The Ouija Sessions Ep.4: Joseph Pujol

In the new video of The Ouija Sessions I tell you about the amazing career of Joseph Pujol aka Le Pétomane, fart artist at the Moulin Rouge.

(Turn on Eng Subs!)

Hypnotism At The Morgue

Part I: Deadly trance

November 8, 1909, Somerville Opera House, New Jersey.
Professor Arthur Everton was a man of gentle manners, with a suave voice and a nice pair of black mustaches. Hypnotism was his early passion, and after a period spent moving pianos he had recently returned to the limelight. But he hadn’t lost his shine: he was dominating the scene with grace and security.
His evening show was coming to an end; until that moment the hypnotist had amused the audience by forcing his subjects to fish onstage with an invisible fishing line, and other such amenities. But now he announced the grand finale.

There was electricity in the room as his magnetic eyes scrutinized the audience intensely, one row at a time, searching for the subject of his next experiment. And the public, as always in these cases, was torn.
There were some, among the spectators and the spectators, who timidly lowered their eyes for fear of being called on stage, having no intention of becoming the laughing stock. Others, on the other hand, secretly hoped to be chosen: either they thought they were lucid enough to challenge the Professor, to resist the hypnotist’s intense willpower… or they were unconsciously enticed by the idea of losing control for a few minutes, just for fun, with no major consequences.
Finally, a man raised his hand.
“Ah, we have a volunteer!”, shouted Everton.

35-year-old Robert Simpson, a tall, bulky man, climbed on stage. Professor Everton let the audience give a round of applause to this brave stranger, and then proceeded to induce a cataleptic state. According to the New York Times

he made a few passes, told Simpson to be rigid, and he was. Everton then had attendants lay the body on two chairs, the head resting on one and the feet on the other, and stepped up on the subject’s stomach and then down again. Two attendants, acting under his orders, lifted Simpson to a standing posture, and Everton, clapping his hands, cried out ‘Relax!’
Simpson’s body softened so suddenly that it slipped out of the hands of the attendants to the floor, his head striking one of the chairs as he slid down.

Everyone immediately understood, just by looking at the assistants’ astonished faces, that this was no set-up. Professor Everton — who was actually not a real professor — began panicking at this point. He and his collaborators tried to awaken the unfortunate man from the trance, shaking him in every way, but the man did not respond to any stimulus.
Everton, ever more hysterical, managed to squeak out a cry for help asking if there were any doctors in the room. Three physicians, who had been invited to the show by the theater manager, came to the rescue; but even their attempts to revive Simpson were unsuccessful. Dr. W. H. Long, county physician, looked up from the body and stared seriously at the hypnotist.
“This one’s gone,” he hissed.
“No, he’s still in a trance,” Everton replied, and began clapping his hands near Simpson’s ears, and shaking the man’s corpse.

When the police showed up, Professor Everton was still intent on trying to awaken his volunteer. The cops arrested him immediately on charges of manslaughter.
As they carried him out of the Opera House, handcuffed, his eyes no longer seemed so magnetic, but only terrified.

Part II: Lazarus, Come Forth

The next day, Robert Simpson’s lifeless body lay under a black shroud in Somerville’s hospital morgue, awaiting the autopsy.
Suddenly the door opened and four men entered the mortuary. Three of them were doctors.
The fourth approached the corpse and uncoverd it. Breathing deeply, he first touched the dead man’s cheeks; then he brought his head close to Simpson’s chest as if to auscultate him. No heartbeat. Finally he gently placed three fingers on the cold skin over the breastbone, put his lips to the dead man’s ear and began to speak.
“Listen, Bob, your heart action is strong, Bob, your heart begins to beat.”
Then he suddenly started screaming, “BOB, DO YOU HEAR ME?”
The three doctors exchanged a puzzled look.
The man’s voice resumed whispering: “Bob, your heart is starting …”
Simpson, lying on the table, did not move.

This strange scene continued for quite a while, until the impatient doctors decided the farce had lasted too long.
“Mr. Davenport, I’d say that’s enough.”
“But we’re almost there…”
“Enough.”

Part III: Death Is Not The End

The man trying to resurrect the dead was named William E. Davenport, and was a friend of Professor Everton (they were both from Newark). Davenport officially held the office of secretary for the mayor, but also dabbled in hypnotism and mesmerism.
The self-proclaimed ‘Professor’, “unnerved and shaken“, remained in prison awaiting the decision of the grand jury. Everton claimed — and perhaps he desperately wanted to convince himself — that he had thrown his subject into a trance so deep as to resemble a state of apparent death. He was so sure Simpson was still in catalepsy, that he had managed to convince authorities to grant him that bizarre attempt at hypnotic resuscitation. Being confined to his cell, he had sent his friend Davenport to the morgue instead.

Unfortunately the latter (maybe because he was just an amateur?) had failed to awaken the dead. For a brief moment there was talk of summoning a third hypnotist from New York to try and bring the victim back to life, but nothing was done.
Thus it remained unclear whether Simpson had died from the weight he suffered while in a cataleptic state, as the hypnotist was climbing on his stomach, or if the whole incident was just a tragic coincidence.
The autopsy put an end to the suspense: Simpson had died of an aortic rupture, and according to the doctors he had likely been suffering from that silent aneurysm for a long time. There was no conclusive evidence that the stress endured during the hypnotism was the actual cause of death, which was eventually ruled out as natural.

Everton, now in full nervous breakdown in his cell, even after the autopsy kept claiming that Simpson was still alive. He was released on bail, and three weeks later the grand jury decided not to indict him.
It was the end of a nightmare for Professor Everton, who retired from the scenes, and the closure of a case that had kept newspaper readers with bated breath — and especially other hypnotists. After all, this could have happened to any of them.

But hypnotists were not damaged by this clamor, on the contrary; they acquired an even more sinister and provocative charm. And they continued, as they did before, to challenge each other with increasingly spectacular performances.
As early as November 11, just three days after Everton’s unfortunate act, a New York Times headline reported:

EVERTON’S RIVAL TRIUMPHS: Somerville’s Other Hypnotist Puts THREE Men on His Subject’s Chest.

The show, as they say, must go on.

Stupire! – The Festival of Wonders

There are places where the sediments of Time deposited, through the centuries, making the atmosphere thick and stratified like the different, subsequent architectural elements one can detect within a single building: in these places, the past never seems to have disappeared, it seems to survive — or at least we believe we can feel its vestigial traces.

Rocca Sanvitale in Fontanellato (Parma) is one of such majestic places of wonder: it has been the scene of conspiracies, battles, sieges, as well as — certainly — of laughters, romance, banquets and joy; a place full of art (Parmigianino was summoned to paint the fresco in the Room of Diane and Actaeon in 1523) and science (at the end of XIX Century the count Giovanni Sanvitale installed an incredible optical chamber inside the South tower, a device still functioning today).
Here, History is something you breathe. Walking through the rooms of the castle, you wouldn’t be surprised to encounter one of those faded ghosts who incessantly repeat the same gesture, trapped in a sadness deeper than death itself.

And it’s right inside these walls and towers that the first edition of Stupire!, the Festival of Wonders, will be held: three days of surprising shows, workshops, experiments, meetings with mentalists and mad scientists. The purpose of the event is to spread culture in entertaining and unexpected ways, using the tools of illusionism.

Behind this initiative, supported by the municipality of Fontanellato and organized in collaboration with the  Circolo Amici della Magia di Torino, are two absolutely extraordinary minds: Mariano Tomatis and Francesco Busani.

If you follow my blog, you may already know them: they appeared on these pages more than once, and they both performed at my Academy of Enchantment.
Mariano Tomatis (one of my personal heroes) is the fertile wonder injector who is revolutionizing the world of magic from the outside, so to speak. Half historian of illusionism, half philosopher of wonder, and for another additional half activist of enchantment, Mariano fathoms the psychological, sociological and political implications of the art of magic, succeeding in shifting its focal point towards a new balance. Starting from this year, his Blog of Wonders is twinned to Bizzarro Bazar.
If Mariano is the “theorist” of the duo, Francesco Busani is the true mentalist, experienced in bizarre magick, investigator of the occult and unrivaled raconteur. As he explained when I interviewed him months ago, he was among the first magicians to perform one-to-one mentalism in Italy.
This partnership has already given birth to Project Mesmer, a hugely successful mentalism workshop. The Stupire! festival is the crowning result of this collaboration, perhaps their most visionary endeavour.

I will have the honor of opening the Festival, together with Mariano, on May 19.
During our public meeting I will talk about collecting curiosities, macabre objects, ancient cabinets of wonder and neo-wunderkammern. I will also bring some interesting pieces, directly from my own collection.

In the following days, besides Busani’s and Tomatis’ amazing talks performances (you really need to see them to understand how deep they can reach through their magic), the agenda features: Diego Allegri‘s trickeries and shadow puppets, street magic by Hyde, Professor Alchemist and his crazy experiments; Gianfranco Preverino, among the greatest experts in gambling and cheating, will close the festival.
But the event will not be limited to the inside of the castle. On Saturday and Sunday, the streets of Fontanellato will become the scene for the unpredictable guerrilla magic of the group Double Joker Face: surprise exhibitions in public spaces, baffling bystanders.
If that wasn’t enough, all day long on Saturday and Sunday, just outside the Rocca, those who seek forgotten oddities will have a chance to sift through a magic and antique market.

Lastly, Mariano Tomatis’ motto “Magic to the People!” will result in a final, very welcome abracadabra: all the events you just read about will be absolutely free of charge (until seats are available).
Three days of culture, illusionism and wonder in a place where, as we said in the beginning, History is all around. A week-end that will undoubtedly leave the participants with more enchanted eyes.
Because the world does not need more magic, but our own gaze does.

Here you can find the detailed schedule, complete with links to reserve seats for free.

Speciale: Francesco Busani

Sono ormai diversi anni che mi interesso di illusionismo.
Intendiamoci, non ho neanche mai provato a far sparire un fazzoletto: quello che mi intriga è la portata simbolica del gioco di prestigio, lo scarto di prospettiva che opera, ma soprattutto il potere performativo di rendere instabile il confine tra realtà e finzione. La capacità dell’illusionista di toglierci il terreno sotto i piedi senza ricorrere a tanti giri di parole teorici, con un semplice gesto.
Eppure più si studia, più ci si accorge che a rendere possibile la magia è ancora e sempre la storia che si sta raccontando. Che sia sotterranea o esplicita, la narrativa rimane il vero meccanismo dell’incanto (o dell’inganno).

Quando il mentalista Francesco Busani ha accettato di partecipare all’inaugurazione dell’Accademia dell’Incanto, ho studiato la sua performance nei minimi dettagli.
Non tanto per scoprire i suoi trucchi — esercizio tutto sommato sterile e destinato alla delusione, perché come insegna Teller, “il segreto più grande dietro la messa in scena di un effetto magico che inganni in modo efficace è quello di realizzarlo con un metodo il più brutto possibile”.
No, il suo trucco migliore lo conoscevo già: sapevo che, prima di tutto, Busani è un eccezionale storyteller (uno storyteller “con gli effetti speciali”, come ama definirsi). Così mi sono concentrato sul modo in cui egli tirava i fili della sua narrazione. E sono rimasto con un sorriso stampato sul volto per l’intero show.
Perché durante un suo spettacolo succede qualcosa di strano: tutti ci rendiamo conto razionalmente che le storie fantastiche che Busani racconta sono, almeno in parte, frutto di fantasia; ma non sappiamo fino a che punto, e ci accorgiamo con sorpresa che esiste un’incontrollabile parte di noi che è disposta a crederci.

Un solo esempio: Busani ha raccontato la storia di due monete seppellite per anni assieme a un morto, sugli occhi del cadavere. Con l’aiuto di una spettatrice che si è offerta volontaria dal pubblico, in una routine che non vi svelo, le monete hanno dimostrato di aver acquisito virtù esoteriche e misteriose, a causa del prolungato contatto con la salma.
A colpirmi non è stato soltanto l’effetto finale, pure strabiliante, bensì un altro dettaglio a cui magari pochi hanno prestato attenzione: a chiusura del suo gioco, Francesco ha consegnato le monete nel palmo della spettatrice, e quest’ultima con uno scatto immediato e del tutto involontario ha tirato indietro le mani per non toccarle.

Ecco, quando quelle due monete sono cadute rumorosamente sul tavolo ho compreso quale eccezionale narratore fosse Francesco Busani.

Gran parte del fascino deriva proprio dal fatto che egli fa il “verso”, per così dire, a medium e sensitivi. Possiamo guardare con superiorità chi si affida a cartomanti e maghi, ma con un semplice gioco di prestigio raccontato nella giusta maniera Busani ci dimostra quanto il mito sia ancora intrinsecamente e inconsciamente efficace sulla nostra mente. E non è solo una lezione di umiltà: è anche a suo modo un tributo alla potenza della sconfinata fantasia umana.

Non mi sono dunque lasciato sfuggire l’occasione, la mattina successiva, di fargli qualche domanda in più sulla sua professione.

Partiamo dalla domanda inevitabile: quando e come hai cominciato a interessarti al paranormale da una parte, e all’illusionismo dall’altra?

Il mio è un percorso piuttosto anomalo per un mentalista.  Non mi sono formato nei club magici o negli ambienti dove si ritrovano i prestigiatori, ma arrivo del mondo della ricerca sul paranormale e sull’occulto, che ho coltivato fin da quando, a circa 12 anni, mi sono spaventato durante una seduta spiritica. In quel momento ho capito che l’unico modo per esorcizzare le mie paure era capire se potevano realmente esistere sistemi per contattare l’aldilà.
Successivamente mi sono interessato anche alle facoltà ESP, a figure di sensitivi e medium e ai casi di cronaca misteriosi. Durante tutti questi anni ho visitato luoghi infestati, cimiteri, castelli, ho visto all’opera sensitivi, cartomanti e anche qualche medium. Ho partecipato a ritiri spirituali, ascoltato decine di testimonianze relative a situazioni paranormali, letto centinaia di libri scritti sia da scettici che da believer. Visto che la maggior parte delle persone di cui sentivo o leggevo le testimonianze erano in buona fede, ho cominciato a chiedermi come mai io, assieme ad altre migliaia di ricercatori, non riuscissi a verificare alcunché di particolare.
Questo percorso è proseguito in parallelo con quello religioso di cattolico praticante fino ai ventiquattro anni, quando sono giunto alla conclusione che non esistono prove oggettive e scientifiche di fenomenologie paranormali. In quel preciso momento mi sono staccato anche dal percorso religioso che avevo mantenuto fino a quel momento solo per motivi sociali.
Infine ho scoperto che esistevano illusionisti che, utilizzando perlopiù tecniche derivate dai medium, “simulavano” i prodigi delle sedute spiritiche. Da lì al mentalismo il passo è stato breve.

Ti definisci “scettico al 100%”, eppure a fini scenici utilizzi tutto l’armamentario simbolico dell’occultismo e del paranormale. Non c’è una contraddizione?

Essere scettici e mentalisti non è per nulla un contraddizione: anzi forse è vero il contrario. I più grandi performer, da Derren Brown a Silvan solo per citarne due conosciuti in Italia, sono dichiaratamente scettici. E d’altronde se qualcuno possedesse doti paranormali, non avrebbe bisogno né di definirsi mentalista, né di mantenere il segreto sulle sue tecniche… né probabilmente di esibirsi per soldi!
La mia scelta stilistica, nella maggior parte dei miei spettacoli, è quella di utilizzare contesti e narrazioni che richiamano il mondo dell’occulto e dello spiritismo. Il mentalista è un intrattenitore – non dimentichiamolo – e la sua performance consiste nel sospendere l’incredulità nello spettatore. Questo processo avviene per gradi.
All’inizio di un mio show lo spettatore è cosciente che sta assistendo ad uno spettacolo. Poi, passo dopo passo, uso varie tecniche ed effetti per traghettare lo spettatore verso uno stato di dubbio sempre più profondo, fino a quando non è più in grado di capire dove finisce la finzione e inizia la realtà.

Nei tuoi spettacoli ti poni in maniera radicalmente differente rispetto ai classici mentalisti che sfoggiano “superpoteri” e abilità psichiche sovrumane: spesso si ha la sensazione che tu voglia rimanere un po’ in disparte, come se la tua funzione fosse quella del catalizzatore e del testimone di eventi inspiegabili, piuttosto che il loro diretto artefice. In altre parole, eviti programmaticamente l’effetto “et voilà!”.
Quanto è difficile per un performer questa rimozione dell’ego? Non rischia di diminuire l’impatto dei tuoi trucchi?

Penso che il mentalismo raggiunga il suo effetto più dirompente quando è il pubblico stesso a realizzare dei prodigi. Lo spettatore si aspetta che un illusionista possa stupirlo, ma non che sarà stupito da se stesso.
Questo scarto, seppure non sempre attuabile, è a parer mio l’ultimo gradino della trasmissione della meraviglia al pubblico, quello più alto. Infatti io spesso ci arrivo per gradi. Ad esempio in uno spettacolo scritto da me e dall’amico Luca Speroni, abile mentalista e copywriter, accadeva che ogni effetto magico fosse un passo per far acquisire al pubblico (tutto il pubblico in sala!) i poteri tipici delle guaritrici magiche che ancora oggi esistono nell’Appennino Tosco-Emiliano. Attraverso alcuni riti e un percorso ascetico ogni spettatore che saliva sul palco si trovava ad avere questi poteri sempre più amplificati.
Oppure prendi il mio intervento durante una conferenza/spettacolo con il collettivo Wu Ming e Mariano Tomatis (esiste un video della performance su YouTube): sono riuscito a far gridare a tutto il pubblico una parola che lo spettatore sul palcoscenico aveva soltanto pensato. L’effetto è stato stranissimo: le persone tra il pubblico si guardavano l’un l’altro divertite e si chiedevano come potesse essere accaduto.
Detto questo, non esiste un “modo corretto” per trasmettere lo stupore al pubblico: ogni performer deve trovare il proprio. Il mentalista-superuomo in determinati casi potrebbe far pesare troppo la sua abilità e risultare altezzoso, ma è anche vero che ci sono colleghi preparatissimi che rivestono in modo magistrale il personaggio del mentalista con poteri da X-Men.
Dipende anche dalla situazione. Lo spostamento dell’attenzione sullo spettatore funziona bene con un pubblico non troppo numeroso, ma spesso di fronte a platee più ampie, ad esempio negli spettacoli aziendali, rimango invece vestito dell’abito tipico del mentalista.

Al di là dei tuoi spettacoli di bizarre magic, hai sviluppato un’originale declinazione di mentalismo one-to-one. Come cambia il tuo lavoro quando ti trovi di fronte a un solo spettatore? Quali libertà ti puoi permettere, e a quali devi rinunciare?

Amo in particolar modo il contesto one-to-one, mi consente di esibirmi in ambienti e ambiti in cui spesso sarebbe impossibile realizzare uno spettacolo. Lavorare davanti a un solo spettatore è una bella sfida, sia psicologicamente che tecnicamente: sono indispensabili grande empatia, capacità di improvvisazione e sicurezza. La libertà che ti puoi permettere è quella di “affidare” allo spettatore stesso una parte dell’effetto, vale a dire che è lui che ne elabora e ne gestisce il senso, il significato speciale che un gioco può ricoprire rispetto alla sua sfera personale. Di contro, parlavamo di egocentrismo del performer: ecco, nel one-to-one devi assolutamente scordartelo, va messo da parte e soprattutto dal punto di vista etico bisogna rinunciare alla tentazione del potere quasi illimitato che quel ruolo, in quel momento, ti consentirebbe di avere.

Nel libro Magia a tu per tu racconti nel dettaglio come sei arrivato a costruire i tuoi effetti migliori, e in generale risulta evidente il perfezionismo nello studiare ogni minimo dettaglio della performance. Ti spingi perfino a dare suggerimenti minuziosi sulla logistica, su come posizionare o preparare la scena, eccetera. Eppure una delle cose che mi ha più colpito sono i passaggi in cui, di contro, parli dell’importanza dell’improvvisazione: quei preziosi momenti in cui – magari per quello che potrebbe sembrare a prima vista un incredibile colpo di fortuna – il numero travalica l’intento originario, e diventa qualcosa di più, sorprendendo perfino te stesso. Questo tipo di “fiuto” che ti permette di volgere la casualità a tuo favore, ho il sospetto che nasca proprio dalla meticolosità della preparazione, dall’esperienza. In che misura lasci la porta aperta all’imprevisto?

Un mentalista deve saper cogliere ogni situazione che si crea durante la performance, e volgerla a proprio favore. Non di rado, sia sul palco che in one-to-one, un’informazione ricevuta dallo spettatore permette di creare una variazione che risulta molto più potente dell’effetto magico programmato che, a quel punto, passa in secondo piano e può essere accantonato.
Chiaramente ogni improvvisazione, sia in ambito musicale che teatrale o illusionistico, necessita di una perfetta conoscenza della materia: da qui la maniacale preparazione di tutta l’impalcatura che deve sorreggere una mia performance.
Questa caratteristica di cambiare repentinamente traiettoria è anche una delle differenze che si notano tra gli illusionisti ed i sensitivi: i primi solitamente propongono allo spettatore uno schema che rimane invariato indipendentemente da ciò che lo spettatore comunica (volontariamente o involontariamente). Al contrario i sensitivi, dai quali io prendo ispirazione, sono estremamente opportunisti e se colgono uno spiraglio da cui possono trarre maggior stupore lo utilizzano al volo. Certo, è molto meno faticoso proporre una routine magica in modo “meccanico”, ma penso che la seconda strada porti a risultati eccezionali, e regali grande soddisfazione anche allo spettatore.

Qual è il tuo consiglio d’oro per qualcuno che volesse muovere i primi passi sulla strada del mentalismo?

Vorresti conseguire il brevetto di volo in una scuola dove nessun insegnante ha mai volato? Piuttosto rischioso… Eppure in questi anni ho visto nascere corsi di mentalismo tenuti da performer che non hanno mai fatto uno show in vita loro. Analoga situazione per i libri e i corsi online: hanno la pretesa di spiegare tecniche ed effetti, ma del loro ideatore non trovi traccia. Hai un bel cercare uno show del “docente” per andare a vederlo in scena, è tutto inutile: mai una foto di lui sul palco, mai una recensione. Ecco perché consiglio di frequentare lezioni e corsi tenuti di mentalisti che lavorano sul serio a contatto con il pubblico, che fanno davvero spettacolo.
Diverso è il discorso per i libri di storia dell’illusionismo, di storytelling e di principi generali: in Italia abbiamo scrittori riconosciuti in tutto il mondo, uno per tutti Mariano Tomatis che con il suo ambizioso progetto Mesmer – Lezioni di mentalismo ha realizzato una vera e propria enciclopedia relativa alla storia del mentalismo partendo dal ‘700.

Anche il mestiere ideale ha sempre qualche lato frustrante. C’è qualche aspetto del tuo lavoro che proprio non ti va giù?

La frustrazione inizia quando non si è più in grado di esprimere se stessi dal punto di vista artistico. Per questo motivo cerco sempre di rinnovarmi, e presentare testi che siano stimolanti per me, prima ancora che per il pubblico. Per ora non ho incontrato aspetti negativi, forse perché il mentalismo, pur essendo la mia professione, non riesco ancora a considerarlo un lavoro: rimane sempre la più grande delle mie passioni.

Ecco il sito ufficiale di Francesco Busani.

Subversive farts & musical anuses

Those who have been reading me for some time know my love for unconventional stories, and my stubborn belief that if you dig deep enough into any topic, no matter how apparently inappropriate, it is possible to find some small enlightenments.
In this post we will attempt yet another tightrope walking exercise. Starting from a question that might sound ridiculous at first: can flatulence give us some insight about human nature?

An article appeared on the Petit Journal on May 1st 1894 described “a more or less lyrical artist whose melodies, songs without words, do not come exactly from the heart. To do him justice it must be said that he has pioneered something entirely his own, warbling from the depth of his pants those trills which others, their eyes towards heaven, beam at the ceiling“.
The sensational performer the Parisian newspaper was referring to was Joseph Pujol, famous by his stage name Le Pétomane.

Born in Marseille, and not yet thirty-seven at the time, Pujol had initially brought his act throughout the South of France, in Cette, Béziers, Nîmes, Toulouse and Bordeaux, before eventually landing in Paris, where he performed for several years at the Moulin Rouge.
His very popular show was entirely based on his extraordinary abilities in passing wind: he was able to mimic the sound of different musical instruments, cannon shots, thunders; he could modulate several popular melodies, such as La Marseillese, Au clair de la lune, O sole mio; he could blow out candles with an air blast from 30 centimeters away; he could play flutes and ocarinas through a tube connected with his derriere, with which he was also able to smoke a cigarette.
Enjoying an ever-increasing success between XIX and XX Century, he even performed before the Prince of Whales, and Freud himself attended one of his shows (although he seemed more interested in the audience reactions rather than the act itself).

Pujol had discovered his peculiar talent by chance at the age of thirteen, when he was swimming in the sea of his French Riviera. After sensing a piercing cold in his intestine, he hurried back to the shore and, inside a bathing-hut, he discovered that his anus had, for some reason, taken in a good amount of sea water. Experimenting throughout the following years, Pujol trained himself to suck air into his bottom; he could not hold it for very long, but this bizarre gift guaranteed him a certain notoriety among his peers at first, and later among his fellow soldiers when he joined the army.
Once he had reached stage fame, and was already a celebrated artist, Pujol was examined by several doctors who were interested in studying his anatomy and physiology. Medicine papers are a kind of literature I very much enjoy reading, but few are as delectable as the article penned by Dr. Marcel Badouin and published in 1892 on the Semaine médicale with the title Un cas extraordinaire d’aspiration rectale et d’anus musical (“An extraordinary case of rectal aspiration and musical anus”). If you get by in French, you can read it here.
Among other curiosities, in the article we discover that one of Pujol’s abilities (never included in his acts on grounds of decency) was to sit in a washbowl, sucking in the water and spraying it in a strong gush up to a five-meter distance.

The end of Joseph Pujol’s carreer coincided with the beginning of the First World War. Aware of the unprecedented inhumanity of the conflict, Pujol decided that his ridiculous and slightly shameful art was no longer suitable in front of such a cruel moment, and he retired for good to be a baker, his father’s job, until his death in 1945.
For a long time his figure was removed, as if he was an embarassement for the bougeoisie and those French intellectuals who just a few years earlier were laughing at this strange ham actor’s number. He came back to the spotlight only in the second half of XX Century, namely because of a biography published by Pauvert and of the movie Il Petomane (1983) directed by Pasquale Festa Campanile, in which the title character is played by Italian comedian Ugo Tognazzi with his trademark bittersweet acting style (the film on the other hand was never released in France).

Actually Pujol was not the first nor the last “pétomane”. Among his forerunners there was Roland the Farter, who lived in XII-Century England and who earned 30 acres of land and a huge manorfor his services as a buffoon under King Henry II. By contract he went on to perform before the sovereign, at Christmas, “unum saltum et siffletum et unum bumbulum” (one jump, one whistle and one fart).
But the earliest professional farter we know about must be a medieval jester called Braigetóir, active in Ireland and depicted in the most famous plate of John Derricke’s The Image of Irelande, with a Discoverie of Woodkarne (1581).

The only one attempting to repeat Pujol’s exploits in modern times is British performer Paul Oldfield, known as Mr. Methane, who besides appearing on Britain’s Got Talent also recorded an album and launched his own Android app. If you look for some of his videos on YouTube, you will notice how times have unfortunately changed since the distinguished elegance shown by Pujol in the only remaining silent film of his act.


Let’s get back now to our initial question. What does the story of Joseph Pujol, and professional farters in general, tell us? What is the reason of their success? Why does a fart make us laugh?

Flatulence, as all others bodily expressions associated with disgust, is a cultural taboo. This means that the associated prohibition is variable in time and latitude, it is acquired and not “natural”: it is not innate, but rather something we are taught since a very early age (and we all know what kind of filthy behavior kids are capable of).
Anthropologists link this horror for bodily fluids and emissions to the fear of our animal, pre-civilized heritage; the fear that we might become primitive again, the fear of seeing our middle-class ideal of dignity and cleanliness crumble under the pressure of a remainder of bestiality. It is the same reason for which societies progressively ban cruelty, believed to be an “inhuman” trait.

The interesting fact is that the birth of this family of taboos can be historically, albeit conventionally, traced: the process of civilization (and thus the erection of this social barrier or fronteer) is usually dated back to the XVI and XVII Centuries — which not by chance saw the growing popularity of Della Casa’s etiquette treatise Il Galateo.
In this period, right at the end of the Middle Ages, Western culture begins to establish behavioral rules to limit and codify what is considered respectable.

But in time (as Freud asserted) the taboo is perceived as a burden and a constriction. Therefore a society can look for, or create, certain environments that make it acceptable for a brief period to bend the rules, and escape the discipline. This very mechanism was behind the balsphemous inversions taking place in Carnival times, which were accepted only because strictly limited to a specific time of the year.

In much the same way, Pujol’s fart shows were liberating experiences, only possible on a theatrical stage, in the satyrical context of cabaret. By fracturing the idealistic facade of the gentleman for an hour or so, and counterposing the image of the physiological man, the obscenity of the flesh and its embarassements, Pujol on a first level seemed to mock bourgeois conventions (as later did Buñuel in the infamous dinner scene from his 1974 film The Phantom of Liberty).
Had this been the case, had Pujol’s act been simply subversive, it would had been perceived as offensive and labeled as despicable; his success, on the other hand, seems to point in another direction.

It’s much more plausible that Pujol, with his contrived and refined manners conflicting with the grotesque intestinal noises, was posing as a sort of stock comic character, a marionette, a harmless jester: thanks to this distance, he could arguably enact a true cathartic ritual. The audience laughed at his lewd feats, but were also secretely able to laugh at themselves, at the indecent nature of their bodies. And maybe to accept a bit more their own repressed flaws.

Perhaps that’s the intuition this brief, improper excursus can give us: each time a fart in a movie or a gross toilet humor joke makes us chuckle, we are actually enacting both a defense and an exorcism against the reality we most struggle to accept: the fact that we still, and anyway, belong to the animal kingdom.

On the Midway

Abbiamo spesso parlato dei sideshow e dei luna-park itineranti che si spostavano di città in città attraversando l’America e l’Europa, assieme ai circhi, all’inizio del secolo scorso. Ma cosa proponevano, oltre allo zucchero filato, al tiro al bersaglio, a qualche ruota panoramica e alle meraviglie umane?
In realtà l’offerta di intrattenimenti e di spettacoli all’interno di un sideshow era estremamente diversificata, e comprendeva alcuni show che sono via via scomparsi dal repertorio delle fiere itineranti. Questo articolo scorre brevemente alcune delle attrazioni più sorprendenti dei sideshow americani.

Step right up! Fatevi sotto signore e signori, preparate il biglietto, fatelo timbrare da Hank, il Nano più alto del mondo, ed entrate sulla midway!


All’interno del luna-park, i vari stand e le attrazioni erano normalmente disposti a ferro di cavallo, lasciando un unico grande corridoio centrale in cui si aggirava liberamente il pubblico: la midway, appunto. Su questa “via di mezzo” si affacciavano i bally, le pedane da cui gli imbonitori attiravano l’attenzione con voce stentorea, ipnotica parlantina e indubbio carisma; talvolta si poteva avere una piccola anticipazione di ciò che c’era da aspettarsi, una volta entrati per un quarto di dollaro. Di fianco al signore che pubblicizzava il freakshow, ad esempio, poteva stare seduta la donna barbuta, come “assaggio” dello spettacolo vero e proprio.
A sentire l’imbonitore, ogni spettacolo era il più incredibile evento che occhio umano avesse mai veduto – per questo il termine ballyhoo rimane tutt’oggi nell’uso comune con il significato di pubblicità sensazionalistica ed ingannevole.


Aggirandosi fra gli schiamazzi, la musica di calliope e i colori della midway, si poteva essere incuriositi dalle ultime “danze elettriche”: ballerine i cui abiti si illuminavano magicamente, emanando incredibili raggi di luce… il trucco stava nel fatto che l’abito della performer era completamente bianco, e un riflettore disegnava pattern e fantasie sul suo corpo, mentre danzava. Con l’arrivo dei primissimi proiettori cinematografici, l’idea divenne sempre più elaborata e spettacolare: nel 1899 George La Rose presentò il La Rose’s Electric Fountain Show, che era descritto come

una stupefacente combinazione di Arte, Bellezza e Scienza. Lo show è l’unico al mondo equipaggiato con un grande palco girevole che si alza dall’interno di una fontana. Nel turbinare dell’acqua stanno alcune selezionate artiste che si producono in gruppi statuari, danze illuminate, danze fotografiche e riproduzioni dal vivo dei più raffinati soggetti.

Lo show contava su effetti scenici, cinematografici e si chiudeva con l’eruzione del vulcano Pelée.

L’affascinante e tenebroso esotismo delle tribù “primitive” non passava mai di moda. Ecco quindi i Musei delle Mummie (in realtà minuscoli spazi ricavati all’interno di un carrozzone) che proponevano le tsantsa, teste rimpicciolite degli indios Jivaro, e stravaganze mummificate sempre più fantasiose. Si trattava, ovviamente, di sideshow gaff, ovvero di reperti falsificati ad arte (ne abbiamo parlato in questo articolo) da modellatori e scultori piuttosto abili.

Uno dei migliori in questo campo era certamente William Nelson, proprietario della Nelson Supply House con cui vendeva ai circhi “curiosità mummificate”. Fra le finte mummie offerte a inizio secolo da Nelson, c’erano il leggendario gigante della Patagonia a due teste, King Mac-A-Dula; King Jack-a-Loo-Pa, che secondo la descrizione avrebbe avuto una testa, tre volti, tre mani, tre braccia, tre dita, tre gambe, tre piedi e tre dita dei piedi; il fantastico Poly-Moo-Zuke, creatura a sei gambe; il Grande Cavalluccio Marino, ricavato a partire da un vero teschio di cavallo, la cui coda si divideva in due lunghe pinne munite di zoccoli; mummie egiziane di vario tipo, come ad esempio Labow, il “Doppio Ragazzo Egiziano con Sorella che gli Cresce sul Petto”.

Più avanti la cartapesta verrà soppiantata dalla gomma, con cui si creeranno i finti feti deformi sotto liquido, e dalla cera: nel decennio successivo alla Seconda Guerra, famose attrazioni includevano il cervello di Hitler sotto formalina, e riproduzioni del cadavere del Führer.


Altri classici spettacoli erano le esibizioni di torture. Pubblicizzati dai banner con toni grandguignoleschi, erano in realtà delle ricostruzioni con rozzi manichini che lasciavano sempre un po’ l’amaro in bocca, rispetto alle raffinate crudeltà annunciate. Ma con il tempo anche i walk-through show ampliarono l’offerta, anche sulla scia dei vari successi del cinema noir: ecco quindi che si poteva esplorare i torbidi scenari della prostituzione, delle gambling house in cui loschi figuri giocavano d’azzardo, scene di droga ambientate nelle Chinatown delle grandi città americane, dove mangiatori d’oppio stavano accasciati sulle squallide brandine.

La curiosità per il fosco mondo della malavita stava anche alla base delle attrazioni che promettevano di mostrare straordinari reperti dalle scene del crimine: la gente pagava volentieri la moneta d’entrata per poter ammirare l’automobile in cui vennero uccisi Bonnie e Clyde, su cui erano visibili i fori di proiettile causati dallo scontro a fuoco con le forze dell’ordine. Peccato che quasi ogni sideshow avesse la sua “autentica” macchina di Bonnie e Clyde, così come circolavano decine di Cadillac che sarebbero appartenute ad Al Capone o ad altri famigerati gangster. Anzi, crivellare di colpi una macchina e tentare di venderla al circo poteva rivelarsi un buon affare, come dimostrano le inserzioni dell’epoca.

Nulla, però, fermava le folle come il frastuono delle moto che giravano a tutto gas nel motodromo.
Evoluzione di quelli progettati per le biciclette, già in circolazione dalla metà dell’800, i motodromi con pareti inclinate lasciarono il posto a loro volta ai silodrome, detti anche Wall of Death, con pareti verticali. Assistere a questi spettacoli, dal bordo del “pozzo”, era una vera e propria esperienza adrenalinica, che attaccava tutti i sensi contemporaneamente con l’odore della benzina, il rumore dei motori, le motociclette che sfrecciavano a pochi centimetri dal pubblico e gli scossoni dell’intera struttura in legno, vibrante sotto la potenza di questi temerari centauri. Con lo sviluppo della tecnologia, anche le auto da corsa avranno i loro spettacoli in autodromi verticali; e, per aggiungere un po’ di pepe al tutto, si cominceranno a inserire stunt ancora più impressionanti, come ad esempio l’inseguimento dei leoni (lion chase) che, in alcune varianti, vengono addirittura fatti salire a bordo delle auto che sfrecciano in tondo (lion race).

Ogni sideshow aveva i suoi live act con artisti eclettici: mangiaspade, giocolieri, buttafuoco, fachiri, lanciatori di coltelli, trampolieri, uomini forzuti e stuntman di grande originalità. Ma l’idea davvero affascinante, in retrospettiva, è l’evidente consapevolezza che qualsiasi cosa potesse costituire uno spettacolo, se ben pubblicizzato: dalla ricostruzione dell’Ultima Cena si Gesù, ai primi “polmoni d’acciaio” di cui si faceva un gran parlare, dai domatori di leoni alle gare di scimmie nelle loro minuscole macchinine.


Certo, il principio di Barnum — “ogni minuto nasce un nuovo allocco” — era sempre valido, e una buona parte di questi show possono essere visti oggi come ingannevoli trappole mangiasoldi, studiate appositamente per il pubblico rurale e poco istruito. Eppure si può intuire che, al di là del business, il fulcro su cui faceva leva il sideshow era la più ingenua e pura meraviglia.

Molti lo ricordano ancora: l’arrivo dei carrozzoni del circo, con la musica, le luci colorate e la promessa di visioni incredibili e magiche, per la popolazione dei piccoli villaggi era un vero e proprio evento, l’irruzione del fantastico nella quotidiana routine della fatica. E allora sì, anche se qualche dime era speso a vanvera, a fine serata si tornava a casa consci che quelle quattro mura non erano tutto: il circo regalava la sensazione di vivere in un mondo diverso. Un mondo esotico, sconosciuto, popolato da persone stravaganti e pittoresche. Un mondo in cui poteva accadere l’impossibile.

Gran parte delle immagini è tratta da A. W. Stencell, Seeing Is Believing: America’s Sideshows.

Testa di Legno

Melvin Burkhardt è stato, a suo modo, una leggenda. Ha lavorato nei principali luna park e circhi americani dagli anni ’20 fino al suo ritiro dalle scene nel 1989.

Nel mondo dei sideshow americani, lo spettacolo di Mel faceva parte dei cosiddetti working act, ossia quelle esibizioni incentrate sulle abilità dell’artista piuttosto che sulle sue deformità genetiche o acquisite. Ma quello che davvero lo distingueva da tanti altri performer specializzati in una singola prodezza, era l’incredibile ecletticità del suo talento: nella sua lunghissima carriera, Burkhardt ha ingoiato spade, lanciato coltelli, sputato fuoco, combattuto serpenti, eseguito innovativi numeri di magia, resistito allo shock della sedia elettrica.

melvin-burkhart

È stato anche la prima “Meraviglia Anatomica” della storia del circo, grazie alla sua capacità di risucchiare lo stomaco dentro la gabbia toracica, allungare il collo oltre misura, far protrudere le scapole in maniera grottesca, torcere la testa quasi a 180°, “rigirare” lo stomaco sul suo stesso asse. Mel sapeva anche sorridere con metà faccia, mentre l’altra metà si accigliava preoccupata (provate a coprire alternativamente con una mano la foto qui sotto per rendervi conto della sua incredibile abilità).

Le sue specialità erano talmente tante che, durante la Grande Depressione, Burkhardt riuscì a sostenere da solo ben 9 dei 14 numeri proposti dal circo per cui lavorava. Praticamente un one-man show, tanto che alle volte qualcuno fra il pubblico lo punzecchiava ironicamente gridandogli: “Vedremo qualcun altro, stasera, oltre a te?”
Ma il suo maggiore contributo alla storia dei circhi itineranti è senza dubbio il numero chiamato The Human Blockhead – ovvero, la “Testa di Legno Umana”. La genesi di questo stunt, come tutto quello che concerneva Burkhardt, è piuttosto eccentrica. Ad un certo punto della sua vita, Melvin si era lasciato prendere dalla velleità di diventare un pugile professionista; purtroppo però, dopo la sesta sconfitta consecutiva, si ritrovò con i denti rotti, il labbro tumefatto e il naso completamente fracassato. Finito sotto i ferri del chirurgo, Burkhardt stava contemplando la rovina della sua carriera agonistica mentre il medico, con pinze ed altri strumenti, estraeva dalle sue cavità nasali dei sanguinolenti pezzi di osso. Eppure, mentre veniva operato, ecco che piano piano si faceva strada in lui un’illuminazione: i lunghi attrezzi del medico entravano così facilmente nel naso per rimuovere i frammenti di turbinati fratturati, che forse si poteva sfruttare questa scoperta e costruirci attorno un numero!

Detto fatto: Melvin Burkhardt divenne il primo performer ad esibirsi nell’impressionante atto di piantarsi a martellate un chiodo nel naso.

Lo spettacolo dello Human Blockhead fa leva sulla concezione errata che le nostre narici salgano verso l’alto, percorrendo la cartilagine fino all’attaccatura del naso: l’anatomia ci insegna invece che la cavità nasale si apre direttamente dietro i fori del naso, in orizzontale. Un chiodo o un altro oggetto abbastanza sottile da non causare lesioni interne può essere inserito nel setto nasale senza particolari danni.

chiodo_3

Proprio come accade per i mangiatori di spade, non c’è quindi alcun trucco: si tratta in questo caso di comprendere fino a dove si può spingere il chiodo, come inclinarlo e quale forza applicare. La parte più lunga e difficile sta nell’allenarsi a controllare ed inibire il riflesso dello starnuto, che potrebbe risultare estremamente pericoloso; altri rischi includono infezioni alle fosse nasali, ai seni paranasali e alla gola, rottura dei turbinati, lacerazioni della mucosa e via dicendo (nei casi più estremi si potrebbe arrivare addirittura a danneggiare lo sfenoide). Un lungo periodo di pratica e di studio del proprio corpo è necessario per imparare tutte le mosse necessarie.

human-block-head-3

Mel Burkhardt, però, non era affatto geloso delle sue invenzioni, anzi: con generosità davvero inusuale per il cinico mondo dello show business, insegnava tutti i suoi trucchi ai giovani performer. Così, lo Human Blockhead divenne uno dei grandi classici della tradizione circense, replicato ed eseguito infinite volte nelle decadi successive.

Magic-Brian-and-Tyler-Fyre-perform-The-Human-Blockhead-pic-by-Mitchell-Klein

Anche oggi, dopo che nel 2001 Melvin Burkhardt ci ha lasciato all’età di 94 anni, innumerevoli performer e fachiri continuano a piantarsi chiodi nel naso, nella cornice degli ultimi, rari sideshow – così come nella loro moderna controparte, i talent show televisivi da “guinness dei primati”. Moltissime le varianti rispetto al vecchio e risaputo chiodo: c’è chi nel naso inserisce coltelli, trapani elettrici funzionanti, lecca-lecca, ganci da macellaio, e chi più ne ha più ne metta. Ma nessuno di questi numeri può replicare la sorniona e consumata verve del vecchio Mel Burkhardt che, a chi gli chiedeva se ci fosse un trucco o un segreto, rispondeva serafico: “Uso un naso finto”.

Il Teatro Anatomico di Padova

f16.highres

Nel 1493, Alessandro Benedetti pubblica a Padova la sua Historia corporis humani, nella quale alla fine del capitolo primo è citato per la prima volta nella storia il concetto di teatro anatomico. Si trattava di un palco provvisorio in legno, montabile e smontabile all’occorrenza, a forma di anfiteatro, all’interno del quale questo celebre professore operava delle pubbliche dissezioni a beneficio degli studenti di medicina, e non solo.
All’epoca gli anatomisti potevano dissezionare esclusivamente i cadaveri dei condannati a morte, e Benedetti propose di estendere il permesso anche ai morti per malattia: fu anche grazie al suo impulso che la pratica settoria si diffuse in ambito medico, ma toccherà aspettare Vesalio (di cui abbiamo parlato in un articolo per l’ultimo numero di Illustrati) perché la mentalità scientifica al riguardo approdi alla piena maturità. E, proprio esaminando il famosissimo frontespizio del suo De humani corporis fabrica, e “cancellando” tutti gli spettatori, si può avere un’idea delle strutture a gradoni che venivano utilizzate durante le dissezioni.

url

vesalio1

Un secolo dopo l’invenzione del teatro anatomico smontabile di Benedetti, sempre a Padova, insegnava il chirurgo Girolamo Fabrici d’Acquapendente.
Come un gran numero degli anatomisti dell’epoca, anche Fabrici era un personaggio particolare. Era uno studioso infaticabile, curava gratuitamente i poveri, eppure il suo carattere scontroso e la negligenza nello svolgere il suo ruolo di insegnante gli causarono non poche critiche. “Sopraordinario nella lettura di Anatomia e Chirurgia”, nonostante i suoi invidiabili titoli accademici (e il suo stipendio da capogiro), era famoso per la sua incostanza alle lezioni: si dava malato, spesso le iniziava in ampio ritardo, e se finalmente si decideva ad insegnare, gli studenti avevano un bel daffare a comprendere le sue parole, dato che la sua voce era praticamente un sussurro per via di una laringite cronica.

Girolamo_Fabrizi_d'Acquapendente
Ironicamente, dobbiamo proprio alla sua pigrizia la nascita del primo teatro anatomico permanente. Fabrici era infatti stanco di dover tenere le lezioni all’aperto, in balia delle bizze metereologiche, e sgolandosi perché gli spettatori delle ultime file non riuscivano a sentire. Quando, attraverso un Console della Nazione Germanica, venne a sapere che anche gli studenti di medicina tedeschi che studiavano a Padova lamentavano la mancanza di un teatro per seguire le lezioni, colse la palla al balzo e commissionò (forse a Fra’ Paolo Sarpi) il progetto.

Teatro Anatomico

Teatro anatomico2

Théâtre-anatomique-Padoue

dsc_7955_named
Nel 1595 venne completato il teatro anatomico all’interno del Palazzo del Bo, sede dell’Università (molti altri verranno costruiti successivamente in diverse facoltà europee). Si tratta di un grande teatro ovale, con sei gallerie estremamente ripide che ricordano facilmente una visione dantesca dell’Inferno. Può contenere circa 300 persone: gli spettatori si affacciavano ai parapetti delle gallerie, mentre sul piano inferiore, il “palcoscenico”, si svolgeva lo spettacolo.

necrophilia_3

E di vero e proprio spettacolo si trattava, impressionante e macabro. Immaginatevi di stare assiepati in questo vertiginoso teatro a forma di cono rovesciato, nell’oscurità pressoché totale, l’unica luce proveniente da un paio di candelabri posti ai fianchi del tavolo settorio sul fondo. Due “massari”, il cui compito era quello di procurare i cadaveri e assistere il professore, scoprono il corpo senza vita di un condannato (o in alternativa di qualche animale – cani, maiali, e perfino scimmie ed orsi). Entra l’anatomista, che indossa orgogliosamente un grembiule macchiato del sangue di decenni di operazioni chirurgiche e dissezioni. Per gli occhi della gente semplice è quasi un mago: una minuscola orchestra da camera sottolinea la sua entrata con l’esecuzione di una pomposa musichetta. In pochi minuti, il torace del morto viene inciso ed aperto, le interiora messe all’aria; a questo punto l’intero teatro è esposto alle esalazioni maleodoranti. Con pochi, decisi tagli (gran parte del lavoro sporco lo fanno gli assistenti), il professore dimostra la sua esperienza e la sua maestria, estraendo ed esibendo qualche organo in particolare, pontificando sul sistema circolatorio o su determinate afflizioni patologiche. A fine spettacolo, dopo gli applausi e dopo che il pubblico è uscito, viene aperto il tetto mobile per lasciare fuoriuscire i cattivi odori.

wellcome-copyright-marchetti-1654_1
L’atmosfera cupa del teatro venne attenuata nel 1844 con la costruzione di un lucernario che potesse far entrare la luce del sole. In seguito, quando le esecuzioni capitali si fecero più rare, a poco a poco le attività del teatro anatomico diminuirono, fino a quando nel 1872 smise definitivamente di funzionare. Ma rimane ancora oggi perfettamente conservato e restaurato, non ha mai subito alcuna modifica ed è parte integrante del percorso di visite guidate di Palazzo Bo.

teatro_anatomico-padova

(Grazie, Cristina!)

Speciale: Mariano Tomatis

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Ama l’appellativo di wonder injector, istillatore di meraviglia o “tecnico dello stupore”. Quello che comincia come un rapido giro sul suo sito o sul suo blog si trasforma inevitabilmente in un viaggio di diverse ore, in preda ad una vertigine crescente. È difficile raccontare o definire Mariano Tomatis, ed è bello che lo sia.

Mariano si occupa di illusionismo, magia, matematica, criminologia e tecnologia. Ma, qualsiasi campo stia affrontando, lo fa inevitabilmente da un punto di vista inaspettato. Il suo lavoro è tutto proteso a un nuovo modo di relazionarsi con la meraviglia, a farla irrompere nel nostro quotidiano superando i modi triti e ritriti di quei misteri che in queste pagine abbiamo spesso definito “da supermarket”, preconfezionati, tipici di tanti libri o trasmissioni televisive.

Mariano Tomatis è il tipo di persona che, leggendo uno strano trattato esoterico seicentesco contenente alcune tavole crittografate secondo un sistema complicatissimo, si domanda: che tipo di computer avranno usato per codificarlo, all’epoca? E lo costruisce.

20130322m

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

20130322f

20130322g
È anche il tipo di persona che, vedendo l’ennesimo numero di magia in cui una bella ragazza viene tagliata a metà, sa scorgerne le implicazioni sessiste e non esita a raccontarci come un numero simile sia nato sorprendentemente proprio da problematiche politiche legati agli albori dei diritti della donna (in questo breve documentario).

20130526f

20130526h
O, ancora, esaminando uno dei quadri più celebri della storia dell’arte ci racconta le infinite risme di ipotesi, sempre più fantascientifiche, che il dipinto ha originato… per poi gelarci con un’interpretazione molto più semplice e illuminante.

[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6jvE_hcbxrM]

La performance che ha scritto assieme a Ferdinando Buscema ha aperto Ingenuity, una sontuosa celebrazione dell’intelligenza, della curiosità e della meraviglia che ha coinvolto scienziati, artisti, scrittori, designer, musicisti e maghi provenienti da tutto il mondo, organizzata da BoingBoing, uno dei siti di informazione geek e cyberpunk più letti al mondo. Potete vedere la performance qui.

20130814c

Oltre ad aver scritto libri sul mentalismo, sui numeri e sull’illusionismo, Mariano ci regala continuamente nuovi stimoli, riportando storie curiose e poco note che affronta con scrupolo, determinato com’è a “illuminare le meraviglie sul confine tra Scienza e Mistero”.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA
In esclusiva per Bizzarro Bazar, ecco la nostra intervista a Mariano Tomatis.

Qual è la tua formazione?

Ho una laurea in Informatica e mi occupo di illusionismo da quindici anni.

Come hai incominciato ad appassionarti di illusionismo, misteri e scienza?

Recentemente ho ritrovato un tema scritto quando facevo le elementari, in cui mi ripromettevo – quando fossi stato “grande” – di fare luce sui principali misteri: dal mostro di Lochness al triangolo delle Bermude, fino alla perduta città di Atlantide. Ho incontrato l’illusionismo ammirando il mago Silvan e formandomi sulle sue scatole magiche. Vivendo a Torino, ho avuto la fortuna di scoprire e frequentare il Circolo Amici della Magia, dove l’arte magica è particolarmente valorizzata. Da qualche anno, insieme a Ferdinando Buscema, stiamo definendo il concetto di “magic experience design” – un approccio all’illusionismo che trascende il contesto teatrale e interviene sulla realtà, facendo succedere eventi magici nel quotidiano.

Il tuo approccio ai cosiddetti “misteri” (quello di Rennes-le-Château viene in mente per primo) è del tutto originale – ironico, scettico, e allo stesso tempo entusiasta: come concili queste tendenze? Si può dire che tu stia sfruttando il fascino di questi enigmi per parlarci in realtà di qualcos’altro?

Conciliare una consapevolezza razionale e un’immersione ingenua nei misteri potrebbe sembrare il tentativo di avere la botte piena e la moglie ubriaca, eppure si tratta di un equilibrio su cui molti autori hanno scritto pagine brillanti. Michael Saler lo chiama “incanto disincantato”. Joshua Landy parla di “sistemi di credenze consapevoli della propria illusorietà”. Orhan Pamuk confessa di scrivere romanzi la cui funzione principale è quella di coltivare tale capacità nel lettore. Il padre della prestigiazione moderna, Robert-Houdin, costruiva i suoi spettacoli in modo da premiare un atteggiamento di distaccata credulità. Con Sherlock Holmes, Conan Doyle ha creato un personaggio talmente verosimile che oggi i suoi fan continuano a visitare la sua casa in Baker Street a Londra, del tutto consapevoli di partecipare a un gioco. Coltivare nel lettore moderno questo atteggiamento è una scelta estetica a cui aderisco pienamente.
Nel dichiarare i suoi intenti, il Cicap afferma di usare il fascino dei misteri per spiegare la Scienza. Nel mio caso, spiegare la Scienza è solo un effetto collaterale: il mio intento è quello di contribuire al re-incantamento del mondo, e credo che il miglior modo di farlo sia l’educazione all’incanto disincantato.

In diversi tuoi lavori si avverte una particolare vertigine, che è quella di non poter esattamente sapere a che punto finiscono i fatti, e quando incomincia il “trucco”. Anche qui ho la sensazione che mischiare realtà e finzione sia, certamente, un gioco divertente; ma al tempo stesso, vista la sistematicità con cui lo utilizzi, che vi sia dietro un progetto più preciso.

Credo di averti risposto sopra. Per citare un altro dei miei autori più amati, Lovecraft mescolò in modi raffinati realtà e finzione, producendo potenti sensazioni di straniamento attraverso i suoi racconti. Nel suo Weird Realism: Lovecraft and Philosophy Graham Harman ne esplora le tecniche narrative con una notevole ampiezza di analisi. Leggendo Harman, oggi mi chiedo come Lovecraft avrebbe sfruttato Twitter, Facebook e YouTube per produrre le stesse sensazioni disturbanti. Accostare personaggi di epoche lontane alle moderne tecnologie offre straordinari spunti creativi. Se c’è un progetto dietro la sistematicità con cui lavoro su questi confini, esso riguarda la possibilità di portare alla luce modi per meravigliare sempre nuovi, più profondi e al passo coi tempi. E magari di ispirare un Lovecraft 2.0!

Lovecraft-Facebook
Il mentalismo è intrigante soprattutto in quanto smaschera le trappole del nostro pensiero. Si può dire che vi sia un utilizzo “sano” del mistero e della meraviglia, e un altro invece “pericoloso”?

Michael Saler identifica nell’ironia l’elemento che è alla base della meraviglia “sana”. Inganno (e autoinganno) diventano pericolosi dove non c’è consapevolezza ironica, ma aperta volontà di approfittare di un altro individuo. Dovremmo sempre tenere in mente le parole di Joseph Pulitzer: «Non esiste delitto, inganno, trucco, imbroglio e vizio che non vivano della loro segretezza. Portate alla luce del giorno questi segreti, descriveteli, rendeteli ridicoli agli occhi di tutti e prima o poi la pubblica opinione li getterà via. La sola divulgazione di per sé non è forse sufficiente, ma è l’unico mezzo senza il quale falliscono tutti gli altri».

Hai parlato di educazione alla complessità: come sta cambiando, o come deve secondo te cambiare, la magia nell’era tecnologica, non soltanto a livello di nuovi strumenti ma anche di portata etica?

La mentalità postmoderna deve contaminare l’illusionismo molto più di quanto abbia fatto finora. È ora che i prestigiatori si interroghino seriamente sul ruolo che possono avere le loro storie nel mondo contemporaneo. Terence McKenna diceva che «il vero segreto della magia è che il mondo è fatto di parole, e che se tu conosci le parole di cui il mondo è fatto puoi farne quello che vuoi». Anche se sembra una considerazione esoterica, è un’immagine precisa del potere che hanno le storie nel plasmare la realtà. Concordo con Wu Ming 4 quando scrive che “le narrazioni ci appartengono almeno quanto noi apparteniamo a esse. Noi interagiamo con le narrazioni allo stesso modo in cui interagiamo con il mondo che ci circonda, consapevoli che per cambiarlo abbiamo innanzi tutto bisogno di raccontarlo diversamente”. Credo che l’illusionismo, come la letteratura militante, possa avere una dimensione marziale – e che tale forza sia ampiamente da esplorare. Il mio documentario Donne a metà (2013) va in quella direzione. Penn&Teller sono la coppia di illusionisti più all’avanguardia su questo versante.

magic-and-the-brain_1

Da specialista dell’incanto per il tuo pubblico, c’è qualcosa oggi che riesce ad incantare te?

Continuamente. Aderisco totalmente alla metafora che David Pescovitz usò per rispondere alla domanda della rivista Edge “Che cosa ti rende ottimista?” L’editor del blog BoingBoing scrisse di essere ottimista perché il mondo è una gigantesca Wunderkammer, pronta a stupirci a ogni angolo.
Un blog come il tuo ha il grande valore di dimostrarlo quotidianamente.

[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Y13tSEyOqGs]

Ecco il sito ufficiale di Mariano Tomatis.

Winny Puhh

win

I Winny Puhh sono una band proveniente dall’Estonia, il cui genere potrebbe essere definito come un misto di punk, heavy metal e follia pura. Nei loro show, sempre altamente teatrali, fanno uso di strumenti atipici (balalaika, banjo), di effetti speciali, make-up e costumi elaborati e assolutamente weird.

Pur essendo attivi dai primi anni ’90, soltanto oggi, grazie a YouTube, il mondo si è accorto di loro. Per farvi capire la portata spettacolare delle loro esibizioni, eccoli alle semifinali estone per la qualificazione all’Eurovision Song Contest 2013, con il loro pezzo Meiecundimees üks Korsakov läks eile Lätti.

[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=2dllo85ZSUk]

Purtroppo i Winny Puhh non si sono qualificati. Eppure è strano, visto che hanno scelto il loro nome (che significa, pensate un po’, Winnie The Pooh) proprio per piacere a grandi e piccini.