The Homunculus Inside

Paracelsushomunculus, the result of complicated alchemic recipes, is an allegorical figure that fascinated the collective uncoscious for centuries. Its fortune soon surpassed the field of alchemy, and the homunculus was borrowed by literature (Goethe, to quote but one example), psychology (Jung wrote about it), cinema (take the wonderful, ironic Pretorius scene from The Bride of Frankenstein, 1935), and the world of illustration (I’m thinking in particular of Stefano Bessoni). Even today the homunculus hasn’t lost its appeal: the mysterious videos posted by a Russian youtuber, purportedly showing some strange creatures developed through unlikely procedures, scored tens of millions of views.

Yet I will not focus here on the classic, more or less metaphorical homunculus, but rather on the way the word is used in pathology.
Yes beacuse, unbeknownst to you, a rough human figure could be hiding inside your own body.
Welcome to a territory where the grotesque bursts into anatomy.

Let’s take a step back to how life starts.
In the beginning, the fertilized cell (zygote) is but one cell; it immediately starts dividing, generating new cells, which in turn proliferate, transform, migrate. After roughly two weeks, the different cellular populations organize into three main areas (germ layers), each one with its given purpose — every layer is in charge of the formation of a specific kind of structure. These three specialized layers gradually create the various anatomical shapes, building the skin, nerves, bones, organs, apparatuses, and so on. This metamorphosis, this progressive “surfacing” of order ends when the fetus is completely developed.

Sometimes it might happen that this very process, for some reason, gets activated again in adulthood.
It is as if some cells, falling for an unfathomable hallucination, believed they still are at an embryonic stage: therefore they begin weaving new structures, abnormal growths called teratomas, which closely resemble the outcome of the first germ differentiations.

These mad cells start producing hair, bones, teeth, nails, sometimes cerebral or tyroid matter, even whole eyes. Hystologically these tumors, benign in most cases, can appear solid, wrapped inside cystes, or both.

In very rare cases, a teratoma can be so highly differentiated as to take on an antropomorphic shape, albeit rudimentary. These are the so-called fetiform teratomas (homunculus).

Clinical reports of this anomaly really have an uncanny, David Cronenberg quality: one homunculus found in 2003 inside an ovarian teratoma in a 25-year-old virginal woman, showed the presence of brain, spinal chord, ears, teeth, tyroid gland, bone, intestines, trachea, phallic tissue and one eye in the middle of the forehead.
In 2005 another fetiform mass had hairs and arm buds, with fingers and nails. In 2006 a reported homunculus displayed one upper limb and two lower limbs complete with feet and toes. In 2010 another mass presented a foot with fused toes, hair, bones and marrow. In 2015 a 13-year-old patient was found to carry a fetiform teratoma exhibiting hair, vestigial limbs, a rudimentary digestive tube and a cranial formation containing meninxes and neural tissue.

What causes these cells to try and create a new, impossible life? And are we sure that the minuscule, incomplete fetus wasn’t really there from the beginning?
Among the many proposed hypothesis, in fact, there is also the idea that homunculi (difficult to study because of their scarcity in scientific literature) may not be actual tumors, but actually the remnants of a parasitic twin, incapsulated within his sibling’s body during the embryonic phase. If this was the case, they would not qualify as teratomas, falling into the fetus in fetu category.

But the two phenomenons are mainly regarded as separate.
To distinguish one from the other, pathologists rely on the existence of a spinal column (which is present in the fetus in fetu but not in teratomas), on their localization (teratomas are chiefly found near the reproductive area, the fetus in fetu within the retroperitoneal space) and on zygosity (teratomas are often differentiated from the surrounding tissues, as if they were “fraternal twins” in regard to their host, while the fetus in fetu is homozygote).

The study of these anomalous formations might provide valuable information for the understanding of human development and parthenogenesis (essential for the research on stem cells).
But the intriguing aspect is exactly their problematic nature. As I said, each time doctors encounter a homunculus, the issue is always how to categorize it: is it a teratoma or a parasitic twin? A structure that “emerged” later, or a shape which was there from the start?

It is interesting to note that this very uncertainty also has existed in regard to normal embryos for the over 23 centuries. The debate focused on a similar question: do fetuses arise from scratch, or are they preexistent?
This is the ancient dispute between the supporters of epigenesis and preformationism, between those who claimed that embryonic structures formed out of indistinct matter, and those who thought that they were already included in the egg.
Aristotle, while studying chicken embryos, had already speculated that the unborn child’s physical structures acquire solidity little by little, guided by the soul; in the XVIII Century this theory was disputed by preformationism. According to the enthusiasts of this hypothesis (endorsed by high-profile scholars such as Leibniz, Spallanzani and Diderot), the embryo was already perfectly formed inside the egg, ab ovo, only too small to be visible to the naked eye; during development, it would just have to grow in size, as a baby does after birth.
Where did this idea come from? An important part was surely played by a well-known etching by Nicolaas Hartsoeker, who was among the first scientists to observe seminal fluid under the microscope, as well as being a staunch supporter of the existence of minuscule, completely formed fetuses hiding inside the heads of sperm cells.
And Hartsoeker, in turn, had taken inspiration precisely from the famous alchemical depictions of the homunculus.

In a sense, the homunculus appearing in an ancient alchemist’s vial and the ones studied by pathologists nowadays are not that different. They can both be seen as symbols of the enigma of development, of the fundamental mystery surrounding birth and life. Miniature images of the ontological dilemma which has been forever puzzling humanity: do we appear from indistinct chaos, or did our heart and soul exist somewhere, somehow, before we were born?


Little addendum of anatomical pathology (and a bit of genetics)
by Claudia Manini, MD

Teratomas are germ cell tumors composed of an array of tissues derived from two or three embryonic layers (ectoderm, mesoderm, endoderm) in any combination.
The great majority of teratomas are benign cystic tumors mainly located in ovary, containing mature (adult-type) tissues; rarely they contains embryonal tissues (“immature teratomas”) and, if so, they have a higher malignant potential.
The origin of teratomas has been a matter of interest, speculation, and dispute for centuries because of their exotic composition.
The partenogenic theory, which suggests an origin from the primordial germ cell, is now the most widely accepted. The other two theories, one suggesting an origin from blastomeres segregated at an early stage of embryonic development and the second suggesting an origin from embryonal rests have few adherents currently. Support for the germ cell theory has come from anatomic distribution of the tumors, which occurs along the body midline of migration of the primordial germ cell, from the fact that the tumors occur most commonly during the reproductive age (epidemiologic-observational but also experimental data) and from cytogenetic analysis which has demonstrated genotypic differences between omozygous teratomatous tissue and heterozygous host tissue.
The primordial germ cells are the common origins of gametes (spermatozoa and oocyte, that are mature germ cells) which contain a single set of 23 chromosomas (haploid cells). During fertilization two gametes fuse together and originate a new cell which have a dyploid and heterozygous genetic pool (a double set of 23 chromosomas from two different organism).
On the other hand, the cells composing a teratoma show an identical genetic pool between the two sets of chromosomes.
Thus teratomas, even when they unexpectedly give rise to fetiform structures, are a different phenomenon from the fetus in fetu, and they fall within the scope of tumoral and not-malformative pathology.
All this does not lessen the impact of the observation, and a certain awe in considering the differentiation potential of one single germ cell.

References
Kurman JR et al., Blaustein’s pathology of the female genital tract, Springer 2011
Prat J., Pathology of the ovary, Saunders 2004

Mummie officinali

mummia

Se vi dicessimo che soltanto tre secoli fa i nostri antenati praticavano diffusamente il cannibalismo, non ci credereste. E certamente non staremmo parlando di cadaveri smembrati e fatti arrosto sulla griglia. Esistono forme più sottili e meno eclatanti per mangiare un morto.

Fino al 1800 in Europa coloro che erano affetti da qualche tipo di malattia sapevano di poter contare su uno dei farmaci più potenti e ricercati di sempre: le mummie.
A patto di poterselo permettere, si aveva facoltà di acquistare tutta una varietà di unguenti, oli, tinture e polveri estratti da cadaveri mummificati, per uso esterno ed interno. Alcuni di questi rimedi andavano spalmati sulla parte dolorante, altri servivano per impacchi da porre direttamente sulle ferite aperte, altri ancora venivano assunti per via orale oppure inalati. Curavano quasi ogni genere di disturbo, dall’emicrania all’epilessia, dal mal di stomaco al mal di denti, dalle punture velenose alle ulcere, e via dicendo.

Mummy_at_British_Museum

Da quando furono scoperte nelle tombe egizie, le mummie esercitarono immediatamente un fortissimo fascino sull’immaginario occidentale: corpi miracolosamente incorrotti, sottoposti a un misterioso procedimento che rendeva le loro carni impermeabili al passare del tempo. L’idea che le mummie potessero avere degli effetti benefici contro le malattie e per allungare la vita derivava da due concetti molto in voga nei secoli passati.
Da una parte c’era la dottrina della transplantatio, mutuata da Paracelso, secondo cui un corpo morto poteva ancora “trasferire” le sue qualità spirituali: dal punto di vista antropologico, quest’idea è molto simile al cannibalismo rituale vero e proprio, in cui il corpo del nemico viene mangiato per ottenere il suo coraggio e la forza dimostrata in battaglia – e alcuni hanno voluto leggere perfino nel rituale dell’Eucarestia la stessa volontà, tramite la libagione simbolica delle carni (il “corpo di Cristo”), di appropriarsi dei caratteri spirituali superiori del defunto/santo.
Dall’altra parte si credeva nel principio terapeutico denominato similia similibus, vale a dire che il male andava sconfitto con qualcosa che gli fosse simile. In questo senso, per il corpo umano nessun ritrovato terapeutico poteva essere più efficace che il corpo umano stesso. Tutte le secrezioni prodotte in vita erano utilizzate come farmaci, e com’è naturale anche il corpo morto aveva le sue virtù.

Ma non pensiate che queste pratiche fossero appannaggio dell’antichità. Il corpo umano era considerato insostituibile per la guarigione da disturbi e malattie ancora a metà del ‘700, tanto che la Farmacopea di James del 1758 riporta alla voce Homo:

l’Uomo non è solo il soggetto della medicina, ma anche contribuisce dal suo corpo molte cose alla Materia Medica. I [composti] semplici delle Officine, tratti dal corpo umano ancora vivo, sono i peli, le ugne, la saliva, la cera delle orecchie, il sudore, il latte, il sangue mestruo, le secondine, l’orina, il sangue e la membrana che copre la testa del feto […].

Altre fonti citano fra i prodotti naturali del corpo umano da utilizzare come farmaci anche il seme, lo sterco, i vermi intestinali, i calcoli, i pidocchi. Il testo medico precedente continua così:

Li semplici poi, che si traggono dal cadavero umano, sono la Mummia, che ha una superfizie resinosa, indurita, nera, e risplendente, di sapore alquanto acre, e amaretto, e di odore fragrante.

EGYPT-MUMMY-RAMSES

Con queste premesse, è ovvio che le straordinarie mummie egiziane, che tanto stupore avevano suscitato fin dai tempi di Erodoto, fossero ritenute fra le più raffinate panacee esistenti. Le resine e gli unguenti utilizzati per conservare il cadavere in Egitto non facevano che esaltare le proprietà curative del cadavere stesso. Per questo motivo, tutte le farmacopee del XVII e XVIII secolo avvertono che vi sono sul mercato tipi differenti di mummia, e che bisogna saperli ben distinguere per non farsi “fregare” al momento dell’acquisto. La categorizzazione più precisa è forse quella di Johann Schroder (1600-1664), contenuta nella sua Pharmacopoeia:

1. Mummia degli Arabi, che è il liquame, o liquore, denso che essuda dai cadaveri nel sepolcro conditi con aloe, Mirra e Balsamo.
2. Degli Egiziani, che è il liquame sprigionato dai cadaveri conditi con il Pissasfalto [pece + asfalto]. Sicuramente così venivano conditi i cadaveri dei poveri, e pertanto non si trovano facilmente esposti cadaveri in tal modo conditi.
3. Pissasfalto composto, cioè bitume misto a pece, che rivendicano essere vera Mummia.
4. Cadavere disseccato sotto l’arena arsa dal Sole. Si trova nella regione degli Ammoni, che è tra la regione di Cirene ed Alessandria, dove le Sirti deserte, sollevato il turbine dei venti, seppelliscono i corpi degli incauti viandanti, e qui asciugano e seccano i loro cadaveri per il calore del Sole ardente.
5. A queste si può aggiungere la Mummia recente.

Le mummie più pregiate rimasero sempre le mummie “nere”, egiziane, rubate dai nobili mausolei e dalle tombe più antiche; le meno efficaci invece erano quelle “recenti”, ovvero dei cadaveri morti da poco, trattati in modo che le proprietà benefiche ne fossero esaltate. Dato il fiorente mercato di mummie o parti di mummia (il porto di Venezia era rinomato per questo particolare smercio), bisognava davvero fare attenzione a tutti quei venditori disonesti che si procuravano dei cadaveri, li essiccavano frettolosamente e cercavano di farli passare per mummie autentiche.
Se invece si voleva fare le cose per bene, anche in assenza di una Mumia d’elite egiziana, si poteva ricorrere alla Basilica Chymica (1608), in cui Osvald Croll esponeva la ricetta per la preparazione della mummia di Paracelso, detta Filosofica o Spirituale:

Si prenda il cadavere di un uomo rosso, sano, appena morto di morte vergognosa, di circa ventiquattro anni, impiccato, tritato dalla Ruota o impalato, raccolto con un tempo sereno, di notte o di giorno. Questa Mummia, una volta colorata ed irradiata da due finestre, si trita a pezzi o a briciole e si cosparge di polvere di Mirra, di almeno un po’ di Aloe (poiché troppa la renderebbe amara), poi si imbeve, lasciandola macerare per qualche giorno in spirito di vino; viene a sospendersene un poco e si imbeve per la seconda volta, dal momento che quanto è venuto a sospendersi si seccherebbe inutilmente all’aria sino a prender l’aspetto della carne arrostita senza odore. Poi con lo Spirito di vino, come secondo l’arte, o con quello Sambucino, si estrae una tintura rubicondissima.

Avete letto bene, grappa o sambuca di mummia. Ovviamente qui la transplantatio di cui parlavamo prima, ossia il passaggio delle qualità spirituali dal morto al vivo, viene dimenticata (chi vorrebbe assumere le qualità di un criminale condannato a morte?) in favore di un’attenzione particolare per la buona “salute” del cadavere – giovane, di pelle chiara, senza macchie e fisicamente sano. La formula di Croll, con qualche variante, resterà la base per tutti i preparati di mummia officinale in età moderna, talvolta chiamata mummia liquida, Mummia dei Medici Chimici, ecc.

Verso la fine del XVIII secolo la mummia comincerà pian piano a sparire dalle farmacopee ufficiali, sostituita da nuovi composti, in concomitanza con il progresso della chimica applicata e della farmacologia. Questa commistione, ai nostri occhi inconcepibile, di medicina galenica e di alchimia andrà affievolendosi fino ad essere totalmente rifiutata dalla scienza nella prima metà dell’800. Le due discipline si separeranno definitivamente, e le mummie superstiti troveranno posto nei musei, invece che sugli scaffali dei farmacisti.

Apothecary mummy

Le informazioni contenute in questo articolo provengono dallo studio di Silvia Marinozzi, La mummia come rimedio terapeutico, in Le mummie e l’arte medica nell’Evo Moderno, Medicina nei Secoli, Supplemento 1, 2005.

Homunculus

Abbiamo già parlato di Stefano Bessoni nel nostro speciale dedicato al film Krokodyle (2010). Ritorniamo ad occuparci di lui e del suo universo macabro e sorprendente, più unico che raro in Italia, perché proprio domani esce in tutte le librerie, edito da Logos, un suo libro di illustrazioni incentrate sul tema dell’homunculus.

L’omuncolo è un essere “artificiale”, creato cioè secondo segreti rituali alchemici, e la sua leggenda  risale all’inizio del 1500. Sembra che il primo a parlare della possibilità di creare la vita a partire da un complesso procedimento, a metà strada fra scienza e magia, sia stato l’astrologo e alchimista Paracelso. La peculiarità degli omuncoli è quello di essere una sorta di uomini in miniatura – talvolta perfettamente formati, ma altre volte meno “riusciti”.

Prendendo spunto da queste antiche teorie, Stefano Bessoni in questa fiaba gotica ci racconta la storia di Zendak, un medico anatomista tassidermista che assieme alla figlia Rachel è diventato celebre per i suoi preparati anatomici, soprattutto di feti e bambini preservati in formalina; ma, impazzito a causa della morte di Rachel, Zendak si dedicherà alle arti oscure, cercando di dare vita a un omuncolo che possa riempire il vuoto lasciato dalla perdita della figlia adorata.

La storia è narrata con una filastrocca in rima, come accadeva nelle vecchie favole, e alle parole si accompagnano i cupi, malinconici, poetici e ironici disegni di Bessoni; inoltre impreziosisce il libriccino un’appendice finale che contiene delle ricette (alcune più classiche, altre più moderne, ma tutte rigorosamente testate e funzionanti!) per la preparazione e la creazione di un omuncolo.

Homunculus di Stefano Bessoni è acquistabile anche online a questo indirizzo.