Capsula Mundi

I have sometimes talked about the false dichotomy between Nature and Culture, that weird, mostly Western aberration that sees mankind separated and opposed to the rest of the environment. This feeling of estrangement is what’s behind the melancholy for the original union, now presumed lost: we look at birds in a tree, and regret we are not that carefree and unrestrained; we look at our cities and struggle to find them “natural”, because we insisted in building them with rigid geometries rarely found elsewhere, as if to mark the difference with all other habitats in which straight lines seldom exist.
This vision of man as a creature completely different from other living beings has found an obvious declination in Western burials. It’s one of the very few traditions in which the grave is designed to keep the body from returning to earth (of course in the past centuries this also had to do with the idea of preserving the body for the ultimate Resurrection).
But there is someone who is trying to change this perspective.

Picture your death as a voyage through three different states of matter. Imagine crossing the boundaries between animal, mineral and plant kingdom.
This is the concept behind Capsula Mundi, an italian startup devised by Anna Citelli and Raoul Bretzel, which over the past decade has been trying to achieve a new, eco-friendly and poetic kind of burial. An egg made of biodegradable material will wrap the body arranged in fetal position, or the ashes; once planted underground, it will grow a specific tree, chosen by the deceased when still alive. One after the other, these “graves” will form a real sacred forest where relatives and friends can wander around, taking care of the very plants grown, fed and left as inheritance by their dear departed. A more joyful alternative to the heavy, squared marble gravestone, and a way of accepting death as a transition, a transformation rather than the end of life.

Actually the very idea of a “capsule” incorporates two separate connotations. On one hand there’s the scientific idea of a membrane, of a cell, of a seed for new life. And the shell enveloping the body — not by chance arranged in fetal position — is a sort of replica of the original embryo, a new amniotic sac which symbolically affirms the specularity (or even the identity) of birth and death. On the other, there is the concept of a “capsule” as a vehicle, a sci-fi pod, a vessel leading the corpse from the animal kingdom to the mineral kingdom, allowing all the body components to decompose and to be absorbed by the plant roots.
Death may look like a black monolith, but it gives rise to the cosmic fetus, the ever-changing mutation.

The planting of a tree on burial grounds also refers to the Roman tradition:

For the ancients, being buried under the trees enabled the deceased body to be absorbed by the roots, and matter to be brought back to life within the plant. Such an interpenetration between the corpse and the arboreal organism therefore suggested a highly symbolic meaning: plunging his roots inside mother earth and pushing his top towards the sky, it was like the deceased was stretching out his arms, to protect and save his descendants, in a continuing dialogue with posterity’s affection and memory. 

(N. Giordano, Roma, potenza e simbologia: dai boschi sacri al “Miglio d’oro”, in SILVÆ – Anno VI n. 14)

I asked some questions to Anna Citelli, creator of Capsula Mundi along with Raoul Bretzel.

It is clear today that the attitude towards death and dying is changing, after a century of medicalization and removal: more and more people feel the need to discuss these topics, to confront them and above all to find new (secular) narratives addressing them. In this sense, Capsula Mundi is both a practical and symbolic project. From what did you draw inspiration for this idea? The “capsule” was shaped like an egg from the beginning, or were you initially thinking of something else?

We unveiled the Capsula Mundi project in 2003, at the Salone del Mobile in Milan. It was not the first time we exhibited at the Salon, albeit independently from one another. Our works at the time were already a reflection on sustainability, and when we had the occasion to work together we asked ourselves some questions about the role of designers in a society which appears removed from nature, well-satisfied and overwhelmed by objects for every necessity.
We decided to devote our work to a moment in life of extreme importance, charged with symbolic references, just like birth and wedding. Death is a delicate passage, mysterious and inevitable. It is the moment in which the person stops consuming or producing, therefore in theory it’s something distant from the glossy environment of design. But if we look at it as a natural phenomenon, a transformation of substances, death is the moment in which the being is reconnected with nature, with its perpetual changing. The coffin, an object neglected by
designers, becomes a way of reflecting on the presumption that we are not part of the biological cycle of life, a reflection on a taboo. Adopting the perfect shape of the egg was an immediate and instinctive choice, the only one that could indicate our thought: that death is not an end or an interruption, but the beginning of a new path.

How does Capsula Mundi relate to the death-positive movement? Is your project, while not aspiring to replace traditional burials but rather to offer an alternative choice, also intended to promote a cultural debate?

We have been presenting the concept of Capsula Mundi for more than a decade now, and in the last few years in the public we have finally seen a rising need to talk about death, free from any negative cultural conditioning. It is a collective and transversal need which leads to an enrichment we’ve all been waiting for. We receive a lot of letters from all over the world, from architecture students to palliative treatments operators, from botany students to documentary filmmakers. A whole variety of human beings sharing different experiences, trying to achieve a social change through debate and confrontation, to gain a new perspective on the end of life.

What point is the project at, and what difficulties are you encountering?

Green burials are prohibited in Italy, but seeing the huge demand we receive every day we decided to start the production of the small version of Capsula Mundi, for cremated remains. In the meantime we are carrying on the studies to build capsules for the whole body, but we still need some time for research.

Green burials are already a reality in other countries, as are humanist funerals. Do you think the Italian legislation in funeral matters will change any time soon?

We think that laws are always a step behind social changes. In Italy cemetery regulations date back to Napoleonic times, and legislative change will not happen quickly. But the debate is now open, and sooner or later we too will have memorial parks. Regarding cremated remains, for instance, many things have already changed, almost all regions adjusted to the citizens requests and chose some areas in which the ashes can be spread. Up until some years ago, the urn had to be left within the cemetery, under lock and key and in the keeper’s custody.

How is the audience responding to your project?

Very well. Since the beginning, in 2003, our project never caused any uproar or complaint. It was always understood beyond our expectations. Now, with the help of social medias, its popularity has grown and we just reached 34.000 likes on Facebook. In november 2015 we presented Capsula Mundi to an English-speaking audience at TEDx Torino and it’s been a huge success. For us it is a wonderful experience.

Official site: Capsula Mundi.

Emozioni vegetali

Pannocchia strappò i biglietti.
Zucchina e Broccolo entrarono nella sala e si sedettero sulle poltrone, emozionati.
Zucchina: – Ma fa davvero tanta paura, questo film?
Broccolo: – Dai, fifona, ci sono qua io!
E così dicendo, allungò ridendo un ciuffo di rametti sulla spalla di Zucchina.
Si spensero le luci, si udì una musica tenebrosa e il titolo apparve sullo schermo: LA NOTTE DEI VEGANI!

 

Di tanto in tanto i giornali pubblicano la notizia che nessun vegetariano vorrebbe mai sentire: alcuni scienziati avrebbero scoperto che anche le piante hanno un sistema nervoso, che pensano, soffrono ed hanno addirittura una memoria. Ma quanto c’è di vero in queste evidenti semplificazioni giornalistiche? Le piante sono realmente capaci di pensiero, di percezioni ed emozioni? Perfino di “ricordare” chi fa loro del bene e chi invece infligge del dolore?

Tutti abbiamo sentito dire che le piante crescono meglio se con loro si parla, se si lavano le loro foglie amorevolmente, se le si riempie di affetto. Alcuni esperti dal pollice verde giurano che facendo ascoltare la musica classica a una piantina da salotto crescerà più rigogliosa e i suoi colori si faranno più intensi. Quest’idea è in realtà nata a metà dell’Ottocento, ed è attribuita al pioniere della psicologia sperimentale Gustav Fechner, ma è stato lo scienziato indiano Chandra Bose che l’ha presa sul serio, tanto da sviluppare i primi test di laboratorio sull’argomento, agli inizi del Novecento.

Chandra Bose si convinse che le piante avessero un qualche tipo di sistema nervoso analizzando le modificazioni che avvenivano nella membrana delle cellule quando le sottoponeva a diverse condizioni: in particolare, secondo Bose, ogni pianta rispondeva a uno shock con uno “spasmo” simile a quello di un animale. Le cellule, osservò, avevano “vibrazioni” diverse a seconda che la pianta fosse coccolata o, viceversa, torturata. Pare che anche il celebre drammaturgo (vegetariano) George B. Shaw fosse rimasto sconvolto quando, in visita ai laboratori di Bose, vide un cavolo morire bollito fra atroci spasmi e convulsioni.

Ma Bose non si limitò a questo: scoprì che una musica rilassante aumentava la crescita delle piante, e una dissonante la rallentava; sperimentò con precisione l’effetto che veleni e droghe avevano sulle cellule. Infine, per dimostrare che tutto ha un’anima, o perlomeno una matrice comune, si mise ad avvelenare i metalli. Avete letto bene. Bose “somministrò” diverse quantità di veleno all’alluminio, allo zinco e al platino – ottenendo dei grafici straordinari che dimostravano che anche i metalli soffrivano di avvelenamento esattamente come ogni altro essere vivente.

Se vi sembra che Bose si sia spinto un po’ troppo in là con la fantasia, aspettate che entri in scena Cleve Backster.

Nel 1966, mentre faceva delle ricerche sulle modificazioni elettriche in una pianta che viene annaffiata, Backster collegò un poligrafo (macchina della verità) ad una delle foglie della piantina su cui stava lavorando. Con sua grande sorpresa, scoprì che il poligrafo registrava delle fluttuazioni nella resistenza elettrica del tutto simili a quelle di un uomo che viene sottoposto a un test della verità. Era possibile che la pianta stesse provando qualche tipo di stress? E se, per esempio, le avesse bruciato una foglia, cosa sarebbe successo? Proprio mentre pensava queste cose, l’ago del poligrafo impazzì, portandosi di colpo al massimo. Backster si convinse che la pianta doveva in qualche modo essersi accorta del suo progetto di bruciarle una foglia – gli aveva letto nella mente!

Da quel momento sia Backster che altri ricercatori (Horowitz, Lewis, Gasteiger) decisero di esplorare il mistero delle reazioni emotive delle piante. Attaccandole al poligrafo, registrarono i picchi e interpretarono le risposte che i vegetali davano a diverse situazioni. Gli strumenti regalavano continue sorprese: le piante “urlavano” orripilate quando i ricercatori bollivano davanti a loro dei gamberetti vivi, si calmavano quando gli scienziati mettevano sul giradischi i Notturni di Chopin, si “ubriacavano” addirittura se venivano annaffiate col vino. Non solo, mostravano di riconoscere ogni ricercatore, dando un segnale diverso e preciso ogni volta che uno di loro entrava nella stanza; “prevedevano” quello che lo scienziato stava per fare, tanto che per spaventarle gli bastava pensare di spezzare un rametto o staccare una foglia.

Il libro che dettagliava tutti i risultati di queste ricerche,  La vita segreta delle piante di Tompkins e Bird, fu pubblicato nel 1973 e divenne immediatamente un caso sensazionale. Venne addirittura adattato per il cinema, e il film omonimo (musicato da Stevie Wonder) suscitò infinite controversie.

Tutti questi scienziati interessati alle misteriose qualità paranormali delle piante avevano però una cosa in comune: mostravano un po’ troppa voglia di dimostrare le loro tesi. Successive ripetizioni di questi esperimenti, condotti da ricercatori un po’ più scettici in laboratori più “seri”, come potete immaginare, non diedero alcun risultato. Ma allora, dove sta la verità? Le piante possono o non possono pensare, ricordare, provare emozioni?

Cominciamo con lo sfatare uno dei miti più resistenti nel tempo: le piante non hanno un sistema nervoso. Come tutte le cellule viventi, anche le cellule vegetali funzionano grazie allo scambio di elettricità, ma questo passaggio di energia non si sviluppa lungo canali dedicati e preferenziali come accade con i nostri nervi. Talvolta le piante rispondono alla luce con una “cascata” di impulsi elettrici che durano anche quando la luce è terminata, e questo ha portato alcuni giornalisti a parlare di una “memoria” dell’evento; ma la metafora è sbagliata, sarebbe come dire che i cerchi sulla superficie dell’acqua continuano anche dopo che il sasso è andato a fondo perché l’acqua è capace di ricordare.

[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Zq3UuHlPLQU]

[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LXb6YKERKn4]

Se il ruolo dei segnali elettrici nelle piante è ancora in larga parte sconosciuto, questo non ci autorizza ad attribuire categorie umane ai loro comportamenti. Certo, alle volte è difficile ammirare le meraviglie del mondo vegetale senza immaginare che nascondano un qualche tipo di coscienza, o di “mente”. Pensate al geotropismo e al fototropismo: non importa come girate una pianta, le radici si dirigeranno sempre verso il basso e i rami verso l’alto, con puntuale precisione e a seconda della specie di pianta. Pensate all’edera che si arrampica per decine di metri, alle piante carnivore che scattano più veloci degli insetti, ai girasoli che seguono il nostro astro in cielo, alle piante che fioriscono soltanto quando i giorni cominciano ad allungarsi e quelle che invece fioriscono non appena le giornate si accorciano. Esiste perfino un certo tipo di “comunicazione” fra le piante: se un parassita attacca un pino in una foresta, la risposta immunitaria viene riscontrata contemporaneamente in tutto il bosco, e non soltanto nell’albero che è stato attaccato – la “notizia” dell’arrivo del nemico è stata in qualche modo segnalata al resto degli alberi. Prima di precipitarci a concludere che esiste un linguaggio delle piante, però, faremmo meglio a tenere i piedi a terra.

Le piante, come la maggior parte degli organismi, percepiscono il mondo attorno a loro, processano le informazioni che raccolgono e rispondono agli stimoli esterni alterando la propria crescita e il proprio sviluppo, e mettendo in atto tecniche e strategie di sopravvivenza a volte sorprendentemente sofisticate. Ancora oggi alcuni di questi processi rimangono effettivamente misteriosi. Ma Elizabeth Van Volkenburgh, botanica dell’Università di Washington, chiarisce una volta per tutte: “un grosso errore che fa la gente è parlare delle piante come se ‘sapessero’ cosa stanno facendo. Insegnanti di biologia, ricercatori, studenti e gente comune fanno tutti lo stesso sbaglio. Io preferirei dire che una pianta avverte e risponde, piuttosto che dire che ‘sa’. Usare parole come ‘intelligenza’ o ‘pensiero’ per le piante è un errore. Alle volte è divertente, un po’ provocatorio. Ma è scorretto.”

Quando parliamo di piante che riflettono, decidono, amano o soffrono, staremmo quindi commettendo l’errore di proiettare caratteristiche prettamente umane sui vegetali. Bisognerebbe forse pensare alle piante come a una specie aliena, con cui non è possibile adottare metri di misura umani: parlare di emozioni, ricordi, pensiero è illudersi che le nostre specifiche caratteristiche vadano bene per tutti gli esseri viventi, è voler vedere noi stessi in ciò che è diverso. Così, domandarsi se una pianta prova dolore è forse un quesito senza senso.

Per concludere, è buona norma prendere sempre con le pinze le divulgazioni spacciate per “clamorose scoperte”. Allo stesso tempo, se la prossima volta che affettate un pomodoro, cogliete una margherita o addentate una mela avrete un attimo di esitazione, o un leggero brivido… beh, qui a Bizzarro Bazar potremo ritenerci soddisfatti.

Ecco un articolo (in inglese) sul sito del Scientific American.

Metà animale, metà pianta

Abbiamo già parlato dell’agnello vegetale, fantasioso ibrido di pianta e mammifero. Ma se l’agnello vegetale è una leggenda fantastica, la Elysia chlorotica è realtà.

Questo mollusco marino, studiato per vent’anni da Sidney Pierce, biologo all’Università della Florida del Sud a Tampa, ha lasciato molti scienziati di stucco: la sua evoluzione l’ha portato infatti ad “appropriarsi” di un procedimento di nutrizione finora riscontrato esclusivamente nelle piante – la fotosintesi clorofilliana.

Non soltanto questa specie di lumaca dei fondali marini riesce a trasformare la luce del sole in energia (cosa che soltanto le piante sono in grado di fare), ma sembra che assuma questa facoltà dalle alghe che ingerisce.

Originari delle paludi salate del New England e del Canada, questi animali si sono appropriati dei geni responsabili della produzione di clorofilla presenti nelle alghe che costituiscono la loro dieta, assieme ad alcune parti di cellule chiamate cloroplasti. I progenitori hanno quindi passato questo patrimonio genetico alle nuove generazioni, in modo che basta a un nuovo nato un unico pasto di alghe per rubare i cloroplasti ed acquisire così questi incredibili “superpoteri”.

Raccolte e tenute in un acquario per mesi, le lumachine sono in grado di sopravvivere senza cibo, finché una luce assicura loro il giusto apporto energetico. Così, in mare, possono sopportare lunghe “carestie” di alghe semplicemente cibandosi dei raggi del sole. Che l’evoluzione fosse creativa e sorprendente si sapeva. Ma un animale che produce clorofilla e si comporta da pianta supera di gran lunga le aspettative degli scienziati più fantasiosi.

Ecco un articolo (in inglese) sulle stupefacenti proprietà dell’elysia chlorotica.