Bonehouse and Birdhouse: Birds That Nest in Human Skulls

Guest post by Thomas J. Farrow

The English term ‘bonehouse’, referring to an ossuary or charnel where large quantities of exhumed skeletal remains are stacked and displayed, derives from the Anglo-Saxon ‘beinhaus’. In its original use, this word referred to the human body rather than any structure as the house of bones. With the bones of the living inhabiting bodies and the bones of the dead inhabiting charnel houses, distinctions between life and death remain clear and accommodated. However, the emergence of animal life within the bones of the dead offers one further twist, repurposing bones as houses in and of themselves.

Reports of birds nesting in human skulls were surprisingly common in the 19th and early 20th centuries, attracting the attention of Victorian ornithologists and curiosity-seekers alike. Numerous reports survive through popular books and magazines of the period, including wrens nesting in a skull left outside to whiten by an anatomy student (Blanchan 1907), as well as one uncovered during building works at Hockwold Hall, Norfolk, during the 1870s (Chilvers 1877). Following its discovery, the Hockwold skull was hung from a nail on a potting shed wall by a local man, who was later surprised to find that a wren seen flying in and out of it had laid four or five eggs within.

Also in Norfolk, earlier in the century, birds were found nesting in the exposed skeletal remains of a local murderer. Following execution, the body was left to rot in a gibbet suspended outside the village of Wereham, serving as a grizzly warning to others who might threaten local lives. Around five years later, in 1810 or thereabouts, a child climbed the scaffold and discovered several blue-tits living within the skull (Stevenson 1876).

Though the Wereham gibbet is no longer extant, the surviving Rye gibbet shows how a skull would be retained. (Postcard. Author’s collection.)

Further accounts pepper books both historic and recent. When a Saxon cemetery was excavated at Saffron Walden during the 1870s, a Redstart raised four children in the skull of an exposed skeleton (Travis 1876). More recently, in an expedition to Cape Clear Island, Ireland, the ornithologist Ronald M. Lockley discovered a robin’s nest inside a skull within a ruined chapel, which had presumably tumbled from an old stone grave within the walls (Lockley 1983).

FIG 2: Illustration of a bird’s nest in a human skull, c.1906.

Skulls do not form the only morbid homes of nesting birds, with the Chinese Hoopoe, or coffin-bird, so named on account of its habit of nesting in caskets which were frequently left above-ground in 19th century China. Furthermore, the Arctic-dwelling Snow Bunting has been rumoured to seek shelter in the chest cavities of those unfortunate enough to die on the tundra (Dixon 1902). While nooks and crannies in modern cemeteries also provide helpful shelter in mortuary environments (Smith/Minor 2019), these nesting sites are not driven by any macabre mechanism. Rather, they express the versatile ability of birds to seek shelter wherever it might be conveniently found.

Birds nesting in locations as mundane as flowerpots and old boots (Kearton 1895), through to desiccated animal carcasses, including those of other birds (Armstrong 1955), demonstrate the indifferent resourcefulness of our feathered friends. It is therefore unsurprising that when skulls of the dead have been left exposed to the elements, they have occasionally provided shelter in much the same way as any other convenient object might. As charnels and ossuaries have historically accommodated large quantities of such remains, from time to time they have offered several such convenient homes for nesting birds.
Within England, two charnel collections remain extant. The first of these, at St. Leonard’s Church in Hythe, Kent, houses hundreds of skulls including one which contains a bird’s nest. The nest is rumoured to have been built in the mid-20th century after the church’s windows were shattered by a bomb which fell nearby in the Second World War, allowing birds to enter the structure (Caroline 2015).

FIG 3: The bird’s nest skull in St. Leonard’s, Hythe.

England’s second accessible charnel collection is located in the crypt of Holy Trinity Church in Rothwell, Northamptonshire. Newspapers in 1912 reported the discovery a nest in a skull there, which was believed to have been made by a bird who snuck into the crypt through a hole in a ventilator (Northampton Mercury 12.7.12). However, a lack of references in more recent sources suggest that the nest has not survived to the present day.
In Austria, the ossuary of Filialkirche St. Michael in der Wachau contains the remains of local people as well as soldiers who died during the 1805 Battle of Dürenstein (Engelbrecht). Several skulls bear bullet holes attesting death by conflict, while one with a large portion missing from its vault is displayed side-on to reveal the bird’s nest that it contains.

FIG 4: Nest skull at the Filialkirche St. Michael in der Wachau.

Further examples exist in the Breton region of North-Western France, where ossuaries were common until hygienic and cultural changes in the 19th and 20th centuries led to most of them being emptied. The ossuary of l’Église Saint-Grégoire in Lanrivain is one where bones still remain, with one skull there accommodating a nest.

FIG 5: Nest skull in Lanrivain Ossuary, Brittany.

A further example with a difference can be found in the ossuary of l’Église Saint-Fiacre. Within Breton ossuary practices, skulls were frequently retained separately from other remains in biographically inscribed boxes which recorded details of the deceased such as names and dates alongside invocations of prayer (Coughlin 2016). Boxes possessed viewing apertures which exposed the remains, as well as pitched roofs which led to 19th century travellers describing them as resembling dog kennels. However, one at Saint-Fiacre is decidedly distant from these canine comparisons, having been adopted and transformed into the uncanniest of birdhouses.

Ossuary in Saint-Fiacre. Source: Photos 2 Brehiz.

Birds are not the only animals to have found happy homes among charnel remains. In her book ‘A Tour of the Bones’, Denise Inge noted a mouse living in the ossuary of Hallstatt, Austria. More recently, rat bones in the ossuary of Gdańsk, Poland, have been used to shed new light on the dispersal of plague in medieval Europe (Morozova et al 2020). Plants as well as animals have their own established charnel histories too, with moss removed from human skulls finding historic employment within folk medicine as a cure for conditions of the head such as seizures and nosebleeds (Gerard 1636).

Fig 7: Medical moss on a human skull in the late 17th century.

While cemeteries have attracted increased attention in recent times as urban green spaces which accommodate and facilitate nature within settlements (Quinton/Duinker 2018), the study of charnel houses as ecosystems remains a further promising project which is yet to be conducted.

As most instances of birds nesting in ossuary skulls which have been described here were discovered accidentally during the course of broader research, it is inevitable that the present list remains incomplete. It is hoped that by bringing such examples together in one place, this strange phenomenon might receive recognition for the curiosity that it is, and that more instances might be noticed and added to the list. While it is widely seen that life often finds compelling ways to perpetuate among environments of the dead, nesting birds in ossuary skulls provide a particularly uncanny example – from bodies as the houses of bones, to bones as the houses of bodies.

______

Thomas J. Farrow (mailTwitter) holds an MA in the Archaeology of Death and Memory from the University of Chester, UK. A previous article on the history of charnelling in England may be found here (Farrow 2020), while a paper addressing folk medical and magical uses of skull moss and ossuary remains is forthcoming in the Spring 2021 issue of The Enquiring Eye

L’esperienza della meraviglia

cropped-skenny

Words Social Forum, il “Centro sociale dell’Arte”, è uno dei siti collettivi più ricchi e interessanti dedicati alla letteratura, l’arte, il cinema e la fotografia: ospita quotidianamente nuove interviste, recensioni, saggi e molto altro.

Oggi su WSF è stato pubblicato uno scritto inedito, firmato Bizzarro Bazar, che esplora brevemente il significato della meraviglia nella sua dimensione passata e odierna, quale momento fondante dell’essere umano:

[…] A cosa rimanda dunque il segno meraviglioso?
Rimanda proprio al sublime, all’ineffabile, al senso del mistero del cosmo che prova il bambino muto di fronte alla volta celeste; che lo si affronti in assenza o in compresenza di un’idea di Dio.
Tutto questo suggerisce come il sublime e la meraviglia possano essere visti come la vera e propria religione universale (da re-ligare), il legame che tiene assieme tutte le cose e tutti gli uomini senza punto conoscere epoca o latitudine, esperienza comune e fondante a prescindere da fedi, credenze, politiche culturali o sociali.
E per questo motivo occorre anche comprendere che la meraviglia è, e deve essere, come forse ogni religione, anche agghiacciante.

Potete leggere per intero L’esperienza della meraviglia a questa pagina.

La biblioteca delle meraviglie – IX

book_CW4258_1

S. Musitelli – M. Bossi – R. Allegri

STORIA DEI COSTUMI SESSUALI IN OCCIDENTE

(1999, Rusconi)

Quando Enkidu, l’animalesco “uomo primordiale” inviato dagli Dei, terrorizza le campagne con la sua bestiale presenza, contro di lui Gilgamesh non invia un esercito o degli assassini, bensì una prostituta. Arrivata nel luogo dove si trova Enkidu, la donna si spoglia e si offre alle sue voglie; Enkidu la possiede, e da quel momento le belve scappano da lui, le gazzelle si allontanano timorose – egli è divenuto umano, grazie alla prostituta che lo ha “civilizzato” tramite l’atto sessuale. È con questa orgogliosa rivendicazione del sesso come cultura prima ancora che natura che comincia l’affascinante storia della sessualità occidentale. Una storia piena di sorprese, a partire dall’antichità classica, greca e romana, molto differenti l’una dall’altra per abitudini e fissazioni erotiche, per poi continuare con l’età cristiana e la nascita della “repressione” della sessualità nel duplice Medioevo, fatto di amor cortese e cinture di castità, di peccati danteschi e delizie boccaccesche; passando poi per i libertini francesi, il Rinascimento che vede in ogni corte i “cornuti  indiavolati e i cornuti gentili”, ed arrivando infine alla liberazione sessuale degli anni ’70, il femminismo e l’orgoglio gay. Una storia della sessualità che è soprattutto storia dei costumi e della nostra stessa civiltà, perché perfino nel privato dell’alcova il modo in cui facciamo l’amore rispecchia i valori e gli ideali del nostro tempo.

$(KGrHqIOKpcE0VlgE7,,BN(OJp03z!~~_12[1]_1

Laura Monferdini

IL CANNIBALISMO

(2000, Xenia Edizioni)

Il tabù per eccellenza, eppure diffuso in tutto il mondo in diversi tempi e modalità, è senza dubbio la pratica di cibarsi della carne di un proprio simile. Questo atto, rivestito di significati magici, rituali e addirittura giuridici (quando ad esempio veniva imposto come pena), si disvela in tutta la sua complessità simbolica attraverso le pagine del libro di Laura Monferdini: di grande interesse, perché distanti dalla nostra sensibilità, sono ovviamente quelle società in cui l’antropofagia veniva accettata e praticata regolarmente. Privato dello status di tabù perché iscritto in un sistema culturale ed etnografico ben preciso, il cannibalismo può divenire di volta in volta un atto iniziatico, di rafforzamento della virtù, oppure legato alle festività per il raccolto, oppure ancora vero e proprio rito in onore del defunto, come nel caso della consumazione delle ceneri paterne (patrofagia). Dalle cerimonie di casta azteche agli indios Tupinamba, si arriva infine al cannibalismo profano e “impazzito” dei serial killer contemporanei, ma anche in questi permane un elemento di ritualità, seppure deviata e perversa. Perché in fondo mangiare la carne di un uomo è sempre atto magico, volto ad interiorizzare le qualità del defunto. E se credete che oggi il cannibalismo sia esclusivamente un delitto e non abbia più il valore simbolico di un tempo, ripensate a quello che fanno (metaforicamente) migliaia di persone durante la comunione cristiana.

La biblioteca delle meraviglie – V

Alberto Zanchetta

FRENOLOGIA DELLA VANITAS – Il teschio nelle arti visive

(2011, Johan & Levi)

Vita, miracoli e morte del teschio. Lo splendido volume di Alberto Zanchetta racconta la storia di una trasformazione. Attraverso un unico elemento simbolico, l’effigie del teschio nella storia dell’arte, e seguendone le mutazioni di senso e di significato nel corso dei secoli, ci parla di come la nostra stessa sensibilità abbia cambiato forma con il passare del tempo. Da icona funebre a dettaglio centrale delle vanitas, fino alla moderna ubiquità che ne fa vacua decorazione e ne appiattisce ogni forza oscena, il teschio ha accompagnato dalla preistoria fino ad oggi la nostra cultura: vero e proprio specchio, le cui orbite vuote fissano l’osservatore spingendolo a meditare sull’inesorabilità del tempo e sulla morte. Come si sono serviti gli artisti di questo prodigioso elemento iconografico? Quando e perché è cambiato il suo utilizzo dal Medioevo ad oggi? C’è il rischio che l’attuale proliferare indiscriminato dei teschi, dalla moda, ai tatuaggi, ai graffiti, possa renderli “innocui” e alla lunga privarci di un simbolo forte e antico quanto l’uomo? L’autore ripercorre questa particolare storia esaminando e approfondendo di volta in volta tematiche e autori distanti fra loro nel tempo e nello spazio: da Basquiat a Cézanne, da Picasso a Witkin, da Mapplethorpe a Hirst (per citarne solo alcuni). Abbiamo parlato di tanto in tanto, qui su Bizzarro Bazar, di come la morte sia stata negata e occultata nell’ultimo secolo in Occidente; e di come oggi la sua spettacolarizzazione tenda a renderla ancora meno reale, più immaginata, pensata cioè per immagini. Zanchetta aggiunge un tassello importante a questa idea, con il suo resoconto di un simbolo che era un tempo essenziale, e si presenta ormai stanco e abusato.

Bill Bass e Jon Jefferson

LA VERA FABBRICA DEI CORPI

(2006, TEA)

Non lasciatevi ingannare dalla fuorviante traduzione del titolo originale (che si riferisce invece alla “fattoria dei corpi”). Il libro di Bass e Jefferson non parla né di androidi né di clonazioni, ma della nascita e dello sviluppo della rete di cosiddette body farms americane, fondate dallo stesso Bass: strutture universitarie in cui si studia la decomposizione umana a fini scientifici e, soprattutto, forensici. Il lavoro e la specializzazione del professor Bass è infatti comprendere, a partire da resti umani, la data e/o l’ora esatta della morte, nonché le modalità del decesso. Per raggiungere la precisione necessaria a scagionare o accusare un imputato di omicidio, gli antropologi forensi hanno dovuto comprendere a fondo come si “comporta” un cadavere in tutte le situazioni immaginabili, come reagisce agli elementi esterni, quale fauna entomologica si ciba dei resti e in quale successione temporale si avvicendano le ondate di larve e insetti. Nelle body farms, un centinaio di cadaveri all’anno vengono lasciati alle intemperie, bruciati, immersi nell’acqua, nel ghiaccio… Negli anni il dottor Bass ha ottenuto una serie di risultati decisivi per far luce su innumerevoli misteri, confluiti in un archivio consultato da tutte le polizie del mondo. Questo simpatico vecchietto oggi, guardando i resti di un cadavere, riesce a capire in breve tempo come è morto, se è stato spostato dopo la morte, da quanto tempo, eccetera.

Questo libro è uno di quelli che si leggono tutti d’un fiato, e per più di un motivo. Innanzitutto, lo stile scorrevole e semplice degli autori non è privo di una buona dose di umorismo, che aiuta a “digerire” anche i dettagli più macabri. In secondo luogo, le informazioni scientifiche sono precise e sorprendenti: non potremmo immaginare in quanti e quali modi un cadavere possa “mentire” riguardo alle sue origini, finché Bass non ci confessa tutte le false piste in cui è caduto, gli errori commessi, le situazioni senza apparente spiegazione in cui si è ritrovato. Perché La vera fabbrica dei corpi è anche un libro giallo, a suo modo, e racconta le investigazioni svoltesi in diversi casi celebri di cronaca nera. E, infine, il grande valore di queste pagine è quello di raccontarci una vita avventurosa, strana e particolare, di caccia ai killer, in stretto contatto quotidiano con la morte; la vita di un uomo che dichiara di conoscere ormai fin troppo bene il suo destino, e dice di trovare conforto nell’idea che, una volta morto, vivrà negli esseri che si sfameranno con il suo corpo. Un uomo dalla voce ironica e pacata che, nonostante tutti questi anni, continua “ad odiare le mosche”.