montmartre, this time a more scientific (albeit still voyeuristic) installation. Almost 300 pathological models were exposed here, as well as some ethnological waxes.


But besides his own museums, Jules Talrich supplied waxworks and plaster models for a whole range of other collections — both stable and itinerant — such as the Musée Grevin, the Grand Panopticum de l’Univers or the very famous Spitzner Museum.
In fact, many of the pieces circulating in amusement parks were made by Talrich; and some of these anatomical waxes, together with real pathological and teratological preparations, are now kept in a “secret cabinet” inside the Musée des Arts Forains at the Pavillons de Bercy in Paris. (This museum, entirely dedicated to traveling carnivals, is in my opinion one of the most marvelous places in the world and, ça va sans dire, I have included it in my book Paris Mirabilia).

Jules Talrich retired in 1903, but his grandchildren continued the business for some time. Jules and his father Jacques are remembered as the greatest French ceroplasts, together with Jean-Baptiste Laumonier (1749-1818), Jules Baretta (1834-1923) and Charles Jumelin (1848-1924).

In closing, here’s one last curiosity — as well as the last “convergence”, of the four I mentioned at the beginning.

Several photographs of Jules Talrich exist, and for a peculilar reason. A lover of physiognomy and phrenology himself, Jules agreed in 1861 to take part in Guillaume Duchenne‘s experiments on how facial expressions are connected to emotions. The shots depicting Talrich were included by Duchenne in his Mécanisme de la physionomie humaine, published the following year.

But Jules’ beautiful face, with his iconic mustache, is also visible in some plasterwork, which Talrich provided with his own features: whether this was simply an artist’s whim, or a symbolic meditation on his own mortality, we will never know.

(Thanks, calliroe!)

Bizzarro Bazar a Parigi – II

deyrolle 1

Cominciamo il nostro secondo tour di Parigi facendo una capatina da Deyrolle. Dal 1831 questo favoloso negozio propone, in un’atmosfera da camera delle meraviglie, importanti collezioni tassidermiche, entomologiche e naturalistiche.

deyrolle 2

deyrolle 3

deyrolle 4

La Maison Deyrolle ospita anche regolarmente esposizioni di famosi artisti (vi sono passate le opere, fra gli altri, di Niki De Saint Phalle e Damien Hirst), invitati ad elaborare dei progetti specifici a partire dall’immenso catalogo di preparati tassidermici ed entomologici a disposizione.

deyrolle 5

deyrolle 6

deyrolle 7

deyrolle 8

Aggirandosi per le stanze stracolme di animali, fra uccelli esotici e orsi bruni, non si fatica a capire perché Deyrolle sia una vera e propria istituzione, e conti i migliori professionisti sul campo. Va anche sottolineato che nessuno di questi animali è stato ucciso al fine di essere imbalsamato: gli esemplari non domestici provengono da zoo, circhi o allevamenti nei quali sono morti di vecchiaia o malattia.

MuseeOrsay_20070324

Spostiamoci ora in uno dei templi dell’arte mondiale, il Musée d’Orsay. Qui, fino al 25 Gennaio 2015, sarà possibile visitare l’esposizione Sade – Attaquer le soleil, che si propone di rintracciare l’influenza del Marchese De Sade sull’arte del XIX e XX secolo.

sade 2

Franz von Stuck, Giuditta e Oloferne, 1927

sade 3

Eugène Delacroix, Medea furiosa, 1838

La mostra da sola vale il biglietto d’ingresso: l’impressionante corpus di opere selezionate conta più di 500 pezzi. Da Delacroix a von Stuck, da Goya a Kubin, da Füssli a Beardsley, da Ernst a Bellmer, l’esposizione si concentra sull’impossibilità di rappresentare il desiderio, sul corpo, sulla crudeltà. La filosofia sadiana, per quanto negata e messa al bando per più di un secolo, si rivela in realtà un fil rouge, insinuatosi clandestinamente nel mondo dell’arte, che unisce pittori differenti e lontani fra loro nel tempo e nello spazio, una sorta di corrente sotterranea che porta fino alla “riscoperta” dell’autore da parte dei Surrealisti e al suo successivo sdoganamento.

sade 4

Franz von Stuck, Il peccato, 1899

sade 5

Alfred Kubin, La donna a cavallo, 1900-1901

Ma l’influenza di Sade non risiede soltanto nelle opere degli artisti che ha in qualche modo ispirato: secondo i curatori, egli ha cambiato anche il modo in cui guardiamo all’arte precedente ai suoi scritti. La prima sezione infatti, intitolata Humain, trop humain, inhumain mostra come tutti i temi sadiani fossero già presenti nell’arte prima di lui, ma all’interno di codici accettabili. Una scena di martirio in una chiesa, ad esempio, non scandalizzava nessuno. Sade però fa cadere il velo, e dopo di lui non sarà più possibile ammirare uno spettacolo di violenza senza pensare alle sue parole: “La crudeltà, ben lontana dall’essere un vizio, è il primo sentimento che la natura imprime in noi; il bambino rompe il suo giocattolo, morde il seno della nutrice, strangola il suo uccellino, molto prima d’avere l’età della ragione” (La filosofia nel boudoir, 1795).

sade 6

Jindrich Styrsky, Emilie viene a me in sogno, 1933

sade 9

Francisco de Goya, I cannibali, 1800-1808

sade 1

Félix Vallotton, Orfeo smembrato dalle Menadi, 1914

Non lontano dal Musée d’Orsay si trova il quartiere universitario della Sorbona. Ci trasferiamo al Museo della Storia della Medicina, che raccoglie una collezione di strumenti chirurgici d’epoca.

histoire de la medecine 1

histoire de la medecine 2

histoire de la medecine 3

histoire de la medecine 4

histoire de la medecine 5

histoire de la medecine 6

histoire de la medecine 7

histoire de la medecine 8

histoire de la medecine 9

histoire de la medecine 10

histoire de la medecine 11

Fra i pezzi più straordinari, vi sono certamente gli strumenti ideati nell’800 dall’urologo Jean Civiale per l’estrazione dei calcoli (le immagini qui sotto rendono bene l’idea di quanto l’operazione fosse complicata – e terrificante, visto che il tutto era svolto in assenza di anestesia); e se questo non bastasse a farvi venire la pelle d’oca, ecco le seghe con catena a carica automatica per amputazioni, fra gli strumenti meno precisi e maneggevoli mai sperimentati in chirurgia.

histoire de la medecine 15

histoire de la medecine 17

histoire de la medecine 16

histoire de la medecine 14

histoire de la medecine 12

  histoire de la medecine 20

histoire de la medecine 22

histoire de la medecine 23

histoire de la medecine 24

histoire de la medecine 25

histoire de la medecine 26

histoire de la medecine 27

histoire de la medecine 28

histoire de la medecine 29

histoire de la medecine 30

histoire de la medecine 31

histoire de la medecine 32

histoire de la medecine 33

histoire de la medecine 34

histoire de la medecine 35

Ma il vero gioiello del museo, a nostro parere, è il tavolo realizzato dall’italiano Efisio Marini e offerto a Napoleone III.

histoire de la medecine 37

Perché è così interessante? Perché quello che sembra un semplice tavolino mosaicato su cui è appoggiata la scultura di un piede, è in realtà formato a partire da pezzi pietrificati di cervello, sangue, bile, fegato, polmoni e ghiandole. Il piede è un vero piede, anch’esso pietrificato, così come le quattro orecchie che spuntano dalla superficie del tavolino e le vertebre sezionate che lo adornano. Osservando da vicino quest’opera incredibile, non si fatica a comprendere perché Efisio Marini fosse considerato uno dei più abili anatomisti preparatori del suo tempo (vedi il nostro articolo sui pietrificatori).

histoire de la medecine 36

histoire de la medecine 38

histoire de la medecine 39

Ritorniamo infine ai nostri amati animali, ma stavolta con una visita più classica: quella alla Grande Galérie de l’Evolution. Non è certo un museo poco conosciuto, quindi aspettatevi un po’ di coda e le grida entusiaste dei più piccoli.

gge 2

gge 1

Ma una volta dentro, tutti ridiventano bambini. Dopo essere passati sotto al gigantesco scheletro di un capodoglio, e una prima sala dedicata agli animali marini (per la verità un po’ deludente), si arriva al grande salone che contiene una fra le attrazioni principali: la spettacolare camminata dei mammiferi africani.

gge 5

gge 6

gge 7

gge 8

gge 9

gge 10

gge 11

gge 12

gge 13

Sotto una volta d’acciaio e vetro che cambia colore imitando le diverse fasi del giorno, gli animali della savana sembrano avviati verso un’invisibile Arca di Noè, o verso un futuro ancora sconosciuto (una nuova evoluzione?). Fu proprio questa installazione curiosa e innovativa che vent’anni fa, quando la Galleria aprì i battenti sostituendo la precedente Galleria di Zoologia, le assicurò una rapida fama.

gge 14

gge 15

gge 16

gge 17

gge 18

gge 19

gge 20

gge 21

gge 22

gge 23

gge 24

Ma la biodiversità e le infinite forme di vita plasmate dall’evoluzione trovano spazio sui tre piani del complesso, fra diorami artistici e illuminanti raffronti fra le varie specie.

gge 30

gge 26

gge 29

gge 28

gge 25

gge 34

gge 32

gge 33

gge 38

gge 31

gge 27

gge 4

gge 36

gge 37

Fra qualche giorno la terza ed ultima parte di questa ricognizione della Parigi meno risaputa: preparatevi perché abbiamo tenuto il meglio per la fine…

gge 39

LA MAISON DEYROLLE
46, rue du Bac
Apertura: dal lunedì al sabato
Orari: Lun 10-13 e 14-19, mar-sab 10-19
Sito web

MUSEE D’ORSAY
1, rue de la Légion d’Honneur
Apertura: chiuso il lunedì
Orari: 9.30-18, il giovedì 9.30-21.45
Sito web

MUSEE DE L’HISTOIRE DE LA MEDECINE
12, rue de l’Ecole de Médecine
Apertura: tutti i giorni tranne giovedì e domenica
Orari: 14-17.30
Sito web

GRANDE GALERIE DE L’EVOLUTION
36 rue Geoffroy Saint-Hilaire
Apertura: tutti i giorni tranne il martedì e il 1 maggio.
Orari: 10-18
Sito web

(Questo articolo è il secondo di una serie dedicata a Parigi. Gli altri due capitoli sono qui e qui.)

Bizzarro Bazar a Parigi – I

View on Paris

Qualche anno fa avevamo pubblicato due articoli-reportage su New York (li trovate qui e qui), dedicati a musei, negozi e luoghi insoliti della Grande Mela. Quest’anno, invece, il vostro fedele esploratore del perturbante si è diretto a Parigi, dove ha scovato per voi alcuni fra gli angoli meno battuti della capitale francese.

Già nel XVIII secolo Francesco Algarotti sentenziava “molti vanno a Parigi, ma pochi ci sono stati“, e forse questo è ancora più vero oggi che il turismo di massa detta le regole per visitare qualsiasi città, imponendo al viaggiatore tutta una serie di tappe obbligate da spuntare come caselline della tombola. Questa esperienza di superficie certamente rassicura il pellegrino di aver visto “tutte le cose più importanti”, ma rischia di farlo tornare a casa con l’immagine della città che già aveva prima di partire. E invece anche Parigi, come tutti i luoghi ricchi d’una storia antica e travagliata, nasconde un volto sconosciuto ai più.

Dimenticatevi quindi – o, meglio, date pure per assodati – i fasti di Versailles, le folle che risalgono la Torre Eiffel, gli assiepati scalini di Montmartre, il sorriso beffardo della Gioconda o lo shopping di lusso sui Champs-Elisées; e preparatevi per un viaggio alla scoperta dei meravigliosi gioielli che le luci della Ville Lumière hanno lasciato nella penombra.

ecole_veterinaire2

Come prima tappa partiamo dalla banlieue a sud-est di Parigi, a soli tre chilometri dalla capitale, visitando a Maisons-Alfort il Musée Fragonard, che si trova ospitato all’interno della Scuola Veterinaria. Qui un’immensa collezione di ossa e di scheletri animali si contende la scena con dei modelli in gesso degli organi interni, a grandezza naturale oppure in scala notevolmente maggiore, a fini di studio.

fragonard-1

fragonard-2

fragonard-3

fragonard-4

fragonard-5

fragonard-6

fragonard-7

fragonard-8

fragonard-9

fragonard-10

fragonard-11

fragonard-12

Le cose cominciano a farsi più impressionanti quando si raggiunge la sezione teratologica del museo, che espone le diverse malformazioni, mutazioni genetiche e mostruosità. Preparati a secco, mummificati, oppure in soluzione ci presentano la versione animale dei “gemelli siamesi”: agnelli craniopaghi e toracopaghi, maiali con sviluppi fetali parassitari e galline con arti in sovrannumero si alternano a feti ciclopi, vitelli idrocefali e capre nate senza testa (anencefalia).

fragonard-13

fragonard-14

fragonard-15

fragonard-16

fragonard-17

fragonard-18

fragonard-19

fragonard-20

fragonard-21

fragonard-22

fragonard-23

fragonard-24

Ma è nell’ultima stanza che sono contenuti i reperti più straordinari. Si tratta dei celebri écorchés di Fragonard, di cui abbiamo parlato in questo articolo: duecento anni prima di Gunther Von Hagens e del suo Body Worlds, e senza alcuna delle tecnologie ultramoderne disponibili oggi, l’anatomista francese era riuscito a preservare perfettamente alcuni cadaveri sezionati e fissati in modo da esporre l’anatomia interna a beneficio degli studenti.

fragonard-25

fragonard-26

fragonard-27

fragonard-28

In alcuni casi disposti in pose artistiche, come “l’uomo con la mandibola” o i “feti danzanti“, i preparati anatomici sono ancora perfetti, con le loro vernici lucide e brillanti e un’espressività per nulla diminuita dal passare dei secoli.

fragonard-31

fragonard-29

fragonard-30

fragonard-32

fragonard-33

fragonard-34

Difficile non rimanere a bocca aperta di fronte al più incredibile fra tutti i pezzi conservati qui: il “Cavaliere dell’Apocalisse“, montato su un vero e proprio cavallo, a sua volta sezionato.

fragonard-35

fragonard-36

fragonard-37

fragonard-38

fragonard-39

fragonard-40

Spostiamoci ora nel cuore della città.
Quartiere un tempo malfamato, divenuto iconico per i suoi spettacoli osé, per il Moulin Rouge, i bordelli, il Grand Guignol e i cafés a tema, Pigalle si è oggi adeguato ai tempi e alle esigenze turistiche, reinventandosi come paradiso dei locali di lap dance e dei negozi del sesso. Lungo il Boulevard de Clichy le vetrine propongono, senza censure o pudori, una costellazione di futuristici sex toys, coadiuvanti, afrodisiaci, ritardanti, arditi capi di lingerie affiancati al consueto armamentario BDSM fatto di cuoio, borchie, scudisci e ball gag.

Proprio al centro di questa esibizione del sesso fatto spettacolo e merchandising, si apre il Musée de l’Erotisme. Anche ad Amsterdam, nel Red Light District, ne esiste uno di simile, ma quello di Parigi si distingue dal suo omonimo olandese per almeno tre motivi: il primo è la ricchezza della sezione antropologica, che conta svariate decine di manufatti provenienti da diverse epoche e latitudini.

erotisme-1

erotisme-2

erotisme-3

erotisme-4

erotisme-5

erotisme-6

Dalle terrecotte etrusche ai feticci africani, dalle colorate statue balinesi agli avori cinesi, la collezione dimostra come il tema erotico sia stato affrontato senza particolari inibizioni da quasi tutte le culture tradizionali e spesso proprio nel contesto dell’arte sacra (come simbolo/auspicio/invocazione di fecondità e fertilità).

erotisme-7

erotisme-8

erotisme-9

erotisme-10

erotisme-11

Il secondo punto di interesse è la parte dedicata alla storia e al costume delle case chiuse dalla fine del I secolo al 1946, con fotografie d’epoca, documenti vari e perfino un bidet in porcellana originale (come è noto, questo accessorio da bagno si diffuse proprio nell’ambito della prostituzione).

erotisme-12

erotisme-13

erotisme-14

erotisme-15

erotisme-16

erotisme-17

Infine, ai livelli più alti (il museo si sviluppa su ben sette piani!) vengono ospitate mostre temporanee di artisti internazionali, le cui opere esposte sono in alcuni casi disponibili per l’acquisto.

erotisme-18

erotisme-19

erotisme-21

erotisme-23

erotisme-22

erotisme-20

Ben più dei sexy shop che lo circondano, il Museo rimanda un’immagine dell’eros che un po’ si è andata a perdere nel tempo: attraverso queste varie declinazioni artistiche, raffigurazioni antiche e contemporanee, il desiderio sessuale viene riportato alla sua originaria dimensione mitologica, archetipica e sacra.

erotisme-24

Dall’Eros passiamo a Thanatos, e addentriamoci nei labirinti sotterranei che si snodano sotto le case di Montparnasse.
Nonostante il loro nome ricordi quelle romane, le Catacombe di Parigi erano in realtà le antiche cave da cui veniva estratta la pietra per costruire la città: quando nel 1785 il Cimitero degli Innocenti nel quartiere delle Halles, che era stato in uso per quasi dieci secoli, venne evacuato a causa del pericolo d’infezione, si decise di spostare i resti nelle cave ormai abbandonate. Consacrate nel 1786 come ossario municipale, le Catacombe ospitarono fino al 1814 le salme traslate da tutti i cimiteri della capitale, mano a mano che questi venivano chiusi per insalubrità. Oggi si stima che vi siano raccolte le ossa di circa sei o sette milioni di parigini.

catacombes-1

catacombes-2

catacombes-3

catacombes-4

catacombes-5

catacombes-9

Fermati, qui sta l’impero della morte“, avverte un verso inciso all’entrata dell’ossario.
A venti metri sotto il suolo, sui lati degli stretti corridoi e delle gallerie oscure, sono disposte le une sulle altre migliaia e migliaia di ossa, a formare una scenografia macabra impressionante.

catacombes-10

catacombes-7

catacombes-11