Links, curiosities & mixed wonders – 3

New miscellanea of interesting links and bizarre facts.

  • There’s a group of Italian families who decided, several years ago, to try and live on top of the trees. In 2010 journalist Antonio Gregolin visited these mysterious “hermits” — actually not as reclusive as you might think —, penning a wonderful reportage on their arboreal village (text in Italian, but lots of amazing pics).

  • An interesting long read on disgust, on the cognitive biases it entails, and on how it could have played an essential role in the rise of morals, politics and laws — basically, in shaping human societies.
  • Are you ready for a travel in music, space and time? On this website you get to choose a country and a decade from 1900 to this day, and discover what were the biggest hits back in the time. Plan your trip/playlist on a virtual taxi picking unconceivably distant stops: you might start off from the first recordings of traditional chants in Tanzania, jump to Korean disco music from the Eighties, and reach some sweet Norwegian psychedelic pop from the Sixties. Warning, may cause addiction.
  • Speaking of time, it’s a real mystery why this crowdfunding campaign for the ultimate minimalist watch didn’t succeed. It would have made a perfect accessory for philosophers, and latecomers.
  • The last issue of Illustrati has an evocative title and theme, “Circles of light”. In my contribution, I tell the esoteric underground of Northern Italy in which I grew up: The Only Chakra.
  • During the terrible flooding that recently hit Louisiana, some coffins were seen floating down the streets. A surreal sight, but not totally surprising: here is my old post about Holt Cemetery in New Orleans, where from time to time human remains emerge from the ground.

  • In the Pelican State, you can always rely on traditional charms and gris-gris to avoid bad luck — even if by now they have become a tourist attraction: here are the five best shops to buy your voodoo paraphernalia in NOLA.
  • Those who follow my work have probably heard me talking about “dark wonder“, the idea that we need to give back to wonder its original dominance on darkness. A beautiful article on the philosophy of awe (Italian only) reiterates the concept: “the original astonishment, the thauma, is not always just a moment of grace, a positive feeling: it possesses a dimension of horror and anguish, felt by anyone who approaches an unknown reality, so different as to provoke turmoil and fear“.
  • Which are the oldest mummies in the world? The pharaohs of Egypt?
    Wrong. Chinchorro mummies, found in the Atacama desert between Chile and Peru, are more ancient than the Egyptian ones. And not by a century or two: they are two thousand years older.
    (Thanks, Cristina!)

  • Some days ago Wu Ming 1 pointed me to an article appeared on The Atlantic about an imminent head transplant: actually, this is not recent news, as neurosurgeon from Turin Sergio Canavero has been a controversial figure for some years now. On Bizzarro Bazar I discussed the history of head transplants in an old article, and if I never talked about Canavero it’s because the whole story is really a bit suspect.
    Let’s recap the situation: in 2013 Canavero caused some fuss in the scientific world by declaring that by 2017 he might be able to perform a human head transplant (or, better, a body transplant). His project, named HEAVEN/Gemini (Head Anastomosis Venture with Cord Fusion), aims to overcome the difficulties in reconnecting the spinal chord by using some fusogenic “glues” such as polyethylene glycol (PEG) or chitosan to induce merging between the donor’s and the receiver’s cells. This means we would be able to provide a new, healthier body to people who are dying of any kind of illness (with the obvious exception of cerebral pathologies).
    As he was not taken seriously, Canavero gave it another try at the beginning of 2015, announcing shortly thereafter that he found a volunteer for his complex surgical procedure, thirty-year-old Russian Valery Spiridonov who is suffering from an incurable genetic disease. The scientific community, once again, labeled his theories as baseless, dangerous science fiction: it’s true that transplant technology dramatically improved during the last few years, but according to the experts we are still far from being able to attempt such an endeavour on a human being — not to mention, of course, the ethical issues.
    At the beginning of this year, Canavero announced he has made some progress: he claimed he successfully tested his procedure on mice and even on a monkey, with the support of a Chinese team, and leaked a video and some controversial photos.
    As can be easily understood, the story is far from limpid. Canavero is progressively distancing himself from the scientific community, and seems to be especially bothered by the peer-review system not allowing him (shoot!) to publish his research without it first being evaluated and examined; even the announcement of his experiments on mice and monkeys was not backed up by any published paper. Basically, Canavero has proved to be very skillful in creating a media hype (popularizing his advanced techinque on TV, in the papers and even a couple of TEDx talks with the aid of… some picturesque and oh-so-very-Italian spaghetti), and in time he was able to build for himself the character of an eccentric and slightly crazy genius, a visionary Frankenstein who might really have found a cure-all remedy — if only his dull collegues would listen to him. At the same time he appears to be uncomfortable with scientific professional ethics, and prefers to keep calling out for “private philantropists” of the world, looking for some patron who is willing to provide the 12.5 millions needed to give his cutting-edge experiment a try.
    In conclusion, looking at all this, it is hard not to think of some similar, well-known incidents. But never say never: we will wait for the next episode, and in the meantime…
  • …why not (re)watch  The Thing With Two Heads (1972), directed by exploitation genius Lee Frost?
    This trashy little gem feature the tragicomic adventures of a rich and racist surgeon — played by Ray Milland, at this point already going through a low phase in his career — who is terminally ill and therefore elaborates a complex scheme to have his head transplanted on a healthy body; but he ends waking up attached to the shoulder of an African American man from death row, determined to prove his own innocence. Car chases, cheesy gags and nonsense situations make for one of the weirdest flicks ever.

Necromance

20131107_160124

Los Angeles, California. I turisti, come sempre, cercano le star su Sunset Boulevard, ridiventano bambini nei parchi di attrazioni degli studios, oppure sognano di essere soccorsi da Pamela Anderson sulle immense spiagge di Santa Monica.

Ma nel cuore dell’assolata metropoli, fra le boutique e i locali notturni della celeberrima Melrose Avenue (e a un paio di isolati dalla Melrose Place della soap opera), sorge una piccola bottega che offre un tipo di shopping un po’ più particolare.

20131107_160235

Si tratta di Necromance, negozio aperto nel 1991, specializzato in esemplari naturalistici e in un vasto assortimento di stranezze. Certo non si tratta di un paradiso come possono essere Obscura di New York o il nostro ex-Nautilus (ora reincarnatosi nell’Obsoleto Store di Modena), e i più snob storceranno il naso vedendo che le giovani proprietarie non fanno segreto della loro inclinazione goth. Ma il mondo è bello perché è vario, e quando si incontrano esercizi simili andrebbero sempre salutati con entusiasmo.

20131107_165328

20131107_164456

20131107_164603

20131107_160316

Necromance è composto di due stanze a tema distinto, tanto che per un periodo il negozio è stato fisicamente diviso in due; la prima sala è quella dedicata alle collezioni naturalistiche. Vi potete trovare conchiglie, teschi e ossa di ogni tipo di animale, scheletri posati, innumerevoli insetti, stampe e illustrazioni, esemplari imbalsamati e preparazioni in liquido.

20131107_160324

20131107_164357

20131107_164416

20131107_164437

20131107_164447

Gli esemplari conservati sotto glicerina e preparati con il metodo clearing and staining sono ottenuti grazie a bagni enzimatici che rendono la carne traslucida; la struttura ossea è quindi colorata in rosso e le cartilagini in blu, in modo da consentirne uno studio approfondito (Nota: se volete divertirvi a giocare al piccolo chimico, qui trovate le istruzioni per rendere un pesce trasparente).

20131107_164655

20131107_164706

20131107_164714

20131107_164728

In questa sezione trovano posto anche molti materiali “a consumo”: cassette piene di ossicini più o meno grandi, piume e penne, zampe di alligatore o di pollo, code e teste di serpenti a sonagli, e via dicendo. Più che servire per qualche rito voodoo, è chiaro che si tratta di rifornimenti per artisti, stilisti fai-da-te e altri clienti interessati a decorare i propri abiti o la propria casa con fantasie macabre.

20131107_164339

20131107_164552

20131107_164523

20131107_164744

20131107_164828

20131107_164756

La seconda stanza del negozio, invece, è dedicata ad altri tipi di collezionismo e di esigenze di mercato. Qui troverete anticaglie di ogni tipo, strumenti medici, fotografie di epoca vittoriana, addobbi funerari, cartoline originali dei freakshow, vecchie macchine fotografiche. Uno scuro armadio svetta in un angolo, colmo di repliche in resina di teschi umani. È anche la stanza dedicata alla gioielleria, tutta ovviamente a tema gotico; alcuni degli ornamenti in esposizione contengono autentiche parti di animali, come i pendagli con testa di pipistrello, gli orecchini con osso di pene di visone, o le spille con feto di topo. È fin troppo facile il sospetto che Necromance sopravviva proprio grazie al commercio di questo tipo di bigiotteria, piuttosto che con i pezzi più “seri” come ad esempio i calchi anatomici in gesso di fine ‘800.

20131107_164955

20131107_164910

20131107_164939

20131107_164927

20131107_165005

20131107_165014

20131107_165042

20131107_165052

20131107_165135

20131107_165309

20131107_165344

Nonostante un negozio simile non possa certo vantare la popolarità dei suoi concorrenti su Melrose Avenue che vendono scintillanti abiti alla moda, riesce comunque a mantenere i prezzi notevolmente bassi per il genere di oggetti da collezione che propone, e senza dubbio questo è il suo maggiore punto di forza.

20131107_165358

20131107_160304

20131107_160350

Ecco il sito ufficiale di Necromance.

Londonscopia

Articolo a cura del nostro inviato speciale a Londra, il guestblogger ipnosarcoma.

Benvenuti a quella che sarà la prima puntata di una lunga serie che è probabilmente già finita con questo articolo. Il titolo di questa non-rubrica si riferisce alla volontà di sondare in profondità le pareti interne dell’apparato digerente di Londra, al fine di verificarne eventuali masse tumorali.

Per questa puntata di una serie nata morta, andremo a esplorare le cavità del borough di Hackney, nell’East End. In particolare, dietro segnalazione di una persona dalla dubbia moralità (moralità? non offendiamo. NdR), mi accingerò a parlarvi di una piccola bottega degli orrori e delle meraviglie situata al numero 11 di Mare Street, a metà strada tra le stazioni di Hackney Central e Bethnal Green, ai confini quindi con il borough di Tower Hamlets.

P1000340

P1000342

Il posto si chiama “The Last Tuesday Society”. Sulla vetrata dell’ingresso si può leggere: Those easily offended by death and decay should stay away . Hanno ragione. Se non vi piace vedere la morte e la decomposizione della materia organica dovreste tenervene alla larga e rimanere a casa. A vedere a ripetizione Cannibal Holocaust. Appena sotto una targhetta recita: This is not a brothel, there are no prostitutes at this address (“Questo non è un bordello, non ci sono prostitute a questo indirizzo”). Lo stesso avvertimento che si poteva leggere sulla porta d’ingresso della casa di Sebastian Horsley. Parleremo più avanti di costui. D’accordo, questo cartello diminuisce l’offerta, ma in ogni caso non ci dissuade, la promessa di esplorare un mondo “exotic, erotic & necrotic” è troppo allettante. Entriamo.

L’ingresso (riservato solo ai maggiori di 21 anni) non è gratuito, se si è intenzionati a varcare la soglia del primo spazio, dedicato all’allegro shopping, per accedere all’inconscio collettivo rimosso e riposto con cura nel piccolo museo all’interno. Due pound per entrare e fare qualche misera fotarella di straforo, cinque se vuoi bullarti con gli amici scrivendo un articolo su Bizzarro Bazar e scattare foto a iosa. Pago ed entro. Ne vale la pena.

P1000259

P1000332

P1000266

P1000263

P1000262

P1000271

Le prime cose che rimangono impresse: gli animali impagliati. E non stiamo parlando dei soliti animali impagliati. Parliamo di autentiche iene, orsi, pipistrelli, gatti, cani e uccelli di varie dimensioni e razze. Questo per quanto riguarda gli animali meno inquietanti: basta fare pochi passi per vedere molto di più.

P1000260

P1000274

P1000283

P1000319

P1000338

P1000336

P1000334

Caprette a due teste. Talpe a due teste. Enormi roditori. Gatti volanti con grandi ali innestate. Teste di varano, di quelli giganti. E altro ancora. Ah, appena scendete le scale per arrivare alle due sale inferiori, non dimenticate di buttare un occhio (che poi conserveranno amorevolmente sotto formalina) al reparto delle offerte: in questo periodo hanno una selezione di pellicce scontate al 50%. Dopodiché, potrete tranquillamente usare la vostra tessera di Greenpeace come stuzzicadenti, per togliervi dalle gengive quei fastidiosi rimasugli di carne animale.

P1000273

P1000331ù P1000284

P1000286

Fra fenicotteri, teschi di uccelli di specie varie, ossi fossili d’orso (autenticati, a quanto dicono), tartarughe e armadilli, teste umane mozze e insanguinate (finte, mica sono pervertiti qui) che non trovereste neanche nel cassetto delle mutande di Tom Savini, e serpenti conservati in barattoli di marmellata, si arriva ad autentiche chicche del posto.

P1000313

P1000314

P1000310

P1000307

P1000306

P1000290

P1000289

P1000288

Ad esempio, i cimeli legati alla controversa figura del succitato, sovraeccitato, Sebastian Horsley, al quale dedicherò un articolo che comparirà su Donna Moderna di un mese qualsiasi. Artista perverso e controverso, noto puttaniere orgoglioso di ciò, a sua volta collezionista di stravaganze da tutto il mondo, sperimentatore di un’autentica crocefissione senza ricorrere a nessun genere di anestetico, morto di overdose di speedball. Qui abbiamo l’onore di poter vedere diversi oggetti a lui appartenuti come, ad esempio, le sue scarpe vittoriane, i suoi occhiali da sole psichedelici color rapa rossa, e la siringa con cui si è iniettato la dose che lo ha portato alla morte nel suo appartamento a Soho. Pace all’anima sua, se mai ne ha avuta una. Ma andiamo avanti.

P1000317

P1000294

P1000295

In un’altra vetrina possiamo ammirare un autentico baculum di tricheco, che poi non è altro che l’osso del pene del suddetto animale. Se volete potete acquistarlo: niente dice “ti amo” come un articolo degenere del genere, anche se, ahimè, San Valentino è ormai passato.

P1000299

P1000304

P1000296

P1000297

Non lontano entriamo nel campo del mito: preziosamente incorniciato, possiamo ammirare il dito indice mummificato di Pancho Villa. La leggenda vuole che la sua testa sia stata trafugata dalla tomba da un certo Capitano Emil L. Holmdahl per venderla a un eccentrico milionario. Già che c’erano, al noto rivoluzionario è stato asportato un dito, a lungo usato dalla popolazione messicana come reliquia. Un po’ come il Sacro Prepuzio di Gesù, sul quale non mi dilungherò per riverenza e per necessità di sintesi (e perché ne abbiamo già parlato in questo articolo, NdR).

P1000330

P1000309

P1000324

P1000328

D’accordo, mi fermo qui, molte cose le vedrete nelle foto, altre vi invito ad andare a vederle di persona quando visiterete Londra. Da segnalare alcuni preziosi libri che si possono ammirare, fra i quali ho il piacere di ricordare: Oral sadism and the vegetarian personality, What to say when you talk to your self e Sex instructions for Irish farmers, il quale però, con mio disappunto, si riferisce al sesso fra gli animali e non con il fattore – niente romanticismi alla Vase de noche, meglio conosciuto ai fan come The pig fucking movie. Altre chicche da non perdere: la cacca in barattolo di alcune celebrità (sono aperte le donazioni), fra cui quella di Kylie Minogue e niente meno che quella di Amy Winehouse, che pare aver raggiunto ora quotazioni da capogiro. Avrete il coraggio di esaminarne l’autenticità?

P1000280

Ma il reperto per me più commovente è il foglio firmato da Maria de Silva. Sono sicuro che non ne avrete sentito parlare, perché probabilmente anche i suoi parenti faranno fatica a ricordarsi di lei. Maria è (era?) l’inserviente presso un certo Hill Club, e ci ha rilasciato una dichiarazione autografa che recita, in calligrafia tremolante: “Io, Maria de Silva, ho lavorato al Hill Club il 22 Agosto 2003, ho pulito la stanza usata dai Rolling Stones e ho trovato questi preservativi e questo Viagara”. Non Viagra, Viagara. E naturalmente, nella vetrina dedicata, possiamo ammirare il barattolo contenente i preservativi e la confezione di Viagra menzionati. È questo che più ci fa amare questo posto: come nella migliore tradizione delle wunderkammer, dei freakshow e degli exploitation movies che ci hanno fatto battere il cuore quando eravamo adolescenti, non è la veridicità a contare, è il tasto dell’inconscio che viene premuto. Consigliato a tutti i lettori di Bizzarro Bazar. Ricordatevi, però, che il negozio è aperto esclusivamente di sabato, dalle 12 alle 19, oppure su appuntamento. Per i dettagli vi rimando al sito ufficiale.

P1000303

Bizzarro Bazar a New York – II

Come resistere alla tentazione dello shopping a New York, quando la città si riveste di luci natalizie e le vetrine dei negozi divengono delle vere e proprie opere d’arte? In questo secondo, ed ultimo, post sulla Grande Mela ci occupiamo quindi di negozi – ma se vi aspettate che vi parliamo di Tiffany o di Macy’s, siete fuori strada.

Da quando Maxilla & Mandible ha chiuso i battenti (senza avvertire nessuno – sul sito nemmeno un cenno al fatto che il negozio è dismesso) sono poche le botteghe ancora aperte che possono offrire oggetti da collezione naturalistica: Evolution Store è però la punta di diamante di questo strano tipo di esercizio.

Uno scheletro sull’uscio ci avverte del tono generale del negozio, e la vetrina già lascia a bocca aperta: kapala istoriati, teschi di feti umani disposti secondo l’età raggiunta in utero, grandi pavoni impagliati. Non ci sono vie di mezzo – o alzate gli occhi al cielo e proseguite per la vostra strada, o vi fiondate oltre la porta d’ingresso.

All’interno, la cornucopia di oggetti assale i sensi. Ci sono scheletri e teschi di animali di ogni specie, tutti in vendita, esemplari tassidermici, altri sotto alcol, ninnoli e portachiavi ricavati da ossa autentiche. Insomma, troverete il regalo di Natale giusto per chiunque.

E per i vostri bambini più indisciplinati quest’anno, al posto del solito vecchio carbone, Babbo Natale potrebbe lasciare sotto l’albero una nuova sorpresa: leccalecca con scorpioni e altri insetti incorporati.

Al piano superiore i titolari espongono i pezzi di maggior valore della loro collezione. Spicca una serie di scheletri umani, di cui uno femminile che ospita nel grembo uno scheletro fetale fissato in posizione di gravidanza. E poi ancora maschere tribali, teste rimpicciolite, uova di dinosauro, pietre preziose, animali impagliati o essiccati, fossili, coralli, farfalle multicolori e insetti esotici.

I prezzi non sono sempre popolari, ma nemmeno esorbitanti, e variano considerevolmente a seconda delle vostre esigenze. Comunque, se non volete spendere troppo, gli impiegati e i gestori del negozio, tutti accomunati dalla classica gentilezza newyorkese, saranno più che felici di impacchettarvi uno squalo sotto alcol (solo $29) o l’osso del pene di qualche mammifero ($6).

Sbucando con la metro all’East Village si entra in una dimensione totalmente diversa. Le foglie in questa stagione si fanno gialle e risaltano sulle pareti in mattoni e fra le scale antincendio esterne, che abbiamo visto in innumerevoli film. Qui, dalle parti di Cooper Union, c’è St. Mark’s Place, una stradina dedicata ai tatuaggi, ai piercing e all’abbigliamento punk e glam. Residuati della no-future generation, ormai cinquantenni ma ancora orgogliosamente imborchiati e dai (radi) capelli dipinti, gestiscono piccoli negozi di oggettistica e fashion. Anche se non siete tipi da creste e catene, vi consigliamo comunque di farvi un giro all’interno del negozio di vintage e usato Search & Destroy – se non altro per dare un’occhiata al delirante allestimento del negozio.

Qui i vestiti sono quasi nascosti da un’accozzaglia di giocattoli, props e collectibles: e se all’entrata siete salutati da bambole con la maschera antigas, modellini anatomici e feti deformi in gomma, all’interno i toni si fanno ancora più splatter. Un finto maiale sgozzato a grandezza naturale è appeso al soffitto, dal quale penzola anche un manichino fetish in posizione di bondage. Un flipper sta vicino a maschere di carnevale di mostri iperrealistici e sanguinosi. Ovunque manichini in pose oscene e, particolare non trascurabile, dalle parti genitali correttamente rappresentate. Purtroppo i gestori orientali sono (giustamente) gelosi del loro arredamento e ci permettono di scattare soltanto qualche foto.

Poco più avanti, sempre qui all’East Village, sulla decima strada, si trova uno dei negozi più celebri: si tratta di Obscura Antiques & Oddities.

Da quando Obscura è al centro di una serie televisiva di Discovery Channel (di cui vi avevamo parlato in questo articolo), il piccolo spazio espositivo è perennemente affollato. E la gente compra, il giro di affari è in stabile crescita e di conseguenza la collezione è in continuo cambiamento.

Obscura è l’analogo newyorkese del nostro Nautilus, anche se gli manca quella maniacale e coreografica cura espositiva che Alessandro ha donato alla sua bottega delle meraviglie. D’altronde Mike ci racconta che stanno per trasferirsi in uno spazio più grande, dove finalmente la collezione potrà evitare di essere accatastata e un po’ disordinata com’è adesso. Comunque sia, i pezzi sono davvero straordinari e l’atmosfera unica.

Fra tutti spicca la testa mummificata divenuta un po’ il simbolo di Obscura, tanto da farne delle minuscole repliche per portachiavi.

Ma le sorprese sono tante, e fra scheletri umani, strani animali, oggetti di antiquariato medico e bizzarrie in tutto e per tutto ascrivibili alla tradizione denominata Americana, si potrebbe perdere una buona oretta a curiosare.

Mike ed Evan, la strana coppia di proprietari, sono fra le persone più gentili e disponibili del mondo, talmente colti e appassionati che è una goduria anche solo rimanere ad ascoltarli mentre rispondono alle domande più stravaganti dei clienti. Il giro di collezionismo legato ad Obscura è impressionante, ma di certo anche voi riuscirete a trovare almeno un regalino per chi, fra i vostri conoscenti, ha già davvero tutto.

Bizzarro Bazar a New York – I

New York, Novembre 2011. È notte. Il vento gelido frusta le guance, s’intrufola fra i grattacieli e scende sulle strade in complicati vortici, senza che si possa prevedere da che parte arriverà la prossima sferzata. Anche le correnti d’aria sono folli ed esagerate, qui a Times Square, dove il tramonto non esiste, perché i maxischermi e le insegne brillanti degli spettacoli on-Broadway non lasciano posto alle ombre. Le basse temperature e il forte vento non fermano però il vostro esploratore del bizzarro, che con la scusa di una settimana nella Grande Mela, ha deciso di accompagnarvi alla scoperta di alcuni dei negozi e dei musei più stravaganti di New York.

Partiamo proprio da qui, da Times Square, dove un’insegna luminosa attira lo sguardo del curioso, promettendo meraviglie: si tratta del museo Ripley’s – Believe It Or Not!, una delle più celebri istituzioni mondiali del weird, che conta decine di sedi in tutto il mondo. Proudly freakin’ out families for 90 years! (“Spaventiamo le famiglie, orgogliosamente, da 90 anni”), declama uno dei cartelloni animati.

L’idea di base del Ripley’s sta proprio in quel “credici, oppure no”: si tratta di un museo interamente dedicato allo strano, al deviante, al macabro e all’incredibile. Ad ogni nuovo pezzo in esposizione sembra quasi che il museo ci sfidi a comprendere se sia tutto vero o se si tratti una bufala. Se volete sapere la risposta, beh, la maggior parte delle sorprendenti e incredibili storie raccontate durante la visita sono assolutamente vere. Scopriamo quindi le reali dimensioni dei nani e dei giganti più celebri, vediamo vitelli siamesi e giraffe albine impagliate, fotografie e storie di freak celebri.

Ma il tono ironico e fieramente “exploitation” di questa prima parte di museo lascia ben presto il posto ad una serie di reperti ben più seri e spettacolari; le sezioni antropologiche diventano via via più impressionanti, alternando vetrine con armi arcaiche a pezzi decisamente più macabri, come quelli che adornano le sale dedicate alle shrunken heads (le teste umane rimpicciolite dai cacciatori tribali del Sud America), o ai meravigliosi kapala tibetani.

Tutto ciò che può suscitare stupore trova posto nelle vetrine del museo: dalla maschera funeraria di Napoleone Bonaparte, alla pistola minuscola ma letale che si indossa come un anello, alle microsculture sulle punte di spillo.

Talvolta è la commistione di buffoneria carnevalesca e di inaspettata serietà a colpire lo spettatore. Ad esempio, in una pacchiana sala medievaleggiante, che propone alcuni strumenti di tortura in “azione” su ridicoli manichini, troviamo però una sedia elettrica d’epoca (vera? ricostruita?) e perfino una testa umana sezionata (questa indiscutibilmente vera). Il tutto per il giubilo dei bambini, che al Ripley’s accorrono a frotte, e per la perplessità dei genitori che, interdetti, non sanno più se hanno fatto davvero bene a portarsi dietro la prole.

Insomma, quello che resta maggiormente impresso del Ripley’s – Believe It Or Not è proprio questa furba commistione di ciarlataneria e scrupolo museale, che mira a confondere e strabiliare lo spettatore, lasciandolo frastornato e meravigliato.

Per tornare unpo’ con i piedi per terra, eccoci quindi a un museo più “serio” e “ufficiale”, ma di certo non più sobrio. Si tratta del celeberrimo American Museum of Natural History, uno dei musei di storia naturale più grandi del mondo – quello, per intenderci, in cui passava una notte movimentata Ben Stiller in una delle sue commedie di maggior successo.

Una giornata intera basta appena per visitare tutte le sale e per soffermarsi velocemente sulle varie sezioni scientifiche che meriterebbero ben più attenzione.

Oltre alle molte sale dedicate all’antropologia paleoamericana (ricostruzioni accurate degli utensili e dei costumi dei nativi, ecc.), il museo offre mostre stagionali in continuo rinnovo, una sala IMAX per la proiezione di filmati di interesse scientifico, un’impressionante sezione astronomica, diverse sale dedicate alla paleontologia e all’evoluzione dell’uomo, e infine la celebre sezione dedicata ai dinosauri (una delle più complete al mondo, amata alla follia dai bambini).

Ma forse i veri gioielli del museo sono due in particolare: il primo è costituito dall’ampio uso di splendidi diorami, in cui gli animali impagliati vengono inseriti all’interno di microambienti ricreati ad arte. Che si tratti di mammiferi africani, asiatici o americani, oppure ancora di animali marini, questi tableaux sono accurati fin nel minimo dettaglio per dare un’idea di spontanea vitalità, e da una vetrina all’altra ci si immerge in luoghi distanti, come se fossimo all’interno di un attimo raggelato, di fronte ad alcuni degli esemplari tassidermic