Links, Curiosities & Mixed Wonders – 15

  • Cogito, ergo… memento mori“: this Descartes plaster bust incorporates a skull and detachable skull cap. It’s part of the collection of anatomical plasters of the École des Beaux-Arts in Paris, and it was sculpted in 1913 by Paul Richer, professor of artistic anatomy born in Chartres. The real skull of Descartes has a rather peculiar story, which I wrote about years ago in this post (Italian only).
  • A jarring account of a condition which you probably haven’t heard of: aphantasia is the inability of imagining and visualizing objects, situations, persons or feelings with the “mind’s eye”. The article is in Italian, but there’s also an English Wiki page.
  • 15th Century: reliquaries containing the Holy Virgin’s milk are quite common. But Saint Bernardino is not buying it, and goes into a enjoyable tirade:
    Was the Virgin Mary a dairy cow, that she left behind her milk just like beasts let themselves get milked? I myself hold this opinion, that she had no more and no less milk than what fitted inside that blessed Jesus Christ’s little mouth.

  • In 1973 three women and five men feigned hallucinations to find out if psychiatrists would realize that they were actually mentally healthy. The result: they were admitted in 12 different hospitals. This is how the pioneering Rosenhan experiment shook the foundations of psychiatric practice.
  • Can’t find a present for your grandma? Ronit Baranga‘s tea sets may well be the perfect gift.

  • David Nebreda, born in 1952, was diagnosed with schizophrenia at the age of 19. Instead of going on medication, he retired as a hermit in a two-room apartment, without much contact with the outside world, practicing sexual abstinence and fasting for long periods of time. His only weapon to fight his demons is a camera: his self-portraits undoubtedly represent some kind of mental hell — but also a slash of light at the end of this abyss; they almost look like they capture an unfolding catharsis, and despite their extreme and disturbing nature, they seem to celebrate a true victory over the flesh. Nebreda takes his own pain back, and trascends it through art. You can see some of his photographs here and here.
  • The femme fatale, dressed in glamourous clothes and diabolically lethal, is a literary and cinematographic myth: in reality, female killers succeed in becoming invisible exactly by playing on cultural assumptions and keeping a low and sober profile.
  • Speaking of the female figure in the collective unconscious, there is a sci-fi cliché which is rarely addressed: women in test tubes. Does the obsessive recurrence of this image point to the objectification of the feminine, to a certain fetishism, to an unconscious male desire to constrict, seclude and dominate women? That’s a reasonable suspicion when you browse the hundred-something examples harvested on Sci-Fi Women in Tubes. (Thanks, Mauro!)

  • I have always maintained that fungi and molds are superior beings. For instance the slimy organisms in the pictures above, called Stemonitis fusca, almost seem to defy gravity. My first article for the magazine Illustrati, years ago, was  dedicated to the incredible Cordyceps unilateralis, a parasite which is able to control the mind and body of its host. And I have recently stumbled upon a photograph that shows what happens when a Cordyceps implants itself within the body of a tarantula. Never mind Cthulhu! Mushrooms, folks! Mushrooms are the real Lords of the Universe! Plus, they taste good on a pizza!

  • The latest entry in the list of candidates for my Museum of Failure is Adelir Antônio de Carli from Brazil, also known as Padre Baloeiro (“balloon priest”). Carli wished to raise funds to build a chapel for truckers in Paranaguá; so, as a publicity stunt, on April 20, 2008, he tied a chair to 1000 helium-filled balloons and took off before journalists and a curious crowd. After reaching an altitude of 6,000 metres (19,700 ft), he disappeared in the clouds.
    A month and a half passed before the lower part of his body was found some 100 km off the coast.

  • La passionata is a French song covered by Guy Marchand which enjoyed great success in 1966. And it proves two surprising truths: 1- Latin summer hits were already a thing; 2- they caused personality disorders, as they still do today. (Thanks, Gigio!)

  • Two neuroscientists build some sort of helmet which excites the temporal lobes of the person wearing it, with the intent of studying the effects of a light magnetic stimulation on creativity.  And test subjects start seeing angels, dead relatives, and talking to God. Is this a discovery that will explain mystical exstasy, paranormal experiences, the very meaning of the sacred? Will this allow communication with an invisible reality? Neither of the two, because the truth is a bit disappointing: in all attempts to replicate the experiment, no peculiar effects were detected. But it’s still a good idea for a novel. Here’s the God helmet Wiki page.
  • California Institute of Abnormalarts is a North Hollywood sideshow-themed nightclub featuring burlesque shows, underground musical groups, freak shows and film screenings. But if you’re afraid of clowns, you might want to steer clear of the place: one if its most famous attractions is the embalmed body of Achile Chatouilleu, a clown who asked to be buried in his stage costume and makeup.
    Sure enough, he seems a bit too well-preserved for a man who allegedly died in 1912 (wouldn’t it happen to be a sideshow gaff?). Anyways, the effect is quite unsettling and grotesque…

  • I shall leave you with a picture entitled The Crossing, taken by nature photographer Ryan Peruniak. All of his works are amazing, as you can see if you head out to his official website, but I find this photograph strikingly poetic.
    Here is his recollection of that moment:
    Early April in the Rocky Mountains, the majestic peaks are still snow-covered while the lower elevations, including the lakes and rivers have melted out. I was walking along the riverbank when I saw a dark form lying on the bottom of the river. My first thought was a deer had fallen through the ice so I wandered over to investigate…and that’s when I saw the long tail. It took me a few moments to comprehend what I was looking at…a full grown cougar lying peacefully on the riverbed, the victim of thin ice.

Automi & Androidi

La storia degli automi meccanici si perde nella notte dei tempi, e non è nostra intenzione affrontarla in maniera sistematica o esaustiva. È interessante però notare che nella Grecia classica, così come nella Cina antica, l’ingegneria meccanica era forse più avanzata di quanto non sostenga la storia ufficiale. Gli archeologi sono sempre più aperti alla nozione di scienza perduta – vale a dire una conoscenza già raggiunta in tempi antichi e poi, per cause diverse, persa e “riscoperta” in tempi più recenti. Meccanismi come quello celebre di Anticitera sono “sorprese” archeologiche che fanno soppesare daccapo l’avanzamento tecnologico di alcuni nostri antenati così come è stato supposto fino ad ora (senza peraltro arrivare alle fantasiose ipotesi extraterrestri o a ingenue rivisitazioni esoteriche o new-age delle epoche passate).

Nonostante quindi ci sia pervenuta voce di automi meccanici complessi e realistici da epoche e regioni non sospette, i primi veri robot storicamente documentati risalgono ai primi del 1200 in Medioriente, e sono attribuiti al genio ingegneristico dello scienziato, artista e inventore Al-Jazari. Per intrattenere gli ospiti alle feste, si dice avesse creato una piccola nave con quattro automi musicisti che suonavano e si muovevano realisticamente; un altro suo automa aveva un meccanismo simile alle nostre moderne toilette: ci si lavava le mani in una bacinella e, tirata una leva, l’acqua veniva scaricata e il meccanismo dalle avvenenti forme di ancella riempiva nuovamente la vaschetta. (E le meraviglie inventate da questo genio non si fermavano qui).

Tra i molti inventori che misero a punto automi meccanici, fra Cina, Medioriente e Occidente, spicca anche il nostro Leonardo da Vinci, che aveva progettato un cavaliere in armatura semovente, destinato forse al divertimento per i nobili invitati ai simposi.

Nel Rinascimento, ogni wunderkammer che si rispettasse ospitava qualche automa pneumatico, idraulico o meccanico: nobiluomini di latta che fumavano, dame metalliche che cantavano, cigni e pavoni meccanici che si muovevano e drizzavano il piumaggio. Jacques de Vaucanson (inventore del telaio automatico, così come di molti altri meccanismi tutt’oggi adoperati negli utensili domestici) costruì un’anitra di metallo che ad oggi resta un automa insuperato per complessità. L’anatra poteva bere acqua con il becco, mangiare semi di grano e replicare il processo di digestione in una camera speciale, visibile agli spettatori; ognuna delle sue ali conteneva quattrocento parti in movimento, che potevano simulare alla perfezione tutte le movenze di un’anatra vera.

Nel ‘700 gli automi erano una moda e un’ossessione per molti inventori. Il loro successo non accennò mai a declinare anche nel secolo successivo. Ma da semplici curiosità o giocattoli automatizzati sarebbero divenuti molto più intriganti con l’avvento, nella seconda metà del XX secolo, delle nuove tecnologie, dell’informatica e del concetto di robot  portato avanti dalla fantascienza.

Con l’affermarsi della cibernetica e della robotica, gli automi meccanici fecero il grande passo. Autori di science-fiction quali Asimov, Bradbury, e poi Dick, Gibson e tutta la stirpe degli scrittori cyberpunk ne celebrarono il potenziale destabilizzante. Abbiamo già parlato del concetto di Uncanny Valley, ovvero quel punto esatto in cui l’automa diviene un po’ troppo simile all’essere umano, e suscita un sentimento di paura e repulsione. Gli autori di fantascienza del ‘900, trovatisi per primi a confrontarsi con i prototipi di computer in grado di tener testa a un esperto giocatore di scacchi, o alle primissime generazioni di robot capaci di azioni complesse, non potevano che descrivere un’umanità minacciata da una “presa di controllo” da parte delle macchine. Una visione piuttosto ingenua e “antica”, forse, vista alla luce della nostra realtà in cui i computer ci aiutano, ci connettono e ci sostengono in modo così pervasivo. Eppure…

…eppure. Ecco le domande interessanti. A che punto siamo oggi con gli androidi (così vengono chiamati i moderni automi)? A che livello sono giunti gli scienziati? Quali sono le novità che gli ingegneri sfoggiano alle mostre e alle convention? Ci fanno ancora paura questi esseri automatizzati che simulano le espressioni e i movimenti umani? Il fascino degli automi, e le domande che ci pongono, divengono sempre più concreti. Se fra qualche anno vi trovaste a chiedere informazioni a una signorina seduta dietro a un bancone della reception, e scopriste dopo poco che vi trovate davanti a un perfetto automa, la cosa vi darebbe fastidio? Donare un’identità sempre più definita a una macchina, confondere l’organico e il meccanico, è davvero uno scandalo, come preconizzavano gli autori di fantascienza del secolo scorso? Può davvero un automa troppo umano far vacillare la nostra sicurezza, perché toglie qualcosa alla nostra stessa unicità? Potete decidere voi stessi, dando un’occhiata a questi recenti video.

[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cFVlzUAZkHY]

[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rtuioXKssyA]

[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MY8-sJS0W1I]