The premature babies of Coney Island

Once upon a time on the circus or carnival midway, among the smell of hot dogs and the barkers’ cries, spectators could witness some amazing side attractions, from fire-eaters to bearded ladies, from electric dancers to the most exotic monstrosities (see f.i. some previous posts here and here).
Beyond our fascination for a time of naive wonder, there is another less-known reason for which we should be grateful to old traveling fairs: among the readers who are looking at this page right now, almost one out of ten is alive thanks to the sideshows.

This is the strange story of how amusement parks, and a visionary doctor’s stubbornness, contributed to save millions of human lives.

Until the end of XIX Century, premature babies had little or no chance of survival. Hospitals did not have neonatal units to provide efficient solutions to the problem, so the preemies were given back to their parents to be taken home — practically, to die. In all evidence, God had decided that those babies were not destined to survive.
In 1878 a famous Parisian obstetrician, Dr. Étienne Stéphane Tarnier, visited an exhibition called Jardin d’Acclimatation which featured, among other displays, a new method for hatching poultry in a controlled, hydraulic heated environment, invented by a Paris Zoo keeper; immediately the doctor thought he could test that same system on premature babies and commissioned a similar box, which allowed control of the temperature of the newborn’s environment.
After the first positive experimentations at the Maternity Hospital in Paris, the incubator was soon equipped with a bell that rang whenever the temperature went too high.
The doctor’s assistant, Pierre Budin, further developed the Tarnier incubator, on one hand studying how to isolate and protect the frail newborn babies from infectious disease, and on the other the correct quantities and methods of alimentation.

Despite the encouraging results, the medical community still failed to recognize the usefulness of incubators. This skepticism mainly stemmed from a widespread mentality: as mentioned before, the common attitude towards premature babies was quite fatalist, and the death of weaker infants was considered inevitable since the most ancient times.

Thus Budin decided to send his collaborator, Dr. Martin Couney, to the 1896 World Exhibition in Berlin. Couney, our story’s true hero, was an uncommon character: besides his knowledge as an obstetrician, he had a strong charisma and true showmanship; these virtues would prove fundamental for the success of his mission, as we shall see.
Couney, with the intent of creating a bit of a fuss in order to better spread the news, had the idea of exhibiting live premature babies inside his incubators. He had the nerve to ask Empress Augusta Victoria herself for permission to use some infants from the Charity Hospital in Berlin. He was granted the favor, as the newborn babies were destined to a certain death anyway.
But none of the infants lodged inside the incubators died, and Couney’s exhibition, called Kinderbrutanstalt (“child hatchery”) immediately became the talk of the town.

This success was repeated the following year in London, at Earl’s Court Exhibition (scoring 3600 visitors each day), and in 1898 at the Trans-Mississippi Exhibition in Omaha, Nebraska. In 1900 he came back to Paris for the World Exhibition, and in 1901 he attended the Pan-American Exhibition in Buffalo, NY.

L'edificio costruito per gli incubatori a Buffalo.

The incubators building in Buffalo.

The incubators at the Buffalo Exhibition.

But in the States Couney met an even stronger resistence to accept this innovation, let alone implementing it in hospitals.
It must be stressed that although he was exhibiting a medical device, inside the various fairs his incubator stand was invariably (and much to his disappointment) confined to the entertainment section rather than the scientific section.
Maybe this was the reason why in 1903 Couney took a courageous decision.

If Americans thought incubators were just some sort of sideshow stunt, well then, he would give them the entertainment they wanted. But they would have to pay for it.

Infant-Incubators-building-at-1901-Pan-American-Exposition

Baby_incubator_exhibit,_A-Y-P,_1909

Couney definitively moved to New York, and opened a new attraction at Coney Island amusement park. For the next 40 years, every summer, the doctor exhibited premature babies in his incubators, for a quarter dollar. Spectators flowed in to contemplate those extremely underweight babies, looking so vulnerable and delicate as they slept in their temperate glass boxes. “Oh my, look how tiny!“, you could hear the crowd uttering, as people rolled along the railing separating them from the aisle where the incubators were lined up.

 

In order to accentuate the minuscule size of his preemies, Couney began resorting to some tricks: if the baby wasn’t small enough, he would add more blankets around his little body, to make him look tinier. Madame Louise Recht, a nurse who had been by Couney’s side since the very first exhibitions in Paris, from time to time would slip her ring over the babies’ hands, to demonstrate how thin their wrists were: but in reality the ring was oversized even for the nurse’s fingers.

Madame Louise Recht con uno dei neonati.

Madame Louise Recht with a newborn baby.

Preemie wearing on his wrist the nurse’s sparkler.

Couney’s enterprise, which soon grew into two separate incubation centers (one in Luna Park and the other in Dreamland), could seem quite cynical today. But it actually was not.
All the babies hosted in his attractions had been turned down by city hospitals, and given back to the parents who had no hope of saving them; the “Doctor Incubator” promised families that he would treat the babies without any expense on their part, as long as he could exhibit the preemies in public. The 25 cents people paid to see the newborn babies completely covered the high incubation and feeding expenses, even granting a modest profit to Couney and his collaborators. This way, parents had a chance to see their baby survive without paying a cent, and Couney could keep on raising awareness about the importance and effectiveness of his method.
Couney did not make any race distinction either, exhibiting colored babies along with white babies — an attitude that was quite rare at the beginning of the century in America. Among the “guests” displayed in his incubators, was at one point Couney’s own premature daughter, Hildegarde, who later became a nurse and worked with her father on the attraction.

Nurses with babies at Flushing World Fair, NY. At the center is Couney’s daughter, Hildegarde.

Besides his two establishments in Coney Island (one of which was destroyed during the 1911 terrible Dreamland fire), Couney continued touring the US with his incubators, from Chicago to St. Louis, to San Francisco.
In forty years, he treated around 8000 babies, and saved at least 6500; but his endless persistence in popularizing the incubator had much lager effects. His efforts, on the long run, contributed to the opening of the first neonatal intensive care units, which are now common in hospitals all around the world.

After a peak in popularity during the first decades of the XX Century, at the end of the 30s the success of Couney’s incubators began to decrease. It had become an old and trite attraction.
When the first premature infant station opened at Cornell’s New York Hospital in 1943, Couney told his nephew: “my work is done“. After 40 years of what he had always considered propaganda for a good cause, he definitively shut down his Coney Island enterprise.

Martin Arthur Couney (1870–1950).

The majority of information in this post comes from the most accurate study on the subject, by Dr. William A. Silverman (Incubator-Baby Side Shows, Pediatrics, 1979).

(Thanks, Claudia!)

A love that would not die – III

evergreens-cemetery-bushwick-brooklyn-nyc

In the past years we have already delved into love stories that surpass the barrier of death (the case of Carl Tanzler and a similar story which took place in Vietnam).
Perhaps less macabre than these other two incidents, but just as moving, was Jonathan Reed’s passion for his wife Mary E. Gould Reed.

When Mary died, she was buried in her father’s crypt, at the Evergreens Cemetery in Brooklyn. But Jonathan, who then was in his sixties, could not abandon his wife. He kept telling himself that maybe, by showing her his unconditional love, things could go on like before.
His visits to her grave began to be judged excessively frequent, even for a grieving widower who, as a retired businessman, had plenty of free time. As the neighbors began to murmur, Mary’s father asked Reed to behave in a more discreet manner: he therefore reduced his apparitions at the graveyard. But when his father-in-law passed away, for Jonathan there were no more obstacles.

thevergreensviewtonyc

He bought a new mausoleum in another section of the cemetery in which he transferred his dead wife’s body. Beside Mary’s casket he positioned a second empty one, where he himself would be lying when time came to join her.
Eventually Jonathan moved into the crypt.

He took some domestic furniture to the vestibule of the tomb, and hung a clock to the funeral cell wall; he equipped the mausoleum with a potbelly stove, complete with chimney tubes carrying the smoke out through the roof. He decided to decorate the small room with all the things Mary loved – flower pots, picture showing her at different ages, fine paintings on the walls, her last half-finished knitting – and even found place inside the tomb for their pets, a parrot and a squirrel.

a98582_grave_8-lived-alived

Jonathan Reed’s routine knew no variation. He came to the cemetery when gates opened, at six o’clock in the morning, entered the mausoleum and lit the fire. He then went up to Mary’s coffin, which he had especially equipped with a small window, at eye level, that he could open: through that peephole he could see his wife, and talk to her. “Good morning Mary, I have come to sit with you”, was his morning greeting.
Jonathan spent his whole day in there, chatting with his wife as if she could hear him, telling her the latest news, reading books to her. The he would dine in their wedding china. After lunch, he would pull out a deck of cards and play some game with Mary, laying down the cards for her.
Whenever he wanted some fresh air, he sat before the entrance in a rocking chair: he looked just like a classic old man on his front porch, always politely saying hello to whoever was passing by.
At six o’clock in the evening the cemetery closed and he was forced to leave, after wishing his Mary goodnight.

8656545137_35728e781d_b

This strange character quickly became a small celebrity in the district. Some said he could communicate with the afterworld. Come said he was crazy. Some said he was convinced that his wife would wake up sooner or later, and he wanted to be the first person for Mary to see when she came back. Some said he developed complicated theories about the “heat”that would bring her back to life.
The story of the widower who refused to leave his wife’s grave appeared in several short pieces even on international press, and litlle by little a curious crowd began to show up every day. In his first year as a resident at Evergreens some 7000 people came to greet him. Many women, it is said, intended to “save” him from his obsession, but he always kindly replied that his heart belonged to Mary. According to the reports, Reed even received the visit of seven Buddhist monks from Burma, who were convinced that he might have acquired some secret knowledge on the afterlife. Jonathan had to disappoint them, confessing he was just there to be close to his wife.

The everyday life of Evergreens Cemetery’s most famous resident went on undisturbed for ten years, until on March 23, 1905, he was found unconscious on the mausoleum’s floor, in cardiac arrest. Jonathan Reed was transferred to Kings County Hospital, where he died some days later, aged seventy. He was buried in the grave he had spent the last decade of his life in, beside his wife.

reedstomb

An article on the New York Times claimed that “Mr. Reed could never be made to believe that his wife was really dead, his explanation for her condition being that the warmth had simply left her body and that if he kept the mausoleum warm she would continue to sleep peacefully in the costly metallic casket in which her remains were put. Friends often visited him in the tomb, and although they at first tried to convince him that his wife was really dead, they long ago gave up that argument, and have for years humored the whims of the old man”.
The article on the Brooklyn Daily Eagle, which appeared the very day of his admission at the hospital. had a similar tone; the author once again described Reed as obsessed by the idea of keeping Mary’s body warm, even if it was noted that “in spite of this remarkable eccentricity in regard to his dead wife, Mr. Reed is in other respects an unusually intelligent and interesting man. He converses on all subjects with a degree of knowledge and insight rare to a person of his age. It is only upon the subject of death that he appears to be at all deranged”.

Clearly, the story the papers loved to tell was one about denial of grief, about a man who rejected the very idea of death, too painful to accept; what was appealing was the figure of a romantic, crazy man, stubbornly convinced that not all was lost, and that his Beauty might still come back to life.
And it could well be that in his last years the elderly man had somewhat lost touch with reality.

But maybe, beyond all legends, rumors and colorful newspaper articles, Reed’s choice had a much simpler motivation: he and Mary had been deeply in love. And when a relationship comes to be the only really important thing in life, it also becomes an indispensable crutch, without which one feels completely lost.
In 1895, the first year he spent in the cemetery, Jonathan Reed replied to a Brooklyn Daily Eagle interviewer with these words: “My wife was a remarkable woman and our lives were blended into one. When she died, I had no ambition but to cherish her memory. My only pleasure is to sit here with all that is left of her”.

No whacky theories in this interview, nor the belief that Mary could come back from the grave. Simply, a man who was sure he couldn’t find happiness away from the woman he loved.

18lqz61mdtfgcjpg

La metro pneumatica di NYC

Nel 1912 gli operai della Degnon Contracting Company, mentre scavavano il nuovo tunnel della metropolitana sotto Broadway, a New York, videro crollare la parete che stavano forando, e di fronte a loro si aprì una vasta oscurità. Una volta entrati attraverso il grande buco, le loro torce illuminarono un’enorme sala decorata sfarzosamente: lampadari a gas, divanetti e poltrone, dipinti alle pareti e pannelli affrescati erano ormai ingrigiti da uno spesso strato di polvere. Poco più in là, uno strano vagone cilindrico era poggiato sui binari che sparivano in un buio tunnel. Era la stazione della metropolitana pneumatica di Beach, ancora intatta dopo più di 40 anni.

Oggi Beach è una figura quasi dimenticata dalla storia ufficiale, destino tipico di chi è troppo avanti rispetto ai suoi tempi. Nella seconda metà dell’800 il traffico a New York era divenuto congestionato ed invivibile; la città era in mano al corrotto sindaco William “Boss” Tweed, che essendo ammanicato con tutte le maggiori compagnie ferroviarie del tempo non aveva alcun interesse a cambiare lo stato delle cose. Più il traffico aumentava e diventava caotico, più gente avrebbe preso il treno per spostarsi.

Alfred_Ely_Beach
È qui che entra in gioco Alfred Ely Beach. Figlio di un editore importante, seguì le orme di suo padre e, da sempre affascinato dalla tecnologia, assieme a un amico rilevò la testata Scientific American, sull’orlo del fallimento. La trovata geniale di Beach, per risollevare le sorti della rivista, fu quella di aprire un ufficio brevetti nello stesso palazzo: in questo modo egli aveva accesso alle più recenti invenzioni e innovazioni prima di chiunque altro, e pubblicava così sullo Scientific American dei resoconti in anteprima sugli ultimi ritrovati tecnologici.

Era egli stesso un inventore, e brevettò una macchina da scrivere per ciechi. Ma quello che lo affascinava di più era l’ambito dei trasporti. I sistemi pneumatici, in particolare, l’avevano colpito alle varie fiere internazionali (come ad esempio all’American Institute Fair del 1867). Secondo lui si sarebbero potuti applicare a un mezzo di trasporto metropolitano sotterraneo. Ma la sua voglia di sperimentare questo nuovo e rivoluzionario metodo si scontrò fin da subito con gli interessi del sindaco “Boss” Tweed, che fece pressioni affinché ogni nuova proposta di Beach venisse rifiutata nelle assemblee legislative della città di New York.

Infine, avendo avuto l’autorizzazione a creare un piccolo servizio di posta pneumatica nei dintorni del municipio, ma sapendo che gli scagnozzi di “Boss Tweed” gli sarebbero stati sul collo, aspettando di coglierlo in fallo non appena si fosse rotta una tubatura, Beach decise di aggirare il problema, e agire per conto suo, di nascosto, realizzando un’opera incredibile. I suoi operai erano tenuti al silenzio. Sotto un piccolo e anonimo negozio di vestiti, sacchi pieni di terriccio venivano portati fuori a notte fonda, senza che nessuno se ne accorgesse.

Advancing the shield - interior of the tunnel-inkbluesky

Era infatti stata assemblata nella cantina del negozio una grande ruota escavatrice, di progettazione dello stesso Beach, che estraeva il terriccio durante la perforazione. Senza che nessuno a New York se ne rendesse conto, due stazioni metropolitane erano state costruite, collegate fra loro da una linea di metropolitana pneumatica: il tunnel rotondo si adattava perfettamente al vagone, anch’esso cilindrico. Una gigantesca ventola proiettava il vagone in avanti verso la seconda stazione, e se fatta girare al contrario, lo risucchiava indietro. Quello che davvero rendeva quest’opera temeraria era il fatto che il tunnel correva sotto al municipio, direttamente sotto alle terga di “Boss” Tweed, senza che lui se ne fosse reso conto, per dimostrare in maniera eclatante che una simile soluzione non solo era possibile, ma era già realtà.

subway
Il 26 febbraio 1870 venne tenuta una misteriosa inaugurazione, di fronte a decine di giornalisti ignari di cosa stessero per vedere. Possiamo soltanto immaginare la loro sorpresa quando, fatti entrare nel retro del negozio di vestiti e dopo aver sceso la botola del seminterrato, si trovarono di fronte a una lussuosa sala d’attesa. E ancora più impensabile dev’essere stata la loro sorpresa nello scoprire il vagone e provare l’ebbrezza di essere trasportati in pochi minuti da un getto d’aria per centinaia di metri nel sottosuolo, lungo un singolo tratto di binari fino ad un’altra, identica e ugualmente sfarzosa stazione metro. Stiamo parlando del 1870: e quello di Beach era un treno senza guidatore, senza locomotiva, sotterraneo, in un’epoca in cui la gente ogni giorno si muoveva ancora a cavallo o in carrozza.

thumbs_1508-Picture_3

beach-map

Interior of the passenger car-inkbluesky
Alcuni di loro compresero benissimo quello che Beach era riuscito a realizzare proprio sotto il naso di “Boss” Tweed.
L’inventore aveva osato sfidare il sindaco più corrotto che New York avesse mai conosciuto, il cui nome ancora oggi è sinonimo di clientelismo e assenza di scrupoli, costruendo una linea non autorizzata che passava proprio sotto al municipio: nonostante l’entusiasmo della stampa e dei cittadini, chiaramente Beach aveva le ore contate. E infatti poco dopo Tweed riuscì a convincere un esperto, che ovviamente era sul suo libro paga, a stilare un resoconto dai toni apocalittici, che prevedeva catastrofi e disagi enormi nell’eventualità della costruzione di una metropolitana pneumatica nella città. Anche la fortuna di “Boss” Tweed sarebbe tramontata presto, ma nel frattempo la legge che avrebbe consentito a Bleach di scavare la sua metropolitana venne bloccata da un magistrato assoldato da Tweed, e gli innovativi progetti di Bleach si arenarono.

fiftyyears123
Quando, quarant’anni dopo, gli operai riesumarono le due vecchie stazioni, tutto giaceva come era stato lasciato: il vagone, i lampadari, la tappezzeria. La scavatrice di Bleach, un’enorme ruota di legno e metallo, era ancora al suo posto, e si disintegrò appena venne toccata. Se oggi si scoprisse un luogo del genere, verrebbe certamente preservato come un museo; ma all’epoca la sensibilità non era la stessa, e la stazione venne demolita per lasciare il passo alla nuova, moderna metro elettrica.

I fratelli Collyer

Langley Collyer

Figli di un ginecologo di prestigio e di una cantante d’opera, i fratelli Collyer, Homer e Langley, sono divenuti nel tempo figure iconiche di New York a causa della loro vita eccentrica e della loro tragica fine: purtroppo la sindrome a cui hanno involontariamente dato il nome non è affatto rara, e pare anzi sia in lenta ma costante crescita soprattutto nelle grandi città.

Nati alla fine dell’ ‘800, fin da ragazzi i due fratelli dimostrano spiccate doti che lasciano prospettare una vita di successo: dall’intelligenza acuta e vispa, si iscrivono entrambi alla Columbia University e guadagnano il diploma – Langley in ingegneria e Homer in diritto nautico. Homer è anche un eccellente pianista e si esibisce al Carnegie Hall, ma abbandona la carriera di musicista abbastanza presto, in seguito alle prime critiche negative. Langley sfrutta le sue conoscenze ingegneristiche per brevettare alcuni marchingegni che però non hanno successo.


Fin dal 1909 i Collyer vivono con i genitori ad Harlem: all’epoca si trattava di un quartiere “in“, a prevalenza bianca, in cui risiedevano molti professionisti altolocati e grossi nomi della finanza e dello spettacolo. Ma nel 1919 il padre Herman abbandona la famiglia e si trasferisce in un’altra casa: morirà quattro anni più tardi. La madre dei due fratelli muore invece nel 1929.

Harlem in quel periodo sta cambiando volto, da zona residenziale sta divenendo un quartiere decisamente malfamato. I fratelli Collyer, rimasti orfani, reagiscono a questo cambiamento facendosi sempre più reclusi, e più eccentrici. Cominciano a collezionare oggetti trovati in giro per le strade, e non gettano più l’immondizia. La loro casa al 2078 della Quinta Avenue si riempie a poco a poco degli utensili più disparati che i Collyer accatastano ovunque: giocattoli, carrozzine deformate, pezzi di violini, corde e cavi elettrici attorcigliati a pile di giornali vecchi di anni, cataste di scatoloni pieni di bicchieri rotti, cassepanche ricolme di lenzuola di ogni genere, fasci di decine di ombrelli, candelabri, pezzi di manichini, 14 pianoforti, un’intera automobile disassemblata e un’infinità di altre cianfrusaglie senza alcun valore.


Come il poeta greco dell’antichità di cui porta il nome, negli anni ’30 Homer diventa cieco. Langley, allora, decide di prendersi cura del fratello, e la vita dei due si fa ancora più misteriosa e appartata. I ragazzini tirano i sassi alle loro finestre, li chiamano “i fratelli fantasma”. Homer resta sempre sepolto in casa, all’interno della fitta rete di cunicoli praticati all’interno della spazzatura che ormai riempie la casa fino al soffitto; Langley esce di rado, per procurarsi le cento arance alla settimana che dà da mangiare al fratello nell’assurda convinzione che serviranno a ridargli la vista. Diviene sempre più ossessionato dall’idea che qualche intruso possa fare irruzione nel loro distorto, sovraffollato universo per distruggere l’intimità che si sono ritagliati: così, da buon ingegnere, costruisce tutta una serie di trappole, più o meno mortali, che dissemina e nasconde nella confusione di oggetti stipati in ogni stanza. Chiunque abbia l’ardire di entrare nel loro mondo la pagherà cara.


Eppure è proprio una di queste trappole, forse troppo bene mimetizzata, che condannerà i due fratelli Collyer. Nel Marzo del 1947, mentre sta portando la cena a Homer, strisciando attraverso un tunnel scavato nella parete di pacchi di giornale, Langley attiva per errore uno dei suoi micidiali trabocchetti: la parete di valigie e vecchie riviste gli crolla addosso, uccidendolo sul colpo. Qualche metro più in là sta seduto Homer, cieco e ormai paralizzato, impotente nell’aiutare il fratello. Morirà di fame e di arresto cardiaco qualche giorno più tardi.


La polizia, allertata da un vicino, fa irruzione nell’appartamento il 21 marzo, 10 ore dopo la morte di Homer. Ma il corpo di Langley, sepolto sotto uno strato di immondizia, non viene trovato subito e gli investigatori attribuiscono l’insopportabile odore all’immensa quantità di immondizia. Viene scatenata una caccia all’uomo nel tentativo di localizzare il fratello mancante, mentre le forze dell’ordine procedono, con estrema cautela per evitare le trappole, a svuotare a poco a poco l’appartamento.

Gli agenti, dopo quasi due settimane di ricerche fra le ben 180 tonnellate di rifiuti accumulati dai Collyer negli anni, trovano Langley l’8 aprile, mentre il cadavere è già preda dei topi.

I fratelli Collyer sono divenuti famosi perché incarnano una realtà tipicamente newyorkese: gli appartamenti sono spesso talmente piccoli, e la gente sedentaria, che il problema dei cosiddetti hoarders, cioè i collezionisti compulsivi di spazzatura, finisce spesso fuori controllo. Ma il fenomeno è tutt’altro che circoscritto alla sola Grande Mela.

Gli hoarders purtroppo esistono ovunque, anche in Italia, come vi racconterà qualsiasi vigile del fuoco. Normalmente si tratta di individui, con un’alta percentuale di anziani, costretti a una vita estremamente solitaria; la sindrome comincia con la difficoltà di liberarsi di ricordi e oggetti cari, ed è spesso acutizzata da timori di tipo finanziario. L’abitudine di “non buttar via nulla” diventa presto, per questi individui, una vera e propria fobia di essere separati dalle loro cose, anche le più inutili. Chi è affetto da questa mania spesso riempie le stanze fino ad impedire le normali funzioni per cui erano originariamente progettate: non si può più cucinare in cucina, dormire in camera da letto, e così via. L’accumulo incontrollato di cianfrusaglie rappresenta ovviamente un pericolo per sé e per gli altri, e rende difficoltose le operazioni di soccorso in caso di incendio o di altro infortunio.

La disposofobia è nota anche come sindrome di Collyer, in ricordo dei due eccentrici fratelli. Sempre in memoria di questa triste e strana storia, nel luogo dove sorgeva la loro casa c’è ora un minuscolo “pocket park”, chiamato Collyer Park.


Ecco la pagina di Wikipedia sulla disposofobia. E in questa pagina trovate una serie di fotografie di appartamenti di persone disposofobiche.

Bizzarro Bazar a New York – II

Come resistere alla tentazione dello shopping a New York, quando la città si riveste di luci natalizie e le vetrine dei negozi divengono delle vere e proprie opere d’arte? In questo secondo, ed ultimo, post sulla Grande Mela ci occupiamo quindi di negozi – ma se vi aspettate che vi parliamo di Tiffany o di Macy’s, siete fuori strada.

Da quando Maxilla & Mandible ha chiuso i battenti (senza avvertire nessuno – sul sito nemmeno un cenno al fatto che il negozio è dismesso) sono poche le botteghe ancora aperte che possono offrire oggetti da collezione naturalistica: Evolution Store è però la punta di diamante di questo strano tipo di esercizio.

Uno scheletro sull’uscio ci avverte del tono generale del negozio, e la vetrina già lascia a bocca aperta: kapala istoriati, teschi di feti umani disposti secondo l’età raggiunta in utero, grandi pavoni impagliati. Non ci sono vie di mezzo – o alzate gli occhi al cielo e proseguite per la vostra strada, o vi fiondate oltre la porta d’ingresso.

All’interno, la cornucopia di oggetti assale i sensi. Ci sono scheletri e teschi di animali di ogni specie, tutti in vendita, esemplari tassidermici, altri sotto alcol, ninnoli e portachiavi ricavati da ossa autentiche. Insomma, troverete il regalo di Natale giusto per chiunque.

E per i vostri bambini più indisciplinati quest’anno, al posto del solito vecchio carbone, Babbo Natale potrebbe lasciare sotto l’albero una nuova sorpresa: leccalecca con scorpioni e altri insetti incorporati.

Al piano superiore i titolari espongono i pezzi di maggior valore della loro collezione. Spicca una serie di scheletri umani, di cui uno femminile che ospita nel grembo uno scheletro fetale fissato in posizione di gravidanza. E poi ancora maschere tribali, teste rimpicciolite, uova di dinosauro, pietre preziose, animali impagliati o essiccati, fossili, coralli, farfalle multicolori e insetti esotici.

I prezzi non sono sempre popolari, ma nemmeno esorbitanti, e variano considerevolmente a seconda delle vostre esigenze. Comunque, se non volete spendere troppo, gli impiegati e i gestori del negozio, tutti accomunati dalla classica gentilezza newyorkese, saranno più che felici di impacchettarvi uno squalo sotto alcol (solo $29) o l’osso del pene di qualche mammifero ($6).

Sbucando con la metro all’East Village si entra in una dimensione totalmente diversa. Le foglie in questa stagione si fanno gialle e risaltano sulle pareti in mattoni e fra le scale antincendio esterne, che abbiamo visto in innumerevoli film. Qui, dalle parti di Cooper Union, c’è St. Mark’s Place, una stradina dedicata ai tatuaggi, ai piercing e all’abbigliamento punk e glam. Residuati della no-future generation, ormai cinquantenni ma ancora orgogliosamente imborchiati e dai (radi) capelli dipinti, gestiscono piccoli negozi di oggettistica e fashion. Anche se non siete tipi da creste e catene, vi consigliamo comunque di farvi un giro all’interno del negozio di vintage e usato Search & Destroy – se non altro per dare un’occhiata al delirante allestimento del negozio.

Qui i vestiti sono quasi nascosti da un’accozzaglia di giocattoli, props e collectibles: e se all’entrata siete salutati da bambole con la maschera antigas, modellini anatomici e feti deformi in gomma, all’interno i toni si fanno ancora più splatter. Un finto maiale sgozzato a grandezza naturale è appeso al soffitto, dal quale penzola anche un manichino fetish in posizione di bondage. Un flipper sta vicino a maschere di carnevale di mostri iperrealistici e sanguinosi. Ovunque manichini in pose oscene e, particolare non trascurabile, dalle parti genitali correttamente rappresentate. Purtroppo i gestori orientali sono (giustamente) gelosi del loro arredamento e ci permettono di scattare soltanto qualche foto.

Poco più avanti, sempre qui all’East Village, sulla decima strada, si trova uno dei negozi più celebri: si tratta di Obscura Antiques & Oddities.

Da quando Obscura è al centro di una serie televisiva di Discovery Channel (di cui vi avevamo parlato in questo articolo), il piccolo spazio espositivo è perennemente affollato. E la gente compra, il giro di affari è in stabile crescita e di conseguenza la collezione è in continuo cambiamento.

Obscura è l’analogo newyorkese del nostro Nautilus, anche se gli manca quella maniacale e coreografica cura espositiva che Alessandro ha donato alla sua bottega delle meraviglie. D’altronde Mike ci racconta che stanno per trasferirsi in uno spazio più grande, dove finalmente la collezione potrà evitare di essere accatastata e un po’ disordinata com’è adesso. Comunque sia, i pezzi sono davvero straordinari e l’atmosfera unica.

Fra tutti spicca la testa mummificata divenuta un po’ il simbolo di Obscura, tanto da farne delle minuscole repliche per portachiavi.

Ma le sorprese sono tante, e fra scheletri umani, strani animali, oggetti di antiquariato medico e bizzarrie in tutto e per tutto ascrivibili alla tradizione denominata Americana, si potrebbe perdere una buona oretta a curiosare.

Mike ed Evan, la strana coppia di proprietari, sono fra le persone più gentili e disponibili del mondo, talmente colti e appassionati che è una goduria anche solo rimanere ad ascoltarli mentre rispondono alle domande più stravaganti dei clienti. Il giro di collezionismo legato ad Obscura è impressionante, ma di certo anche voi riuscirete a trovare almeno un regalino per chi, fra i vostri conoscenti, ha già davvero tutto.

Bizzarro Bazar a New York – I

New York, Novembre 2011. È notte. Il vento gelido frusta le guance, s’intrufola fra i grattacieli e scende sulle strade in complicati vortici, senza che si possa prevedere da che parte arriverà la prossima sferzata. Anche le correnti d’aria sono folli ed esagerate, qui a Times Square, dove il tramonto non esiste, perché i maxischermi e le insegne brillanti degli spettacoli on-Broadway non lasciano posto alle ombre. Le basse temperature e il forte vento non fermano però il vostro esploratore del bizzarro, che con la scusa di una settimana nella Grande Mela, ha deciso di accompagnarvi alla scoperta di alcuni dei negozi e dei musei più stravaganti di New York.

Partiamo proprio da qui, da Times Square, dove un’insegna luminosa attira lo sguardo del curioso, promettendo meraviglie: si tratta del museo Ripley’s – Believe It Or Not!, una delle più celebri istituzioni mondiali del weird, che conta decine di sedi in tutto il mondo. Proudly freakin’ out families for 90 years! (“Spaventiamo le famiglie, orgogliosamente, da 90 anni”), declama uno dei cartelloni animati.

L’idea di base del Ripley’s sta proprio in quel “credici, oppure no”: si tratta di un museo interamente dedicato allo strano, al deviante, al macabro e all’incredibile. Ad ogni nuovo pezzo in esposizione sembra quasi che il museo ci sfidi a comprendere se sia tutto vero o se si tratti una bufala. Se volete sapere la risposta, beh, la maggior parte delle sorprendenti e incredibili storie raccontate durante la visita sono assolutamente vere. Scopriamo quindi le reali dimensioni dei nani e dei giganti più celebri, vediamo vitelli siamesi e giraffe albine impagliate, fotografie e storie di freak celebri.

Ma il tono ironico e fieramente “exploitation” di questa prima parte di museo lascia ben presto il posto ad una serie di reperti ben più seri e spettacolari; le sezioni antropologiche diventano via via più impressionanti, alternando vetrine con armi arcaiche a pezzi decisamente più macabri, come quelli che adornano le sale dedicate alle shrunken heads (le teste umane rimpicciolite dai cacciatori tribali del Sud America), o ai meravigliosi kapala tibetani.

Tutto ciò che può suscitare stupore trova posto nelle vetrine del museo: dalla maschera funeraria di Napoleone Bonaparte, alla pistola minuscola ma letale che si indossa come un anello, alle microsculture sulle punte di spillo.

Talvolta è la commistione di buffoneria carnevalesca e di inaspettata serietà a colpire lo spettatore. Ad esempio, in una pacchiana sala medievaleggiante, che propone alcuni strumenti di tortura in “azione” su ridicoli manichini, troviamo però una sedia elettrica d’epoca (vera? ricostruita?) e perfino una testa umana sezionata (questa indiscutibilmente vera). Il tutto per il giubilo dei bambini, che al Ripley’s accorrono a frotte, e per la perplessità dei genitori che, interdetti, non sanno più se hanno fatto davvero bene a portarsi dietro la prole.

Insomma, quello che resta maggiormente impresso del Ripley’s – Believe It Or Not è proprio questa furba commistione di ciarlataneria e scrupolo museale, che mira a confondere e strabiliare lo spettatore, lasciandolo frastornato e meravigliato.

Per tornare unpo’ con i piedi per terra, eccoci quindi a un museo più “serio” e “ufficiale”, ma di certo non più sobrio. Si tratta del celeberrimo American Museum of Natural History, uno dei musei di storia naturale più grandi del mondo – quello, per intenderci, in cui passava una notte movimentata Ben Stiller in una delle sue commedie di maggior successo.

Una giornata intera basta appena per visitare tutte le sale e per soffermarsi velocemente sulle varie sezioni scientifiche che meriterebbero ben più attenzione.

Oltre alle molte sale dedicate all’antropologia paleoamericana (ricostruzioni accurate degli utensili e dei costumi dei nativi, ecc.), il museo offre mostre stagionali in continuo rinnovo, una sala IMAX per la proiezione di filmati di interesse scientifico, un’impressionante sezione astronomica, diverse sale dedicate alla paleontologia e all’evoluzione dell’uomo, e infine la celebre sezione dedicata ai dinosauri (una delle più complete al mondo, amata alla follia dai bambini).

Ma forse i veri gioielli del museo sono due in particolare: il primo è costituito dall’ampio uso di splendidi diorami, in cui gli animali impagliati vengono inseriti all’interno di microambienti ricreati ad arte. Che si tratti di mammiferi africani, asiatici o americani, oppure ancora di animali marini, questi tableaux sono accurati fin nel minimo dettaglio per dare un’idea di spontanea vitalità, e da una vetrina all’altra ci si immerge in luoghi distanti, come se fossimo all’interno di un attimo raggelato, di fronte ad alcuni degli esemplari tassidermici più belli del mondo per precisione e naturalezza.

L’altra sezione davvero mozzafiato è quella dei minerali. Strano a dirsi, perché pensiamo ai minerali come materia fissa, inerte, e che poche emozioni può regalare – fatte salve le pietre preziose, che tanto piacciono alle signore e ai ladri cinematografici. Eppure, appena entriamo nelle immense sale dedicate alle pietre, si spalanca di fronte a noi un mondo pieno di forme e colori alieni. Non soltanto siamo stati testimoni, nel resto del museo, della spettacolare biodiversità delle diverse specie animali, o dei misteri del cosmo e delle galassie: ecco, qui, addirittura le pietre nascoste nelle pieghe della terra che calpestiamo sembrano fatte apposta per lasciarci a bocca aperta.

Teniamo a sottolineare che nessuna foto può rendere giustizia ai colori, ai riflessi e alle mille forme incredibili dei minerali esposti e catalogati nelle vetrine di questa sezione.

Alla fine della visita è normale sentirsi leggermente spossati: il Museo nel suo complesso non è certo una passeggiata rilassante, anzi, è una continua ginnastica della meraviglia, che richiede curiosità e attenzione per i dettagli. Eppure la sensazione che si ha, una volta usciti, è di aver soltanto graffiato la superficie: ogni aspetto di questo mondo nasconde, ora ne siamo certi, infinite sorprese.

(continua…)

Il Gigante di Cardiff

In quel tempo c’erano sulla terra i giganti,
e ci furono anche di poi,
quando i figliuoli di Dio si accostarono
alle figliuole degli uomini,
e queste fecero loro de’ figliuoli.
(Genesi, 6:4)

Era il 1868. Il tabaccaio George Hull era ateo, e non sopportava quei cristiani fondamentalisti che prendevano la Bibbia alla lettera. Così, dopo un’ennesima discussione esasperante con un suo concittadino convinto che nelle Sacre Scritture non vi potesse essere alcuna metafora, Hull decise che si sarebbe preso gioco di tutti i creduloni, e forse ci avrebbe anche fatto qualche soldo. Si preparò quindi a mettere in piedi quella che sarebbe stata ricordata in seguito come la “più grande burla della storia americana”.

George Hull acquistò un terreno ricco di gesso nello Iowa, e fece estrarre un grosso blocco di pietra squadrata. Con enormi difficoltà, riuscì a far spostare l’ingombrante fardello fino alla ferrovia, dichiarando che serviva per un monumento commissionatogli a Washington. Ma il blocco di gesso venne invece spedito a Chicago, a casa di Edwin Burkhardt, uno scultore di lapidi e busti funerari. Hull l’aveva infatti convinto a lavorare in segreto, con la promessa di un lauto pagamento, alla scultura che aveva in mente. Lo stesso George Hull fece da modello per quella strana statua di quattro metri e mezzo, e quando l’opera fu completa i due passarono sul gesso acidi, mordenti e agenti macchianti per “invecchiare” la scultura. Riuscirono addirittura a ricreare quelli che avrebbero dovuto essere scambiati per i pori della pelle.

Hull tornò quindi con il suo “gigante” a New York, dove lo seppellì dietro il fienile del suo amico e complice William “Stub” Newell.  Lasciarono passare un anno e poi, con la scusa che serviva un nuovo pozzo, pagarono una ditta di scavi per cominciare i lavori. Gli operai, ovviamente ignari, scoprirono l’incredibile statua, e già il pomeriggio seguente Hull e Newell avevano eretto una tenda attorno alla “tomba del gigante pietrificato” e chiedevano ai visitatori 25 centesimi per poter ammirare quella meraviglia. Cominciò un immenso passaparola, e il prezzo di entrata raddoppiò in poco tempo a 50 centesimi – una cifra altissima per l’epoca.

Il gigante di Cardiff divenne l’argomento dell’anno: politici, accademici e religiosi ne discutevano con fervore, e le teorie più assurde vennero proposte per spiegare l’enigma. Secondo alcuni il gigante era un missionario gesuita del 1500, secondo altri un indiano irochese Onondaga, ma per la maggioranza, come aveva sperato Hull, il gigante era la dimostrazione inconfutabile che ciò che era scritto nella Bibbia non era soltanto una verità spirituale, ma anche storica. Nemmeno la lettera, proveniente da Chicago, di uno sconosciuto scultore tedesco che affermava di aver preso parte alla beffa, convinse nessuno: erano certamente i vaneggiamenti di un pazzo. Un geologo dichiarò: “il gigante ha il marchio del tempo stampato su ogni arto e fattezza, in un modo e con una precisione che nessun uomo può imitare”.

Il gigante di Cardiff, cominciato come un costoso ed elaborato scherzo, stava diventando un business enorme: venne spostato a Syracuse, dove il prezzo del biglietto salì fino a 1 dollaro – più o meno 60 euro di oggi.

E qui entra in scena il geniale P. T. Barnum. Come sempre, appena fiutava odore di affari, il più grande showman di tutta l’America non si faceva scrupoli. Barnum offrì a Hull 50.000$ per portare in tour il gigante per tre mesi, ma Hull rifiutò. Barnum però non era certo tipo da darsi per vinto: riuscì a corrompere una guardia, e di notte fece intrufolare nella tenda un suo artigiano, che eseguì un calco in cera del gigante. Tornato a New York, ricavò dal calco in cera una copia in gesso, del tutto identica alla statua di Hull, per esporla nel suo museo.

Adesso c’erano quindi in giro ben due giganti! Cominciò una battaglia tragicomica, senza esclusione di colpi. Barnum dichiarò che il suo gigante era l’originale, che aveva comprato da Hull, e che quello di Hull era un falso. Hull denunciò Barnum per diffamazione. In tribunale, Hull ammise che il gigante era una burla, e la corte decise che Barnum non poteva essere ritenuto colpevole di aver dichiarato che il gigante di Hull era un falso, dato che lo era. Durante la disputa, un collaboratore di Hull pronunciò la celebre frase There’s a sucker born every minute (“Ogni minuto nasce un nuovo babbeo”), che sarebbe poi stata erroneamente attribuita a Barnum, e che riassume perfettamente una certa filosofia dello show-business.

E infatti i “babbei” non si fecero attendere. Il processo, paradossalmente, riaccese la curiosità del pubblico per “la grande burla del gigante di Cardiff”, e la folla ricominciò a pagare per vedere non più uno, ma due giganti, che su strade separate continuarono la loro carriera per molti anni, fruttando una fortuna sia a Hull che a Barnum. Se vi interessa sono ancora visibili. L’originale è esposto al Farmer’s Museum a Cooperstown, New York, mentre è possibile ammirare la copia di Barnum al Marvin’s Marvelous Mechanical Museum di Detroit. Ed entrambi valgono il prezzo del biglietto… se siete dei babbei.

Jenny Saville

Diamo il benvenuto alla nostra nuova guestblogger, Marialuisa, che ha curato il seguente articolo.

La deformità, la carne, il sangue, sono tutti elementi che ci spingono in qualche modo a entrare in contatto con il lato puramente fisico del nostro essere.

Abituati a crearci un’immagine di noi che spesso dipende da elementi astratti e artificiosi quali status sociale, moda, potere, spesso dimentichiamo che siamo corpi di ossa e sangue. Ecco allora che la deformità – di una ferita, della putrefazione, della malattia – entra nei nostri occhi a ricordarci cosa siamo, quanto siamo fragili e in fondo semplici, spogliati dei nostri trucchi.

Jenny Saville, pittrice inglese nata nel 1970, estrapola con i suoi quadri il fascino cruento della deformità, espone corpi oscenamente grassi, feriti, tumefatti e ci lascia entrare nelle vite di questi personaggi bidimensionali. Ci permette di vederli davvero umani in quanto imperfetti; e non possiamo fare a meno di continuare a fissarli perché queste ferite, questi cumuli di adipe, questi sessi in mostra che non rispecchiano il viso di chi li possiede, sono qualcosa di nuovo, di reale e così vivo da essere più bello delle immagini, sterili e patinate, che quotidianamente definiamo “perfette”. L’artista, interessata a quella che chiama “patologia della pittura”, dipinge quadri enormi, le cui dimensioni permettono quasi di sentire la porosità della pelle, di perdersi fra le pieghe e i tagli di questi corpi violati. I nostri occhi vengono indirizzati, dalla composizione dell’immagine e dal sapiente uso dei colori, attraverso un preciso percorso dello sguardo.

Così, Jenny Saville ci rende partecipi di qualcosa che è successo, di un atto. Ci porta a immaginare ciò che è realmente osceno (e che appunto rimane fuori scena): una vita passata a ingozzarsi per sconfiggere la tristezza, o il pugno che si è abbattuto sul viso di un ragazzino, le angosce di chi si sente prigioniero di un corpo sbagliato. La violenza, autoinferta o subìta, è il tema primario – i corpi sono i veri protagonisti, a ricordarci che in fondo è questo che siamo.

Ecco il profilo dell’artista sul sito (in inglese) della Gagosian Gallery di New York. Sempre in inglese, ma più completa della versione italiana, la pagina di Wikipedia dedicata all’artista.

Sculture tassidermiche – III

Concludiamo qui la nostra serie di post sulla scultura tassidermica.

Partiamo subito da una delle artiste più controverse, Katinka Simonese, conosciuta con il nome d’arte di Tinkebell. Artista provocatoria, Katinka cerca di mettere davanti ai nostri occhi i punti ciechi della nostra società moderna. Per fare un esempio, milioni di polli maschi sono uccisi ogni giorno (spesso vengono gettati con forza contro un muro del pollaio); ma se Katinka replica la stessa azione in pubblico, viene arrestata. Allo stesso modo, l’artista ha trasformato il suo stesso gatto in una borsa in pelliccia double-face che può essere rivoltata per diventare un cagnolino. Per denunciare il fatto che il nostro “amore” per i cuccioli domestici è diventato uno status symbol, un commercio bell’e buono, più che un vero affetto per gli animali.